My Ode to Ray

My Ode to Ray

Posted by: on May 3, 2016   |Comments (2)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

After another crazy year at Providence College, I am exited to be going home for a relaxing summer. I can’t wait to be reunited with my dog, my queen size bed, and, most importantly, my Mom’s delicious cooking. But before we all wrap up another semester, we need to pay homage to the thing we all love to hate—Ray.

As much as Ray tries, Mom’s lasagna with homemade sauce or her special fudge brownies will always take first place in our hearts. But as we eat our final meals of the year at Ray, there are special things I will definitely miss over the summer.

1. Breakfast

On the weekends, no one really wants to get up and move. It’s been a long week filled with exams, presentations, laundry, and roommates. I would rather stay in bed than walk to Ray. But this walk is made a little easier knowing that I will get a special breakfast. I love the French toast sticks, Belgium waffles, home fries, and, my favorite, hash. You can have eggs, sausage, bacon, bagels, fruit, omelets, etc. Breakfast at Ray is a bonus on the weekends.

2. Everyday Music

An average day at Ray will consist of country music on repeat. Love it or hate it, Carrie Underwood, Luke Bryan, and Keith Urban are coming your way.

3. Weekend Playlist

On Sunday mornings, the cowboy boots are put away and the club music enters the scene. All the songs you played the night before will be on in the background as you eat your waffles and eggs. Who doesn’t want to be like Kanye all morning long?

4. Familiar Faces

When you walk into Ray, you immediately get a smile from Fran or Dott or Barbara. These ladies of Ray, along with many others, are part of the PC experience. All around, from the salad bar to the classics section, you’ll see familiar faces. You might not even know all the workers’ names, but they are part of your everyday routine and are friendly faces on campus.

5. Holiday Spirit

For every holiday, Ray goes all out. Whether its singing Feliz Navidad behind the classics counter or wearing a costume for Halloween, they decorate the dining hall, make special foods, and put some spirit into a special day.

6. Thursdays

Despite anything that went wrong during the week, I can always count on a delicious meal of chicken nuggets and curly fries on Thursday. Who could ask for more?

7. The Dessert Table

This one is pretty self-explanatory. M&M cookies, chocolate cake, and ice cream—dreams really do come true.

8. The Center of the Day

Some days, especially at the end of the year, are super busy. I’m stuck in the library studying for hours or can be found running around campus for club meetings and office hours. It’ll be 6:30 and I haven’t even been back to my suite all day. But then I get the text to meet at Ray for dinner. My roommates, all seven of us, grab our usual table in the back and have dinner. For the next hour, we can vent about terrible days, rant about assignments that just seem cruel, plan our weekends, and just catch up.

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m... MORE

Role Reversal: From Tutee to Tutor

Posted by: on April 5, 2016   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

As my friends and I walked into Friar Ball, decked out in brand new dresses and painful yet beautiful heels, we were excited. All the upperclassmen we had talked to said the night was going to be one of best nights of our whole college career—no pressure there. Peterson was filled with hundreds of students, many of whom I had come to know in class or meeting through a club or even just saying ‘hi’ in the hallway. And while the night was a great night to spend time with my friends before they went home for the summer or traveled abroad, it also reminded me that in five weeks I was going to be halfway done with my college career.

It seems like only yesterday that I was struggling to read the RIPTA schedule, freaked out to walk around campus by myself, and always forgetting that Ray closes at 6:30 on the weekends and then being forced to walk to Alumni. In two years, I have become friends with people from all over the country (well, mostly the East Coast), joined different clubs, and explored a new city. As I got a little nostalgic and thought about my short journey at PC, I couldn’t help think of my experience at the Writing Center. Before I was a tutor helping with thesis statements and comma abuses, I was the one being tutored.

As a freshman I was intimidated by my professors and scared to write my first paper—what if these professors wanted something completely different than what I wrote in high school? Within the first month of school, I made an appointment for the Writing Center to get some help.

Going into a tutoring session can be nerve-wracking. What if my essay was terrible? What if I had a mean tutor? What if I couldn’t even find the Writing Center? I was already psyching myself out before the session started. Ali, then a junior writing tutor, ended up looking over my paper. I sat quietly as she looked everything over, not sure what to do in that awkward waiting time and internally cringing every time she made a mark. When she put her pen down, I was expecting the worst.

