The Suite Life For Seven

The Suite Life For Seven

Posted by: on January 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

 

 

When I tell people I live in a seven-person suite, with six other girls, they usually look a little shocked. They question, “seven girls? In one room? How does that work?” And while I try to explain that its organized chaos, they usually look a little unconvinced (and probably thankful that they have fewer roommates).

Living with seven girls in a suite is an experience: it has its ups and downs, great moments and struggles, and lots of fun in between. Here are seven things I learned from living the “Suite” life with seven girls.

1. There is seven of everything (and maybe more)

If you look at our bathroom vanity you will find seven hair straighteners…and seven curlers…and seven of pretty much everything. Move in day, the Hunger Games of rooms, was chaotic. Boxes were everywhere, everything was piled high, and the amount of stuff we owned seemed endless—it was surprising we even fit it into our cars. A semester later and the stuff has only multiplied. And while it can easily turn messy, it also means we have everything covered. We of course have necessities (mainly food), but we also have everything you never dreamed you needed (and probably still don’t). But you never know when you need a pizza cutter, mini hand weights, Santa Clause sticky notes, a mini-tree, or a soda-making machine.

2.  A person for everything

No matter how much you enjoy College or school in general, you are bound to have a tough day. It gets stressful, confusing, and just plain difficult. During the good and bad times, you need someone to celebrate or cry with. Luckily with seven girls, you have the perfect people to help. One roommate you vent to and let out your anger, while another you just ignore reality and instead watch Netflix. There’s always a person to go on an adventure with, to stay home with and watch a movie, or to make an impromptu trip to Dunkin.

3.  There is hair everywhere…

I guess it’s assumed that seven girls equal a lot of hair. Forewarning: it doesn’t matter how much you vacuum, it will always be there. Just embrace it.

4.  The art of love and hate

Living with six of your best friends is great—you have great dance parties at midnight, laugh all the time, and you pretty much get to know them better than you know yourself. But that certainly does not mean it’s easy. No matter how much you love your friends, sometimes you need a break from each other. I quickly discovered you have to let the little things go—there are more important things to worry about. You also have to address the big issues—no one enjoys passive aggressive attitudes or an unhappy living space. They’re your roomies for better or for worse.

5.  Built-in squad

Forget Taylor Swift and her super model friends—you’ve got the real gems by your side. Everywhere you go you have six friends to accompany you. A cheering squad at basketball games, a full table of friends at dinner, and a mini-party wherever you are.

6.  Birthdays are awesome

Your birthday is your special to just celebrate you. With six girls that all know different sides of you, they’ll know exactly how to make that day special. We’ve celebrated three birthdays so far (including mine), and they’ve been some of our best memories of the semester (Shout out to my girls for the delicious chocolate, our trip to the Cheesecake Factory, and all the surprises).

7.  Embrace the little moments

Everyone is so busy during the week: class, meetings, work, homework, sleep, etc. We barely see each other and when we do, we are exhausted and ready to sleep. But the little parts of living together, staying up late to wish someone a happy birthday at exactly midnight, catching up at dinner, or just watching Scandal Thursday nights, are great. Sadly, we only have so many years that we get to spend together. So in between running in and out of your dorm, try to take a few moments to talk to your roommates. They’ll make you happy and one day, even if not right now, you’ll definitely miss them.

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m... MORE

Doing More Than Getting Through: Enjoying the PC Experience

Posted by: on November 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

Today, like any day, I groaned when I heard my alarm go off. I might hit snooze once or twice before I decide, despite my greatest wishes, I have to actually get up for class. From there, the day seems never-ending. Getting stressed out is inevitable because there’s always a paper due, there’s always a pop quiz on the horizon, and there’s always Civ reading-seriously, Civ takes over your life. There is barely enough time to finish my homework, never mind sleep.

I think every college student has stress weeks like this. It can be hard to take a moment for yourself and regain your sanity. So how do we survive the rest of the semester? Well, I could tell you lots of tips on how to stay calm and get prepared, things like getting organized, taking breaks while studying, making to do lists, etc. (which are all very important things you should consider!).

Gagne1

Go Friars!

But, I think there’s something else we need to keep in mind beyond how busy we are.

