My Ode to Ray

My Ode to Ray

Posted by: on May 3, 2016   |Comments (2)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

After another crazy year at Providence College, I am exited to be going home for a relaxing summer. I can’t wait to be reunited with my dog, my queen size bed, and, most importantly, my Mom’s delicious cooking. But before we all wrap up another semester, we need to pay homage to the thing we all love to hate—Ray.

As much as Ray tries, Mom’s lasagna with homemade sauce or her special fudge brownies will always take first place in our hearts. But as we eat our final meals of the year at Ray, there are special things I will definitely miss over the summer.

1. Breakfast

On the weekends, no one really wants to get up and move. It’s been a long week filled with exams, presentations, laundry, and roommates. I would rather stay in bed than walk to Ray. But this walk is made a little easier knowing that I will get a special breakfast. I love the French toast sticks, Belgium waffles, home fries, and, my favorite, hash. You can have eggs, sausage, bacon, bagels, fruit, omelets, etc. Breakfast at Ray is a bonus on the weekends.

2. Everyday Music

An average day at Ray will consist of country music on repeat. Love it or hate it, Carrie Underwood, Luke Bryan, and Keith Urban are coming your way.

3. Weekend Playlist

On Sunday mornings, the cowboy boots are put away and the club music enters the scene. All the songs you played the night before will be on in the background as you eat your waffles and eggs. Who doesn’t want to be like Kanye all morning long?

4. Familiar Faces

When you walk into Ray, you immediately get a smile from Fran or Dott or Barbara. These ladies of Ray, along with many others, are part of the PC experience. All around, from the salad bar to the classics section, you’ll see familiar faces. You might not even know all the workers’ names, but they are part of your everyday routine and are friendly faces on campus.

5. Holiday Spirit

For every holiday, Ray goes all out. Whether its singing Feliz Navidad behind the classics counter or wearing a costume for Halloween, they decorate the dining hall, make special foods, and put some spirit into a special day.

6. Thursdays

Despite anything that went wrong during the week, I can always count on a delicious meal of chicken nuggets and curly fries on Thursday. Who could ask for more?

7. The Dessert Table

This one is pretty self-explanatory. M&M cookies, chocolate cake, and ice cream—dreams really do come true.

8. The Center of the Day

Some days, especially at the end of the year, are super busy. I’m stuck in the library studying for hours or can be found running around campus for club meetings and office hours. It’ll be 6:30 and I haven’t even been back to my suite all day. But then I get the text to meet at Ray for dinner. My roommates, all seven of us, grab our usual table in the back and have dinner. For the next hour, we can vent about terrible days, rant about assignments that just seem cruel, plan our weekends, and just catch up.

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered […]MORE

The Suite Life For Seven

Posted by: on January 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

MarlaGagneGUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18
Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered with campus ministry and love getting involved on campus. College life can be crazy, but chicken nugget Thursdays, Friday night hockey games, and PC friends make it all worth it!

 

 

 

When I tell people I live in a seven-person suite, with six other girls, they usually look a little shocked. They question, “seven girls? In one room? How does that work?” And while I try to explain that its organized chaos, they usually look a little unconvinced (and probably thankful that they have fewer roommates).

Living with seven girls in a suite is an experience: it has its ups and downs, great moments and struggles, and lots of fun in between. Here are seven things I learned from living the “Suite” life with seven girls.

1. There is seven of everything (and maybe more)

If you look at our bathroom vanity you will find seven hair straighteners…and seven curlers…and seven of pretty much everything. Move in day, the Hunger Games of rooms, was chaotic. Boxes were everywhere, everything was piled high, and the amount of stuff we owned seemed endless—it was surprising we even fit it into our cars. A semester later and the stuff has only multiplied. And while it can easily turn messy, it also means we have everything covered. We of course have necessities (mainly food), but we also have everything you never dreamed you needed (and probably still don’t). But you never know when you need a pizza cutter, mini hand weights, Santa Clause sticky notes, a mini-tree, or a soda-making machine.

2.  A person for everything

No matter how much you enjoy College or school in general, you are bound to have a tough day. It gets stressful, confusing, and just plain difficult. During the good and bad times, you need someone to celebrate or cry with. Luckily with seven girls, you have the perfect people to help. One roommate you vent to and let out your anger, while another you just ignore reality and instead watch Netflix. There’s always a person to go on an adventure with, to stay home with and watch a movie, or to make an impromptu trip to Dunkin.

3.  There is hair everywhere…

I guess it’s assumed that seven girls equal a lot of hair. Forewarning: it doesn’t matter how much you vacuum, it will always be there. Just embrace it.