But the worst never came. Ali first pointed out what was great about my essay—my strong thesis and detailed examples. But we also talked about what could be improved. I needed to add a little more to my conclusion so it wasn’t just repeating my thesis. Yes, I was nervous throughout the whole session and probably didn’t take a calming breath until I left the library doors. But later I reflected on everything that happened and realized that it was really not a bad experience and was actually really helpful. I used the Writing Center for the rest of semester and had good, unique experiences with many different tutors.

Getting any critique can be difficult, especially by people you go to class with or see around campus. But lots of the tutors, like myself, were in your same exact spot. And before we were tutors, we were students. We have all been critiqued by professors or have struggled with a class or assignment. Coming into the Writing Center can be intimidating, scary, or just simply something new. But always remember that as tutors we are on your side and here to help you put the pieces together. And who knows—in time you might find your role has been reversed.

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m... MORE

And The Gold Medal Goes To…

Posted by: on November 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MackenzieTavellaGUEST BLOGGER: McKENZIE TAVELLA, ’18
My name is Mckenzie Tavella and I am from Fairfield, Connecticut. I am a sophomore at Providence College and am an English: Creative Writing and Psychology double major. Some of my favorite things are Harry Potter, both the series and the films, Marvel Superheroes, and sketching Disney cartoons. I love music, art and writing. However, more than anything, I love dogs.

 

I have to say that this fall in Friartown has been the best one yet. Although I am biased because fall is my favorite season, this one trumps all of the others. It could be because I currently have a class with the best teacher PC has to offer. His name is Professor Reeder, and I am sure you have heard of him some way or another. Unlike nearly everyone else at PC, I didn’t use the rate my professor website until recently. When students are preparing for registration, this is the website they turn to in order to see what their professors will be like. This can make or break a course. However, since I didn’t use it, getting Professor Reeder was pure luck. When I told my friends who I had for my 17th century class, one of them piped up and immediately said “Professor Reeder is THE man” and “You’re going to love him.” He told me to drop his name, “Johnny Smooth” and that Professor Reeder would remember him. He was right, about all of it. Professor Reeder is true to his 4.7 rating, but if you ask me, he’s a solid five. Not only does his personality brighten my Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 12:30-1:20, but he actually cares about the material of the class and the students he is teaching.

In addition to his stellar attitude, he is also very fair. He hands out a syllabus on the first day of class, andReeder sticks to what it says, only wavering if it benefits his class. He doesn’t surprise his class with a pop quiz, which is a much bigger curve ball than teachers let on. He also opens up his classes with light and free conversation, always giving us something to laugh about. One time, he even made the weather funny. If you are similar to me and didn’t know about rate my professor, I now know that it is accurate, so I recommend using it. It is a relief to know that the majority of PC students agree with me, since I couldn’t find a single negative review on Reeder. Reeder deserves more than a dedication, but a gold star that should be pinned on his daily sweaters. This way everyone in sight of him would know how great he is, without having to view a website for proof.

 

GUEST BLOGGER: McKENZIE TAVELLA, ’18 My name is Mckenzie Tavella and I am from Fairfield, Connecticut. I am a sophomore... MORE

Friar Family

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

ErinnMilesGUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16
Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. Passionate about education for all, equality for all, and daring greatly. Interests include good books, spending time with family and friends, travel, & breakfast, lunch and dinner. Good Samaritan. Proud younger sister and friend to amazing people. At PC, I am an Orientation Coordinator, Writing tutor, Admissions Ambassador, member of the 65th Student Congress Outreach Committee, and a Protégé mentor.

 

On Sunday, I helped facilitate the Junior Leadership Conference through the Student Congress Outreach Committee. For this event, high school juniors from all over Rhode Island were invited to campus for a day of workshops and learning more themselves as well as the college application process, and college in general. When I led a small group session about applying to colleges as well as involvement and how to have a successful college career, one student spoke up. He said that I had spoken so highly of PC and how easy my decision to attend Providence College seemed. The student asked, “What happens if you don’t get that ‘feeling’ of a perfect fit?” I was stopped in my tracks; I knew PC was the perfect fit for me because of so many reasons: the small community here is so inclusive, and I felt that before I was even a student. This community is still so inclusive, welcoming, and wonderful to me four years after I made the decision to attend here.

 

In light of the events surrounding the Friars winning the National Title this weekend and upcoming social events on and off campus, I hope to be assured of this community at PC. I’ve felt a part of the Friar Family since day one, and I would hope that this sense of community does not peter out over students’ frustrations.