We only have four years at PC. If you talk to any senior, they will say how lucky you are to be a freshman and how they wish they could do it all over again. It’s easy to get caught up in  everyday life. I know I am more concerned with when I can actually get some sleep than enjoying the moment. But, even though things are crazy busy, we also have to appreciate our short time here because it’s just that- short.

With fall finally here, we can finally see how pretty the campus is. The squirrels are attacking you with acorns, but the leaves are beautiful. I always look forward to chicken nugget Thursdays and a hello from Dot. And how many college students get to say that they watch the men’s national hockey champions play on the weekend?

Gagne3

Waterfire in Dowtown Providence

Some of my best PC moments are just hanging out with my friends. We’re probably doing nothing special, but having a great time doing it. It’s weird to think, but in a few years we won’t be in the same state, nevermind in the same room. So, we have to take advantage of our time to get a quick snack at LaSalle Bakery, take the zipcar for an impromptu road trip, or do a classic movie night. And don’t forget the city of Providence! Dinners at the Cheesecake are Heaven (get the chocolate cake), Waterfire is a cool night out, and who doesn’t love to go for a shopping trip at the mall?

Class itself can be difficult—homework, perfect grades, and trying to figure out what you want to do with the rest of your life. But, PC is full of great professors, classes that get you talking, and lots of resources (like Tutoring and Writing Centers—come visit us!).

I will be the first to agree that school is stressful. I’m definitely guilty of just trying to “get through the week.” But, as sophomore year quickly passes by, I also realize my experience is not going to last forever. Some weeks will be crazy, but try not to just “get through” every week.  PC is a great place and you don’t want to miss out on your chance to experience it!

Gagne2

 

 

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m... MORE

You Get the Best Out of Others When You Give the Best of Yourself

Posted by: on April 21, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

MelissaSheilGUEST BLOGGER:  MELISSA SHEIL, ’16
Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I am a Protege Mentor and this past summer I worked as a Resident Assistant/Mentor in the Friar Foundations Program. I serve as a Research Assistant in Providence College’s Social Perceptions and Attitudes Lab, and am most interested in studying academic achievement. I am an Admissions Ambassador, Special Olympics Volunteer and will be volunteering on my third Habitat for Humanity trip this Spring Break! When I’m not watching PC Basketball or Hockey games, you can find me playing intramurals (and still trying to win a t-shirt)!

 

As a Head Tutor, I have had the privilege of interviewing several prospective tutors over the past few weeks. The Tutoring Center consists of a community of tutors who are engaged and excited to help their peers, so it is fitting that one of the questions that we always ask a prospective tutor is “What excites you most about possibly being hired as a tutor?”

Although responses varied, they all shared one common underlying theme: the prospective tutor was most excited about being able to serve their peers through tutoring.

Tutoring requires both the tutor and the tutee be engaged and present throughout the session in order to best serve the student. Tutors must come to the session prepared to help the student better understand the topic they are studying, while also creating an environment where the tutee feels comfortable to be able to ask for further explanation or to say that they are completely confused by the material. Simply put, tutoring requires that the tutor is dedicated to putting in the extra effort by giving the best of themselves every time they tutor in order to best help the student they are serving.

As a college student, I understand that sometimes it can be difficult to always give your all in everything you do. Whether it be because of a lack of sleep or a hectic schedule, there are always occasions where it is difficult to motivate yourself to be your best. However, Harvey S. Firestone’s quote that reads, “You get the best out of others when you give the best of yourself” truly emphasizes that while you are in a role that requires you to serve another, it is necessary to put in the extra effort to show that you value those you are working with.

Whether you are a tutor, a resident assistant, a peer mentor, a teacher’s assistant, an orientation leader or just consider yourself a member of the Friar Family, chances are that you hold some role on campus that requires you to serve others. So while you are in that role, remember to give the best of yourself by showing an interest in the group you are serving, accepting the group you are serving, and being engaged and present throughout the time you are serving. As members of the Friar Family, it is our responsibility to give the best of ourselves in order to get the best out of others.

 

GUEST BLOGGER:  MELISSA SHEIL, ’16 Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am... MORE

Friar Family

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

ErinnMilesGUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16
Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. Passionate about education for all, equality for all, and daring greatly. Interests include good books, spending time with family and friends, travel, & breakfast, lunch and dinner. Good Samaritan. Proud younger sister and friend to amazing people. At PC, I am an Orientation Coordinator, Writing tutor, Admissions Ambassador, member of the 65th Student Congress Outreach Committee, and a Protégé mentor.