4.  The art of love and hate

Living with six of your best friends is great—you have great dance parties at midnight, laugh all the time, and you pretty much get to know them better than you know yourself. But that certainly does not mean it’s easy. No matter how much you love your friends, sometimes you need a break from each other. I quickly discovered you have to let the little things go—there are more important things to worry about. You also have to address the big issues—no one enjoys passive aggressive attitudes or an unhappy living space. They’re your roomies for better or for worse.

5.  Built-in squad

Forget Taylor Swift and her super model friends—you’ve got the real gems by your side. Everywhere you go you have six friends to accompany you. A cheering squad at basketball games, a full table of friends at dinner, and a mini-party wherever you are.

6.  Birthdays are awesome

Your birthday is your special to just celebrate you. With six girls that all know different sides of you, they’ll know exactly how to make that day special. We’ve celebrated three birthdays so far (including mine), and they’ve been some of our best memories of the semester (Shout out to my girls for the delicious chocolate, our trip to the Cheesecake Factory, and all the surprises).

7.  Embrace the little moments

Everyone is so busy during the week: class, meetings, work, homework, sleep, etc. We barely see each other and when we do, we are exhausted and ready to sleep. But the little parts of living together, staying up late to wish someone a happy birthday at exactly midnight, catching up at dinner, or just watching Scandal Thursday nights, are great. Sadly, we only have so many years that we get to spend together. So in between running in and out of your dorm, try to take a few moments to talk to your roommates. They’ll make you happy and one day, even if not right now, you’ll definitely miss them.

GUEST BLOGGER: MARLA GAGNE, ‘ 18 Hi everyone! My name is Marla Gagne, and I’m from West Haven, Connecticut. I’m a sophomore English major and am currently living the suite-life on campus (pun intended). I am a news co-editor on The Cowl and love writing stories about what’s going on around PC. I’ve also volunteered […]MORE

Rolling Through Life

Posted by: on September 22, 2015   |Comments (0)|Disability Support Services

GUEST BLOGGER: CISCO OLLER, ’16
My name is Francisco Oller, I am a Senior Management Major and I was born with a rare genetic disease called Pelizaeus Merzbacher. My disability has made me into a determined and courageous person. I was born in Puerto Rico and I have lived there until I came to Providence College. My goal in life is to be successful in all that I may pursue and never let my physical limitations deter me from enjoying life.

GUEST BLOGGER: CISCO OLLER, ’16 My name is Francisco Oller, I am a Senior Management Major and I was born with a rare genetic disease called Pelizaeus Merzbacher. My disability has made me into a determined and courageous person. I was born in Puerto Rico and I have lived there until I came to Providence College. […]MORE

5 Things I Wish I Knew as a Freshmen

Posted by: on September 18, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

JenniferGilliganGUEST BLOGGER: JENNY GILLIGAN, ’18
Hey Fellow Friars! My name is Jenny Gilligan, and I am from South Windsor, Connecticut. I am a sophomore here at Providence College, with a major in Finance and minor in Spanish. Unfortunately, being a declared major does not correlate to having any clue what career path you aspire to follow. I am a first year tutor in OAS, tutoring Economics, Calculus, and Spanish, and am very excited to learn a lot from working as a tutor! I play on PC’s first ever club lacrosse team, and also participate in campus ministry. I look forward to getting more involved in the PC community as a Sophomore, because anyone that know me will tell you, I am very proud to be a friar.

 

If your anything like I was as a freshmen, you may have been so excited for all things college, that you may have failed to acknowledge that no matter how well you adjusted to college life, it would still be just that; an adjustment. Even though I had seen my four older sisters go through the adjustment to college, there were certain things I wished they had told me. So here are a few of the most valuable lessons I learned throughout my first year at Providence College.

 

1.  Office hours are not scary

I remember being terrified that if I went to office hours I would ask all the wrong questions, or the professor would have no desire to talk to me and be totally un-helpful. This is a huge myth. If you do anything, go to office hours. At the very least your professor will be impressed that you showed up as soon as you had a problem. Trust me, initiative is rewarded.

 

2.  College is NOT the era of Netflix

Most likely, you have friends like mine that told you how much Netflix they watched their freshman year. Well this may be true, it doesn’t have to be, and shouldn’t be, true for you. Luckily, I learned this was not my reality pretty quickly. Long hours in the Library are unavoidable, but are a lot more bearable when you know you are leaving to go hangout with your friends, or at least watch Netflix with your friends. College is going to be so much more enjoyable with a great group of friends to rely on, so shut your laptop, turn of Friends, and go make some Friends. It’s not as hard as you may think.

