Are you ready for some football?

Are you ready for some football?

Posted by: on February 2, 2017   |Comments (0)|Staff

Yes, Friars, it is Superbowl time.  And no matter who you are rooting for – Falcons, Patriots, Lady Gaga, or some delicious wings, there is something we need to discuss.

I’ve been chatting with students all week about Sunday.  And no, it’s not about what team will win, but rather, how will they schedule their time to study this weekend and enjoy the game with their friends.  Most students use Sundays as a day to get much of their studying done, so I challenge all of you to plan ahead.

If you are watching the game with friends (I recommend going to McPhail’s) be sure to get extra work done on Saturday and Sunday morning.  The key to success in college is managing your time – you manage your time best when you plan ahead and follow a schedule.  Create a to-do list for the weekend and guess how long it will take to complete each task.

 

So, plan ahead, enjoy the game with your friends, and GO PATS!*

 

 

*Full disclosure: this article may be slightly biased. 

Yes, Friars, it is Superbowl time.  And no matter who you are rooting for – Falcons, Patriots, Lady Gaga, or... MORE

Finals in Friartown – Games of Thrones Style

Posted by: on May 2, 2016   |Comments (0)|Staff

1. When your DWC professor gives the essay ahead of time.

 

2. When the line at Dunkin Donuts goes past the bookstore.

3. When you go to bed before 2am.

 

4. When classmates brag about how easy the final was.

 

5. When you attend a study session and know all the answers.

6. When you find an open seat in Club Phil.

 

7. When you start talking about the final with other students in the class and you realize you did not get the same answers.

 

8. When the highlight of your day is the free food from BOP’s study breaks.

 

9. When you walk out of your last final.

 

Best of luck with finals! Love, OAS

1. When your DWC professor gives the essay ahead of time.   2. When the line at Dunkin Donuts goes past... MORE

6 Essential Ways to Stand Out in a Group Interview

Posted by: on February 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Peer Mentoring

Many thanks to Mark Correia ’14, ’15G, Erinn Miles ’16, and Melissa Sheil ’16 for their suggestions and personal experiences!

It is that time of the semester where there is excitement in the air and I’m not talking about our basketball team.  Students are starting the interviewing process for various clubs and positions on campus.  So whether you want to be an Orientation Leader, a Writing Tutor or an RA, please remember the following advice….

Social Media Image
This one can be tricky, but be aware of what your Twitter/Instagram says about you (even if it is blocked).  Tweeting about how wasted you got on a snow day is not a good look – for any position on-campus.  In a few years, you will graduate and look for a job so start thinking about your brand now.  If you put up goofy videos on YouTube, take them down.  That meme about Trump that you think is funny (but also somewhat racist), take it down. Tweeting about your annoying professor may be hilarious to your friends, but how does it look to an administrator looking to fill a position?

Group Interviews – With Friends or Strangers?
For group interviews, there are 5-6 other students all vying for the same spot and then there are a few current members asking questions and writing down your responses – it can be super intimidating.  Most students claim that it is better to interview with people they don’t know (as opposed to fighting over a spot with their friends) but the choice is yours.  Would you feel more or less comfortable highlighting your accomplishments (or failures) with your friends?  Also, some students claim that it’s best to sign up for the last group interview time so you can make a final impression right before decisions are made.  I don’t know how much truth there is to that, but I’ll pass that tip along.

Be Engaged
While other students are talking, be careful to listen and not mentally zone out.  Pay attention to other students responses and look happy to be interviewing for the position- it says a lot about how you work in a team and how engaged you will be in the position.  And if another student answers a question poorly, try not to make a face or roll your eyes.

Prep Work
While this may seem obvious, be sure to really prepare.  You will be asked tough questions (How do you respond to a resident that has been drinking?) so the more you think about your responses, the more calm and prepared you will be.  Write down your thoughts on your leadership style, what strengths you bring to an organization, etc.  Also, do a quick google search for Student Leadership Interview Questions to start thinking of how you would answer those questions.

