Spring Break is Over

Spring Break is Over

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Staff

GUEST BLOGGER: MANUELA BARCELOS
Manuela is the ESL/Academic Skills Specialist in the OAS.  When she is not working, she enjoys spending time with family, leisurely dinners with friends, and keeping up with all the NBC Chicago episodes.

You looked forward to the much-awaited week of spring break. The anticipation mounted as the days drew nearer and then…it was over before you could say “tequila!” Now, the transition to the routine you eagerly left behind before break seems like a form of human torture.  How do you get back on that proverbial hamster wheel?

REFLECT:  Take the time to realize that spring break was just what the doctor ordered. You may be coming off of spring break feeling like you should’ve accomplished some school work or that you slept more than you should have. Lose the guilt. You needed the time to recoup and if you slept more than usual, that was your body telling you that it was time to recharge. Be grateful for the R&R you got over break. Don’t get caught up in useless regrets over not having gotten any work done. That time is gone and you can’t get it back. It’s more fruitful to think about how to get on track again.

TAKE BABY STEPS:   You may not feel immediately motivated to hit the books, so take small steps toward getting in gear. You can start by unpacking. Leaving your unpacked bags lying around will only remind you of your long lost spring break. Get some laundry done. Put all your toiletries away, etc. Maybe even run an errand or two.

PLAN AHEAD:  As you think about what lies ahead for the remainder of the semester, it all seems like work work work work work!  Before the nostalgia of your spring break creeps in, get out your calendar. Plan for the week ahead. Make some room in your calendar for small rewards to look forward to soon. For example, pencil in some study breaks throughout the week in which you can indulge in some of Ray’s delights like FroYo, chicken nugget day, or make your own s’mores. Once you get through your first week back, plan an outing on the weekend with friends – maybe a trip to the movies or your favorite burger spot. These may pale in comparison to the week you just had in Cancun or vegging back home, but they will get you through until your next break.

Speaking of your next break…while you are updating your calendar, plug in your 5-day Easter Recess. And when that’s over there are only 26 days left before the official end of the semester. But who’s counting, right?

 

Adapted from:  Jimenez, R. (2015, March 17). Post spring break: getting back into the groove. KTB.

Retrieved from http://killingthebreeze.com/post-spring-break-getting-back-groove/

GUEST BLOGGER: MANUELA BARCELOS Manuela is the ESL/Academic Skills Specialist in the OAS.  When she is not working, she enjoys spending time with family, leisurely dinners with friends, and keeping up with all the NBC Chicago episodes. You looked forward to the much-awaited week of spring break. The anticipation mounted as the days drew nearer […]MORE

Spring Semester – Now What?

Posted by: on February 3, 2015   |Comments (0)|Study Skills

christina-perri-blogGUEST BLOGGER: CHRISTINA PERRI
Hello Friartown! My name is Christina Perri, and I am a junior from Long Island, New York. I am a biology and psychology double major with a minor in neuroscience, and a member of the Liberal Arts Honors Program. I work in the OAS Tutoring Center primarily as a CIV tutor, and I dabble in other subjects as needed. When I’m not in class, lab, or OAS, I can be found singing with Schola Cantorum, playing the flute with Symphonic Winds, arguing with the Debate Society or writing articles for the psychology newsletter, Analyze This. Check in with me at PC Smartypants for tips and tricks for college success!

I’d like to offer a huge “Congratulations!” to all the first years. Way to go—you survived your first semester of college! You survived your first semester of DWC! You came, saw, and conquered, and now you’re ready for another semester at PC.

Now what?

The jump from fall semester to spring semester can be especially rough for first years. Many of you have transitioned from taking four classes to taking five. While it may not seem like a huge difference, the extra three hours of class and consequent extra six hours of homework (as per Undergraduate Catalog recommendations) quickly eat into the free time you enjoyed last semester—or worse, the time you used doing homework for those other four classes. Many of you may also have transitioned out of introductory classes into higher level work. It can very easy to coast by in some first semester classes if you have a background in AP classes—the material is a review, so the homework moves faster and there is less investment in studying before exams. But when you are suddenly confronted with new material in a college setting, it can be overwhelming.

This is the point in your life where, if it hasn’t already, time management becomes really important. With more of your time beholden to a schedule and more things you need to do in your unscheduled time, it becomes harder to send your homework into the impenetrable ether of “later.” I don’t mean to say you need to have every second of every day accounted for, but for those of you who are not accustomed to planning ahead, there’s no time like the present to start. Get a calendar. Get a planner. Write a To-Do list. Having even a general sense of what you need to have accomplished and when puts you in a better position to tackle the extra work—or the new work—you have taken on.

