The Cowl: News, Tradition, and Uniquely PC

The Cowl: News, Tradition, and Uniquely PC

Posted by: on March 8, 2016   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

What do you think of when you see the word the “cowl”?  You have probably heard it before but, just like Adele’s last name, you don’t know exactly what it is. A cowl is actually the hood of a Dominican Friars’ robe. It also happens to be the name for our very own student-run school newspaper, The Cowl.

I applied to The Cowl after attending my first club fair as a freshman. I had done a little writing in high school and thought, “why not continue?” I was lucky enough to be chosen for the news section and immediately sent on my first assignment. Almost two years later, I am still writing and am now News co-Cowl2editor of my section.

For me, The Cowl is a hidden gem. In an age of great technology, we are always looking for news on our phones—the Internet and social media are right at our tips. But The Cowl is something special for the College. It’s written for PC students by PC students and looks at the ins and outs of our very own world.

The News Section has the investigators, who cover events and research issues on campus. Opinion expresses its own thoughts on everything from combating discrimination on campus to ranting about pre-season decorating. Arts and Entertainment gives us the latest on movies, plays, celebrities, TV shows, and hot food spots in the city. Portfolio is a creative writing section, Sports keeps us up to date with every team and its players, and photography captures everything happening on campus—it could even be what you are doing.

This past year was an exciting time for The Cowl, as we celebrated our 80th anniversary.

In honor of our big year, I looked back at one of the first issues of The Cowl. The front-page talked about the success of the football team, now non-existent, and the creation of a club hockey team, which would later become national champions. Other issues talked about Aquinas being turned into a girl’s dormitory when the College went co-ed, the celebration of another Oktoberfest in the fall, and the first females being part of the ROTC program.Cowl1

The Cowl is part of the tradition, history, and culture of a changing college that has allowed me to meet great people on staff, get involved in what’s happening around campus, and give students a voice.

In my two years here, I have tried many activities from ballroom dance to teaching English to Spanish speaking Ray workers. Some stuck with me and others did not work in my schedule or were not for me.  But the important thing is that I found things in the end that really made me part of the PC community. So as you look at the last few months of the school year, examine yourself. What have I tried? What have I wished that I had done? Try to go out and find something that fits you and become part of PC’s ongoing story.

 The Cowl is always looking for new writers and interested students can apply at thecowl.com. Stay in tune with what is happening around campus by going on thecowl.com, following our twitter @TheCowl, or picking up an issue every Thursday night!

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m... MORE

Wait..You’re an English Major?

Posted by: on December 4, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

 

When you’re in college, you always get asked, “What is your major?” My answer is English. The person usually follows up with “Oh, you want to be an English teacher?” When I answer no, I am not currently thinking about teaching, I get a confused look, a stare, and the inevitable question: What do you want to be then?

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked if I wanted to be an English teacher, I would be able to pay cash for my tuition this year. Being an English major, like any Humanities major, is outside of the box; usually business or biology are the go-to majors. And, for anyone who does not have the normal major or is undeclared, talking about a major can be stressful. You usually are having a chaotic day, filled with pop quizzes, hours of homework, and endless club meetings, when you suddenly have a freak-out—what am I going to do with my life? While everyone else seems to have a direction or career plan, you seem lost in the shuffle.  You ask yourself, what will I do after college? What will this degree do for me? Where is my life going? The already stressful day can quickly go further downhill.

But, after spending three semesters as an English major, I can honestly say I do not regret my decision. So far I have had great professors that care about their students and are passionate about the literature. The classes are filled with a mix of students, English and non-English majors, and we have great discussions and classes. Even something like an essay, which can be daunting to write, has allowed me to really express my own ideas and helped me improve as a student. I may be a little bias, but I think PC has an awesome English Department.

So you may be thinking, but what is her plan for the future? Well, that part I’m still trying to figure out. But for now, I’m happy to explore my options and stick to something I really love. I still have those “where is my life going” days, but they eventually pass and a good grade on a paper or great day in English class assures me that I’m in the right place. So, if you are ever stressed out about not having the perfect major or life-plan, don’t worry—you are certainly not alone.

On an unrelated note, good luck with finals! It can be tough to stay focused and get through the last minute work. Remember, there is an end in sight and we all feel your pain.