Show Up
Often times, with group interviews you get to select a time.  When you sign up for that time, be sure to write it down in your planner/phone so you don’t forget it.  Missing your interview is a big no-no, but I’ve seen it happen.

Sell Yourself
Do not be afraid to showcase your achievements.  The key is to do so without sounding overconfident (this is where it is important to do the prep work).  Most of the positions you will be interviewing are positions of leadership, and so you need to show that during your interview. While it’s normal to get nervous, be sure to speak up!

What are your best strategies for a successful group interview?

campusinterview

Many thanks to Mark Correia ’14, ’15G, Erinn Miles ’16, and Melissa Sheil ’16 for their suggestions and personal experiences!... MORE

The War Against All Nighters

Posted by: on October 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Study Skills

With mid-terms underway, so does the endless boasting about all nighters. spongebobIt has become part of college culture to brag about the lack of sleep one received while cramming for an exam.  All-nighters are so ingrained in our society, that it has almost become a right of passage.  I’m here to tell you this insanity must stop!

All nighters do terrible things to your body.  All nighters increase your stress level and affect your ability to multi-task. Sleep deprivation makes you increasingly irrational (cranky and moody) and scientists from Stanford and the University of Wisconsin noticed that after one night of little to no sleep, a person’s body mass index increases.  Yes, all-nighters makes you hungry and gain weight. Still think they are so cool?

 

Well, the main reason against all-nighters is, wait for it, they do not work.  You pull an all-nighters to study or write a paper, but the lack of sleep impairs attention and working memory – two things you need to perform well.  So, you waited to the last minute to study for that Finance test – what should you do?  First, come by OAS so we can discuss some wonderful time management strategies. 🙂  Next, break down the material into 2 blocks of time – one to study as much as you can (at night), then sleep for 6 hours, and then study the other half of the material (waking up early).  The actual time dedicated to studying may be less than the anticipated all nighter, but the quality of studying and retention of material is higher.

If you prefer this information broken down into witty cultural references and gifs, check out Buzzfeed and The 10 Horrible Things Pulling An All-Nighter Does to Your Body.  Or HerCampus, USA Today, Teen VOGUE, or The Atlantic.

Or listen to Bethany and just go to sleep!

With mid-terms underway, so does the endless boasting about all nighters. It has become part of college culture to brag... MORE

Don’t Read Over Your Notes

Posted by: on April 30, 2015   |Comment (1)|Study Skills

As we enter the final week of the semester, students often discuss how the are preparing for their finals.  I have many discussions with students regarding how they plan on studying for their exams.  Below is a reenactment of some of the conversations (with my secret inner reactions) that I’ve had over the past week.

Me: So, you have your DWC final next week – how do you plan on studying?
Student:  Oh, I’m going to review and re-read my notes.

(and on the inside I’m like)

 

Me: OK – Any plans on making a study guide with friends?
Student:  No – I have really great notes so I will read them over.

(and on the inside I cry a little)

 

Me:  What about studying with friends?  Going over the material as a group and discussing possible questions?
Student: Eh, no.  I like to study alone.

(now I begin to wonder if I’m bad at my job – have I taught these students nothing?)

 

Me:  OK, well in addition to reading over you notes, have you thought about making flash cards?
Student:  Oh no, I don’t like flash cards.

 (OK, I give up)

Obviously, this is an exaggerated version of conversations but I wanted to point out something – reading over your notes is not enough preparation for an exam.  When preparing for an exam, you need to have some method to ‘check-in’ to ensure you are adequately retaining the information.  Creating study guides, using flash cards, or studying with friends are some ways to see if you are remembering the information and making connections.  Find a method that works for you but remember – reading over your notes is not enough!

As we enter the final week of the semester, students often discuss how the are preparing for their finals.  I... MORE