Finally, include something “for you” every day. I know that I’m tempted to stay locked in my apartment all day if I have a lot of work to do, but it’s just as important to have some fun too. Balance is key—use this spring to figure out what balance works for you.

GUEST BLOGGER: CHRISTINA PERRI Hello Friartown! My name is Christina Perri, and I am a junior from Long Island, New York. I am a biology and psychology double major with a minor in neuroscience, and a member of the Liberal Arts Honors Program. I work in the OAS Tutoring Center primarily as a CIV tutor, […]MORE

5 Things to Stop Stress Now

Posted by: on September 19, 2014   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

christina-perri-blogGUEST BLOGGER: CHRISTINA PERRI
Hello Friartown! My name is Christina Perri, and I am a junior from Long Island, New York. I am a biology and psychology double major with a minor in neuroscience, and a member of the Liberal Arts Honors Program. I work in the OAS Tutoring Center primarily as a CIV tutor, and I dabble in other subjects as needed. When I’m not in class, lab, or OAS, I can be found singing with Schola Cantorum, playing the flute with Symphonic Winds, arguing with the Debate Society or writing articles for the psychology newsletter, Analyze This. Check in with me at PC Smartypants for tips and tricks for college success!

College students revel in early September. Classes are just starting, material is often a review or simple enough that it does not take much effort to keep up, and there is plenty of time to ease back into the grind of schoolwork before that first round of exams and papers. But the habits you establish during the early weeks of September can make or break your semester stress levels. Here are some ways to start off strong so you don’t end up stressed come mid-October.

1)      Get a calendar.

A big calendar hangs on the wall of my apartment kitchen. My roommates and I have recorded everything from hockey games to Lessons and Carols to whose week it is to clean the common room on it. In my personal calendar, I have the dates and times of all my quizzes, exams, papers and homework assignments laid out. Midterm week becomes a lot less stressful when you can anticipate your work load – both in and out of class – and plan ahead for it.

2)      Stay on top of work now.

It’s tempting to slack off early in the semester because there isn’t a lot of work, and there seems to be a lot of time to catch up later. Unfortunately, workloads tend to snowball and before long you can find yourself drowning not only in the big assignments that are looming, but also in the work you put off earlier. Form a firm foundation of basic knowledge, whether it is in chemistry, economics or DWC, now so you will be better prepared for what’s to come.

3)      Learn when you learn best.

The flexibility of college scheduling is both a blessing and a curse. Many of us have come from a high school setting where we were in classes for six hours a day, five days a week. Consistency was key, and consistency is often lacking in college schedules. Every day of the week is a unique combination of lectures, labs and seminars, and that can make finding a study time challenging. Use these first few weeks to figure out when works best for you – studying in the morning before classes, mid-afternoon, or in the evening after classes are finished.

4)      Quantify your work, not your time.

“I’m going to do an hour of CIV reading a night” is something that freshmen may be proud of themselves for deciding. The problem students with that mindset will often run into, however, is that they will dawdle for an hour “doing work” (and checking Facebook, and scrolling through Buzzfeed, and texting, and…) and, when that time is up, they will immediately stop and go off to do something fun, despite making no progress in that CIV reading. Instead of planning around time, plan around quantity. Read a chapter a night. Do ten math problems a night. And commit to it to ensure the work is done consistently.

5)      Make “me” time.

I’ve bombarded you so completely with ways to work, when to work, how to work, work, work, work that now your head may be spinning. Will I spend my entire college career working? Are these really the best years of my life if all I do is work? This is why my parting thought to you is that you should schedule in some “me” time. Make sure that you have time every week to decompress. Watch a movie. Paint your nails. Play some Frisbee while it’s still warm out. Put the CIV book down and pick up that tattered copy of Harry Potter. Take some time to live in the moment of what you want to do before the alarm goes off again on Monday morning.

 

 

GUEST BLOGGER: CHRISTINA PERRI Hello Friartown! My name is Christina Perri, and I am a junior from Long Island, New York. I am a biology and psychology double major with a minor in neuroscience, and a member of the Liberal Arts Honors Program. I work in the OAS Tutoring Center primarily as a CIV tutor, and […]MORE