Phil Buzz - Providence College Blogs

How do you study?

Posted by: on November 7, 2013   |Comments (0)|Student Life

Studying can a be smooth or very bumpy experience! How can you navigate this challenge? There are many do’s and don’ts when it comes to studying, here are a few tips to keep you on the path to success!animated_clockDO:
Figure out a time management system that works for you. There are many options out there: you can use a calendar, planner, sticky-notes, or even make a list of your upcoming assignments.

Determine how much time you need to complete each task (study for that test, get sources for that paper, outline that paper, write the paper etc.). Make a schedule and try to stick to it. Assess your tasks and try to break them into smaller parts, it will sticky-notesmake the whole assignment easier.

  • Evernote can help you organize all the steps and keep you on target.

Find a comfortable environment. If it is too hot, too cold, too noisy, too quiet (you get my point) this will distract you from the task at hand.

  • Come to the library, there is a variety of group and individual study areas available, come find your comfortable environment.

Plan ahead! You can make an appointment with the Writing Center or submit to “The Write Site” on Sakai for review. Appointments book quickly and you have to allow 48 hours for your paper to be reviewed via “The Write Site”.

Keep yourself healthy! Eat well and get enough rest, this will help you stay focused and on the path to that A+!

healthy-eating

Studying can a be smooth or very bumpy experience! How can you navigate this challenge? There are many do’s and don’ts when it comes to studying, here are a few tips to keep you on the path to success!DO: Figure out a time management system that works for you. There are many options out there: […]MORE

How did that book get there?

Posted by: on November 4, 2013   |Comments (0)|Library

book.running

Have you ever wondered how a book becomes available for you to check out?  Sounds like it would be a simple process, the book is ordered and put out into the library stacks.  Well it is a bit more complicated than that, let’s begin the journey of how a book comes to PC!!

book.waving.pointing

 The whole process begins with a PC community member requesting a book, shocking right?  Ok I guess not so much!  The majority of the requests go directly to the Collections Services inbox.  I receive the request and confirm that PC does not currently own it.  The next turn takes us to the vendor, I shift into high gear and order the book.  Yes normally this is a speedy process, except when:  a rare book is requested, a book written in a foreign language, the book is out of print, or the book is will be published in the next few months, this can put us rapidly into the slow lane.

book.stop.sign

Once the book is ordered we park and wait for the item to arrive.  Travel time will vary based on the type of book, it may arrive in a few days, weeks or months!  Once the book has travelled to PC we are back in gear.  The book is reviewed to confirm it is the requested item, the book then passes over to the catalog department and it is cataloged into our system.  Once the book is cataloged it becomes discoverable when you search the library catalog.  The catalog department will also add any labels or stamps that it needs.

book.pointing.person The final stage of the trip is nearly complete.  The book gets placed onto a cart and rolled out to the appropriate shelf according to its Library of Congress call number.  Then the journey begins again, with you.  You search the catalog, find the book that you are looking for and then check it out. Tah-daah!

Have you ever wondered how a book becomes available for you to check out?  Sounds like it would be a simple process, the book is ordered and put out into the library stacks.  Well it is a bit more complicated than that, let’s begin the journey of how a book comes to PC!!  The whole […]MORE

Learn to use RefWorks in 15 minutes!

Posted by: on October 31, 2013   |Comments (0)|Events

If  writing bibliographies make you feel like this:

keyboarddone

Then use RefWorks to create bibliographies in ONE CLICK and start feeling like this:

thebest

 Learn how in a quick 15 minute session next week:

When: Tuesday 11/5 & Wednesday 11/6
@ 5:00 & 5:30
Where: Library E-Classroom (Rm. 233)
RSVP: http://bit.ly/clubphil_rw15
(Walk-ins also welcome)

RWlogo_orange

Learn more about RefWorks here.

If  writing bibliographies make you feel like this: Then use RefWorks to create bibliographies in ONE CLICK and start feeling like this:  Learn how in a quick 15 minute session next week: When: Tuesday 11/5 & Wednesday 11/6 @ 5:00 & 5:30 Where: Library E-Classroom (Rm. 233) RSVP: http://bit.ly/clubphil_rw15 (Walk-ins also welcome) Learn more about RefWorks here.MORE

The Buzz about library e-books

Posted by: on October 29, 2013   |Comments (0)|Tips and Tools

Oh sure, you know what an e-book is. You know you can buy one – they’re all over the Amazon pages. You need one of those Kindles or Nooks to read them – right? Wrong! Especially for e-books here in the Library.

Our e-books (the correct way to spell it includes a hyphen – it’s listed in the Oxford English Dictionary as “e-book”) don’t  require you to have an e-reader or app  to read them.  In fact, all of the e-books in the HELIN catalog can be read from ANY device that has a  web browser.

When you find a title that’s available in e-book format in the HELIN catalog, it might look like this:

ebrary book record in HELIN

To open the e-book, you would click “Show Links to Web Content”, and the entry to open PC ‘s “copy” will display first.

But, because we get e-books from a number of different vendors, they all look a bit different when you view them in a browser. Here are some examples:

ebrary ebook image

 

 

Here’s the title we selected in the box above. This one is from ebrary. All of the navigation buttons (next page, enlarge text, etc. ) are at the top of the window. The book cover image is shown as a thumbnail in the lower right corner.

 

…and another example:

ebsco ebook image

Here’s a different  e-book , from Ebsco. You have to look to the bottom of the screen to get the button to advance to the next page. There are also options along the right hand sidebar. You can also see that the book’s cover is displayed right in the main viewing window.

 

 

So what happens if you want to download them to your iPad or other mobile device? You can do that too – although you can’t download every part of every book. It’s complicated! We will explain all this in a future post….

Until then, happy e-reading!

Oh sure, you know what an e-book is. You know you can buy one – they’re all over the Amazon pages. You need one of those Kindles or Nooks to read them – right? Wrong! Especially for e-books here in the Library. Our e-books (the correct way to spell it includes a hyphen – it’s […]MORE

Past Presidents Exhibit

Posted by: on October 21, 2013   |Comments (0)|Library

blogWhen visiting the library, take note of the new display in the foyer “Past Providence College Presidents.”

The display features the past six presidents prior to Father Brian J. Shanley, O.P.:  Robert J. Slavin, O.P., 1947-1961,; Vincent Cyril Dore, O.P., 1961-1965; William P. Haas, O.P., 1965-1971; Thomas R. Peterson, O.P., 1971-1985; John F. Cunningham, O.P., 1985-1994,; Alphonsus P. Smith, O.P., 1994-2005.

This is a great opportunity to increase your knowledge of the history of Providence College.  By perusing the exhibit, you will learn about the highlights of each President’s tenure through their publications, biographies and viewing the photographs placed throughout the foyer display cases. Included are some amusing images that add some lightness to this display!  One example is Father Philip Smith, O.P. sitting on Santa Claus’s lap!

The exhibit also contains timelines with interesting facts about each President, in particular the names of dorms and buildings and how that came about…which leads to the “burning” question, “why is the Student Union Hall named Slavin Center?” Find the answer and more!

The display is open until December 15, 2013.

When visiting the library, take note of the new display in the foyer “Past Providence College Presidents.” The display features the past six presidents prior to Father Brian J. Shanley, O.P.:  Robert J. Slavin, O.P., 1947-1961,; Vincent Cyril Dore, O.P., 1961-1965; William P. Haas, O.P., 1965-1971; Thomas R. Peterson, O.P., 1971-1985; John F. Cunningham, O.P., […]MORE