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GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m... MORE

And The Gold Medal Goes To…

Posted by: on November 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MackenzieTavellaGUEST BLOGGER: McKENZIE TAVELLA, ’18
My name is Mckenzie Tavella and I am from Fairfield, Connecticut. I am a sophomore at Providence College and am an English: Creative Writing and Psychology double major. Some of my favorite things are Harry Potter, both the series and the films, Marvel Superheroes, and sketching Disney cartoons. I love music, art and writing. However, more than anything, I love dogs.

 

I have to say that this fall in Friartown has been the best one yet. Although I am biased because fall is my favorite season, this one trumps all of the others. It could be because I currently have a class with the best teacher PC has to offer. His name is Professor Reeder, and I am sure you have heard of him some way or another. Unlike nearly everyone else at PC, I didn’t use the rate my professor website until recently. When students are preparing for registration, this is the website they turn to in order to see what their professors will be like. This can make or break a course. However, since I didn’t use it, getting Professor Reeder was pure luck. When I told my friends who I had for my 17th century class, one of them piped up and immediately said “Professor Reeder is THE man” and “You’re going to love him.” He told me to drop his name, “Johnny Smooth” and that Professor Reeder would remember him. He was right, about all of it. Professor Reeder is true to his 4.7 rating, but if you ask me, he’s a solid five. Not only does his personality brighten my Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 12:30-1:20, but he actually cares about the material of the class and the students he is teaching.

In addition to his stellar attitude, he is also very fair. He hands out a syllabus on the first day of class, andReeder sticks to what it says, only wavering if it benefits his class. He doesn’t surprise his class with a pop quiz, which is a much bigger curve ball than teachers let on. He also opens up his classes with light and free conversation, always giving us something to laugh about. One time, he even made the weather funny. If you are similar to me and didn’t know about rate my professor, I now know that it is accurate, so I recommend using it. It is a relief to know that the majority of PC students agree with me, since I couldn’t find a single negative review on Reeder. Reeder deserves more than a dedication, but a gold star that should be pinned on his daily sweaters. This way everyone in sight of him would know how great he is, without having to view a website for proof.

 

GUEST BLOGGER: McKENZIE TAVELLA, ’18 My name is Mckenzie Tavella and I am from Fairfield, Connecticut. I am a sophomore... MORE

Outlines: The GPS to Success

Posted by: on November 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

kristen-websiteGUEST BLOGGER:  KRISTEN PERRELLI, ’16
My name is Kristen Perrelli, and I am a junior at Providence College. I am a Social Work and Health Policy Management double major. When I am not tutoring you can find me in the Student Congress office, the second-floor library studying, or the Dunkin Donuts line contemplating whether I should buy green tea or ice coffee. I am contributing to PC Smarty Pants because of my position as an OAS writing tutor. This post will provide readers with a new spin on my favorite element of the writing process – the outline.

 

After deciding on a topic, generating ideas through brainstorming, and creating a working thesis, a writer’s last step in the pre-snoopywriting stage is to construct an outline. An outline provides the writer with a structural format through which he or she can categorize the main points, establish a concise direction for each paragraph, and ensure each idea can be expanded upon and fully developed.

A well-established outline provides the writer with a structural GPS that they can refer to for direction when deciding where to go next with their essay. A well-developed outline should include the thesis of the essay, the main topic of each paragraph, and supporting evidence.

In order to organize your thoughts, I recommend using note cards when outlining.

flashcards

Using note cards as an outline.

On the first note card place your thesis statement.

Then create a note card for each topic sentence. Next, I recommend writing on each topic sentence card a minimum of three details, facts, or evidence supporting your topic.

On the conclusion note card, rewrite your thesis and all of your topic sentences.  Note card outlining is a system that allows writers to think about and organize their paper through a step-by-step process.

The OAS Writing Center is available to help students at any stage of the writing process. The tutors in the Writing Center assist students through an approach to writing instruction that is student-centered. I believe all writers regardless of their ability can benefit from feedback from peer tutors. The Writing Center is open by appointment only Monday – Thursday: 8:30 am – 8:30 pm, Friday: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm and Sunday: 2:00 pm – 8:00 pm.

 

GUEST BLOGGER:  KRISTEN PERRELLI, ’16 My name is Kristen Perrelli, and I am a junior at Providence College. I am... MORE