 

3.  Using a tutor does not make you stupid

I guarantee you at some point this year you will have a subject, or a concept, that may not come as easily to you. Luckily, you’re at Providence College and have helpful resources all around. Don’t be embarrassed to use a tutor, because chances are you’re tutor has used a tutor in the Office of Academic Services at least once. I’ve learned that there is no greater help than a student who went through that very same class and had the very same questions. If you’re downstairs in the library struggling with you’re work, do your self a favor, walk upstairs and make an appointment. You’ll thank me later!

 

4.  You may not be as busy as you think you are

Yes you have a lot of homework. But yes, you have for time for that one club you really wanted to join even though it meets twice a week, and yes, you do have time for church. Maybe the girls on your floor aren’t going to be your best friends, but that one girl you sit next to every meeting will be. You never know, so get involved! You won’t regret it! Maybe you went to church every weekend at home, or maybe you didn’t. But if it is 10 o’clock in a Sunday night, your just finished your work and you are choosing between that episode of Orange is The New Black, and going to 10:30 mass, the answer is always mass. It’s the perfect way to let go of the stress of one week, and energize for the next. Always avoid excuses!

 

5.  Call your mother

Yes, she probably will ask you when the last time you washed your sheets was, or when the last time you went to church was, but she also may have some good advice. Having a small roommate problem? Chances are, she had those in college too, and she also knows everything about you, especially your most annoying traits. Meaning, she will tell you if you’re being unrealistic and need to quickly change your ways. Or maybe you have a sore throat and are avoiding solving the problem because you don’t know where health services is; you’re mom will tell you to get down there within the next hour, and you will listen. You’re mom is your biggest supporter, and you’re toughest critic. College requires both.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GUEST BLOGGER: JENNY GILLIGAN, ’18 Hey Fellow Friars! My name is Jenny Gilligan, and I am from South Windsor, Connecticut. I am a sophomore here at Providence College, with a major in Finance and minor in Spanish. Unfortunately, being a declared major does not correlate to having any clue what career path you aspire to […]MORE

You Get the Best Out of Others When You Give the Best of Yourself

Posted by: on April 21, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

MelissaSheilGUEST BLOGGER:  MELISSA SHEIL, ’16
Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I am a Protege Mentor and this past summer I worked as a Resident Assistant/Mentor in the Friar Foundations Program. I serve as a Research Assistant in Providence College’s Social Perceptions and Attitudes Lab, and am most interested in studying academic achievement. I am an Admissions Ambassador, Special Olympics Volunteer and will be volunteering on my third Habitat for Humanity trip this Spring Break! When I’m not watching PC Basketball or Hockey games, you can find me playing intramurals (and still trying to win a t-shirt)!

 

As a Head Tutor, I have had the privilege of interviewing several prospective tutors over the past few weeks. The Tutoring Center consists of a community of tutors who are engaged and excited to help their peers, so it is fitting that one of the questions that we always ask a prospective tutor is “What excites you most about possibly being hired as a tutor?”

Although responses varied, they all shared one common underlying theme: the prospective tutor was most excited about being able to serve their peers through tutoring.

Tutoring requires both the tutor and the tutee be engaged and present throughout the session in order to best serve the student. Tutors must come to the session prepared to help the student better understand the topic they are studying, while also creating an environment where the tutee feels comfortable to be able to ask for further explanation or to say that they are completely confused by the material. Simply put, tutoring requires that the tutor is dedicated to putting in the extra effort by giving the best of themselves every time they tutor in order to best help the student they are serving.

As a college student, I understand that sometimes it can be difficult to always give your all in everything you do. Whether it be because of a lack of sleep or a hectic schedule, there are always occasions where it is difficult to motivate yourself to be your best. However, Harvey S. Firestone’s quote that reads, “You get the best out of others when you give the best of yourself” truly emphasizes that while you are in a role that requires you to serve another, it is necessary to put in the extra effort to show that you value those you are working with.

Whether you are a tutor, a resident assistant, a peer mentor, a teacher’s assistant, an orientation leader or just consider yourself a member of the Friar Family, chances are that you hold some role on campus that requires you to serve others. So while you are in that role, remember to give the best of yourself by showing an interest in the group you are serving, accepting the group you are serving, and being engaged and present throughout the time you are serving. As members of the Friar Family, it is our responsibility to give the best of ourselves in order to get the best out of others.

 

GUEST BLOGGER:  MELISSA SHEIL, ’16 Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I […]MORE