 

On Sunday, I helped facilitate the Junior Leadership Conference through the Student Congress Outreach Committee. For this event, high school juniors from all over Rhode Island were invited to campus for a day of workshops and learning more themselves as well as the college application process, and college in general. When I led a small group session about applying to colleges as well as involvement and how to have a successful college career, one student spoke up. He said that I had spoken so highly of PC and how easy my decision to attend Providence College seemed. The student asked, “What happens if you don’t get that ‘feeling’ of a perfect fit?” I was stopped in my tracks; I knew PC was the perfect fit for me because of so many reasons: the small community here is so inclusive, and I felt that before I was even a student. This community is still so inclusive, welcoming, and wonderful to me four years after I made the decision to attend here.

 

In light of the events surrounding the Friars winning the National Title this weekend and upcoming social events on and off campus, I hope to be assured of this community at PC. I’ve felt a part of the Friar Family since day one, and I would hope that this sense of community does not peter out over students’ frustrations.

 

We are all wonderful people; we each have done truly great things here and have amazing goals and prospects for our futures. Let’s remember how we all felt when we first stepped onto PC’s campus our first day as new students. Let’s remember how welcomed our Orientation Leaders made us feel, how our professors care about our future success, and how many resources are available to us on a daily basis.

 

As a valued member of our Friar Family, I plan on looking out for my friends and peers in the coming weeks, both in the classroom and outside of it; in the dorms and on the quad. I hope we can all do the same.

GUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16 Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. Passionate about education for all,... MORE

“Float With the Tide, or Swim For a Goal”

Posted by: on March 16, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

ErinnMilesGUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16
Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. I enjoy watching the Friars play with heart and soul, long walks to the fridge, and equality and education for all. Trying to elevate small talk into talking about big ideas, one conversation at a time. At PC, I am an Orientation Coordinator, Writing Tutor, Admissions Ambassador, member of the 65th Student Congress, and a Protégé mentor.

 

 

 

Hunter S. Thompson has been an author and modern philosopher of sorts who has made me question what I know. Thompson authored the book about Hell’s Angels in the 1960s, for which he lived and rode with this biker gang for over a year. Thompson also was a counter cultural figure, questioning posh events such as the Kentucky Derby, as well as President Nixon’s career and morals before he assumed the presidency (what a prediction!). Through questioning the status quo and being an honest and eloquent writer, Thompson became an internationally famous author and journalist. When he was 20, he penned this quote in a letter to a friend:

“Whether to float with the tide, or to swim for a goal. It is a choice we must all make consciously or unconsciously at one time in our lives.”

I think this quote is important to all of us as students at this time in our lives. Sure, it was probably assumed that we would attend some college, get a degree, find a good job post-grad, continue working, maybe get married, maybe have kids, possibly retire at 65, and then die. This boring plateau never has spikes or dips; it’s just that—boring. Unbeknownst to me, because of Providence College and the opportunities I have been afforded, I have found my way off this boring one-way street toward my tombstone.

It was not really until Christmas at my grandmother’s house this past December that I realized this. When two of my eleven aunts and uncles (I’m an Irish Catholic…) began to ask me what I wanted to do after graduation, I blurted out that I wanted to work in Student Development in Higher Education. Excuse me? I hadn’t put that sentence together ever before, and here I was giving myself a new work title for 18 months down the road. Because of PC and the decision I made to come here, I now know that I am capable and able to do almost anything I want to because of these opportunities granted to me.

Daily, we face hundreds of minute decisions: what to wear for the day, which path to take to class, if you’ll have a long or a short conversation with Dot. However, we also face a few influential decisions to make every day that we probably don’t even realize. How we speak to one another, if we stop to reflect on our day, if we take the time to truly communicate and engage with our fellow friars. These small decisions establish if we’re floating with the tide and following the status quo, or if we decide to swim for a goal and truly be vulnerable and authentic citizens.

Because of this quote and Thompson’s important work, I attempt to swim for a goal daily, to swim against the current and not always do the popular thing.

Will you?

GUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16 Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. I enjoy watching the Friars... MORE