 

We are all wonderful people; we each have done truly great things here and have amazing goals and prospects for our futures. Let’s remember how we all felt when we first stepped onto PC’s campus our first day as new students. Let’s remember how welcomed our Orientation Leaders made us feel, how our professors care about our future success, and how many resources are available to us on a daily basis.

 

As a valued member of our Friar Family, I plan on looking out for my friends and peers in the coming weeks, both in the classroom and outside of it; in the dorms and on the quad. I hope we can all do the same.

GUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16 Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. Passionate about education for all,... MORE

Dear Freshman Self

Posted by: on March 30, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

SGUEST BLOGGER: SARAH A. O’BRIEN ’15
Sarah is a Creative Writing major and Studio Art minor who will be graduating this May. She has been a Writing Tutor for the past three years, and helped to found the Writing Center’s Fiction Roundtable. Sarah serves as Managing Editor of PC’s literary journal, The Alembic. Her work has appeared in Every Day Poems, Snapping Twig, The Screech Owl, Copley Hall of Art, and is forthcoming in Hunt-Cavanagh Gallery. She loves wordplay, photography, and travel.

 

I like to think that I learned a thing or two during my four years as a Friar. Here’s what I would say to my freshman-year self. Since my time machine is broken, feel free to take my advice and use it to enhance your experiences at Providence College.

 

Dear Bright-Eyed-Freshman Sarah,

Look at you, finishing your first year of COLLEGE. Go friars. Now lie out on the quad with your LaSalle snickerdoodle coffee and listen carefully to these words of wisdom from your senior citizen self:

     1.  The Writing Center is the best place on campus.

Maybe I’m exaggerating. Then again, maybe not. This is the place where you will learn that helping students improve their writing is a passion of yours, and where you’ll meet amazing friends. Tell everyone you know to take advantage of this convenient peer-tutoring service.

     2.  Do. Not. Take. Two. English. Seminars. At. Once.

You’re going to think that you can handle two 400-level English seminars, on top of Civ and two studio art courses. Calm down. Somehow, you’ll end up surviving a 48-hour essay-writing marathon, but please, try to avoid this at all costs.

 

 

     3.  Studying abroad is worth every penny. And then some.

One of your most amazing experiences will be living in Florence, Italy in fall of junior year. Can’t afford your next meal? Don’t worry; some Italians will probably treat you to dinner. Do not be afraid to travel alone either—your solo adventures in Munich and Paris will be especially memorable.

 

 

     4.  Spend time with people who give you support and respect.

And just forget about those who don’t. Your true friends will be there for you when you need them. Also, don’t date anyone who doesn’t make you laugh or feel loved. You deserve the best so do not settle.

 

 

   5.  Party sober.

You’ll often go out sober, and sometimes you’ll even go out on your own. Guess what? Nobody notices or cares. Just be safe and have fun. When you do drink, don’t drink to get wasted. (You’re clumsy enough as it is.)

 

 

     6.  Ignore the haters.

Some people will question your decision to shave your head at the Relay for Life. Shake it off Swift-style and embrace the badass baldness; you won’t regret it. Along the same lines, never apologize for what you choose to wear and don’t compromise who you are for anyone.

 

 

     7.  Alternative Spring Break is a must.

You will get the opportunity to travel to Lima, Peru for spring break of sophomore year. Although very different from your freshman year alternative spring break trip to Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic, this week of volunteering will be just as life changing. You’ll be reminded to count your blessings.

 

 

     8.  Don’t leave your stuff unattended in the library. Or anywhere.

You will be lulled into a sense of security and trust within the PC campus bubble. Don’t be fooled. Your laptop will get stolen in the midst of finals week.

   

 

 9.  Take the C, go to office hours, and get involved.

A senior in the chapel basement will give you this advice. He will say that sometimes an event is worth prioritizing, even if that means “taking the C” on an exam or assignment. He’ll tell you to get to know your professors, since they want to know you. (Take a course with these gems: Chard deNiord, Dzvinia Orlowsky, Dr. Russell Hillier, Dr. Peter Costello, Heather McPherson, Dr. Eve Veliz, and Alison Espach.) Also, join campus clubs! Don’t get discouraged when certain groups reject you—you’ll find your niche.

 

 

     10.  Show Friar Pride.

Go to as many home games as you can. Be loud and proud. #ForeverAFriar

Sincerely,

Senior-in-Denial Sarah

GUEST BLOGGER: SARAH A. O’BRIEN ’15 Sarah is a Creative Writing major and Studio Art minor who will be graduating... MORE