ScanPro 3000? What is that for?

ScanPro 3000? What is that for?

Posted by: on November 12, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tips and Tools

Did your quest for that perfect article ever lead you to microfilm?

microfilm1

NY Times from 1852? Got it!  Newsweek 1942?     We can show you were to find that too!

 

PML has an extensive collection of microfilm!        But once you’ve found the microfilm, how do you view it?

 Use ClubPhil’s ScanPro 3000!!

SP3000

 

This microfilm reader scans as well as prints!  You can email or save to a USB device primary source material to view later.  Need to highlight an area to see that text a little better?  This machine is for you!  With advanced editing features, previously obscured text becomes visible.  The ScanPro 3000 brings the latest technologies to microfilm research.

 Stop by ClubPhil we will show you how to use the ScanPro 3000!

OhGoody

Did your quest for that perfect article ever lead you to microfilm? NY Times from 1852? Got it!  Newsweek 1942?     We can show you were to find that too!   PML has an extensive collection of microfilm!        But once you’ve found the microfilm, how do you view it?  Use ClubPhil’s ScanPro 3000!!   This microfilm […]MORE

But just what is EBL?

Posted by: on October 6, 2015   |Comments (0)|online resources

In all the time that you’ve spent at the library, have you ever heard of “EBL”? Do you know what it is? Do you know what “EBL” stands for?

I’m not entirely sure what “EBL” stands for, but I do know it’s a way you can access over 500,000 E-Books. (To put that in perspective, in the entire Club Phil Library, there are only around 400,000 physical books!)

It’s a little bit tricky to start using EBL, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll find that it’s one of the best—and easiest—ways to find and read material for your research.

To access EBL, you first click its link below the “Get It!” column on the library homepage.

Get It

Next, you enter the username and password that you use for Sakai.

Sakai

 

Finally, you can search EBL for titles or topics that you’re interested in. 

EBL

 

But what, really, does “EBL” mean? Electronic Book Library? Excellent Bibliotheque Luau? Exclusively Bookish Lunatics?

In all the time that you’ve spent at the library, have you ever heard of “EBL”? Do you know what it is? Do you know what “EBL” stands for? I’m not entirely sure what “EBL” stands for, but I do know it’s a way you can access over 500,000 E-Books. (To put that in perspective, […]MORE

Congratulations!

Posted by: on September 10, 2015   |Comments (0)|Announcements

Phillips Memorial Library along with the Center for Engaged Learning are pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 Undergraduate Craft of Research Prize!  It was a competitive pool, but five students emerged victorious:

1st Place—John Hindley, Neocolonialism, Liberation Theology and the Nicaraguan Revolution
2nd Place– Jacquelyn Kelley, The Little Magazine That Did Big Things
3rd Place—Daniel Gagnon, France and the Community of Six: The Schuman Declaration to the Treaties of Rome

Honorable Mention: Meaghan Dodson, Radical Rejections and Sloppy Seconds
Honorable Mention: Hao You, Men, Women and War: An Examination of Gender Conflicts within Othello

 

The winners receive prizes, certificates and the chance to have their work published in PC’s Digital Commons.  Congratulations to all who won and who participated!

Phillips Memorial Library along with the Center for Engaged Learning are pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 Undergraduate Craft of Research Prize!  It was a competitive pool, but five students emerged victorious: 1st Place—John Hindley, Neocolonialism, Liberation Theology and the Nicaraguan Revolution 2nd Place– Jacquelyn Kelley, The Little Magazine That Did Big Things […]MORE

EBSCO Discovery Service – LAND HO!

Posted by: on April 11, 2014   |Comments (0)|online resources

“Why can’t I search everything in the Library like I search Google?” We often hear this complaint.

google_god

Problem is, the Library has SO many different items – books, ebooks, databases, online journals, videos, streaming media, local collections, etc etc. Access to all of these items has traditionally required you to go to each of their web interfaces to do searching. There wasn’t a way to search EVERYTHING at once.

Well, times and technology are changing, and libraries now have a way to present a Google-like single search box to patrons. There’s something called a “discovery service” that finally brings it all together.

columbus_telescope

How does a discovery service work? A GINORMOUS index of the “metadata” from every entry of every resource gets built. (Metadata is all of the information about the entry, such as the title, author, subject, abstract, publication place and date, and even the text within the entry itself. ). Then, whenever you type in a search term, the discovery service looks through the index, relevancy-ranks all of the items that match your search terms, and displays them for you. This is true one-stop searching!

But even better – we are trialing a discovery service right now! It’s called EDS, which stands for EBSCO Discovery Service. But  don’t let the name fool you, EDS has  way more than just EBSCO resources.

EDS search box

Try it! Click on the image above to get to the EDS page.  If you’re off campus, you will be asked to log in – just use your name and PC barcode.

Keep in mind that this product is still undergoing a test drive! So it might act funky at times. But it’s definitely worth a try –  and please send us questions and feedback!

askalibrarian@lists.providence.edu

 

 

 

“Why can’t I search everything in the Library like I search Google?” We often hear this complaint. Problem is, the Library has SO many different items – books, ebooks, databases, online journals, videos, streaming media, local collections, etc etc. Access to all of these items has traditionally required you to go to each of their […]MORE

Research Guides: The Best Place to Start Your Research

Posted by: on November 21, 2013   |Comments (0)|Tips and Tools

pc-researchguide-header

Have a big paper or project to get done before the end of the semester?  Not sure where to start?  Our Research Guides cover over 60 subjects and are the perfect place to begin your search for library materials.  Consider them to be one-stop-shopping places to start your research.

Our guides:

  • Give you tips for finding books & e-books in the catalog;
  • Suggest the right databases for your topic that will help you find articles, primary sources, multimedia & more;
  • Highlight the best web sites to use for research.

Research Guides Screenshot

Of course, you can always text, email, call or visit us in the library with any questions you may have!  Happy searching!!!

 

Have a big paper or project to get done before the end of the semester?  Not sure where to start?  Our Research Guides cover over 60 subjects and are the perfect place to begin your search for library materials.  Consider them to be one-stop-shopping places to start your research. Our guides: Give you tips for […]MORE