6 Essential Ways to Stand Out in a Group Interview

6 Essential Ways to Stand Out in a Group Interview

Posted by: on February 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Peer Mentoring

Many thanks to Mark Correia ’14, ’15G, Erinn Miles ’16, and Melissa Sheil ’16 for their suggestions and personal experiences!

It is that time of the semester where there is excitement in the air and I’m not talking about our basketball team.  Students are starting the interviewing process for various clubs and positions on campus.  So whether you want to be an Orientation Leader, a Writing Tutor or an RA, please remember the following advice….

Social Media Image
This one can be tricky, but be aware of what your Twitter/Instagram says about you (even if it is blocked).  Tweeting about how wasted you got on a snow day is not a good look – for any position on-campus.  In a few years, you will graduate and look for a job so start thinking about your brand now.  If you put up goofy videos on YouTube, take them down.  That meme about Trump that you think is funny (but also somewhat racist), take it down. Tweeting about your annoying professor may be hilarious to your friends, but how does it look to an administrator looking to fill a position?

Group Interviews – With Friends or Strangers?
For group interviews, there are 5-6 other students all vying for the same spot and then there are a few current members asking questions and writing down your responses – it can be super intimidating.  Most students claim that it is better to interview with people they don’t know (as opposed to fighting over a spot with their friends) but the choice is yours.  Would you feel more or less comfortable highlighting your accomplishments (or failures) with your friends?  Also, some students claim that it’s best to sign up for the last group interview time so you can make a final impression right before decisions are made.  I don’t know how much truth there is to that, but I’ll pass that tip along.

Be Engaged
While other students are talking, be careful to listen and not mentally zone out.  Pay attention to other students responses and look happy to be interviewing for the position- it says a lot about how you work in a team and how engaged you will be in the position.  And if another student answers a question poorly, try not to make a face or roll your eyes.

Prep Work
While this may seem obvious, be sure to really prepare.  You will be asked tough questions (How do you respond to a resident that has been drinking?) so the more you think about your responses, the more calm and prepared you will be.  Write down your thoughts on your leadership style, what strengths you bring to an organization, etc.  Also, do a quick google search for Student Leadership Interview Questions to start thinking of how you would answer those questions.

Show Up
Often times, with group interviews you get to select a time.  When you sign up for that time, be sure to write it down in your planner/phone so you don’t forget it.  Missing your interview is a big no-no, but I’ve seen it happen.

Sell Yourself
Do not be afraid to showcase your achievements.  The key is to do so without sounding overconfident (this is where it is important to do the prep work).  Most of the positions you will be interviewing are positions of leadership, and so you need to show that during your interview. While it’s normal to get nervous, be sure to speak up!

What are your best strategies for a successful group interview?

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Many thanks to Mark Correia ’14, ’15G, Erinn Miles ’16, and Melissa Sheil ’16 for their suggestions and personal experiences! It is that time of the semester where there is excitement in the air and I’m not talking about our basketball team.  Students are starting the interviewing process for various clubs and positions on campus. […]MORE

Friar Family

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

ErinnMilesGUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16
Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. Passionate about education for all, equality for all, and daring greatly. Interests include good books, spending time with family and friends, travel, & breakfast, lunch and dinner. Good Samaritan. Proud younger sister and friend to amazing people. At PC, I am an Orientation Coordinator, Writing tutor, Admissions Ambassador, member of the 65th Student Congress Outreach Committee, and a Protégé mentor.

 

On Sunday, I helped facilitate the Junior Leadership Conference through the Student Congress Outreach Committee. For this event, high school juniors from all over Rhode Island were invited to campus for a day of workshops and learning more themselves as well as the college application process, and college in general. When I led a small group session about applying to colleges as well as involvement and how to have a successful college career, one student spoke up. He said that I had spoken so highly of PC and how easy my decision to attend Providence College seemed. The student asked, “What happens if you don’t get that ‘feeling’ of a perfect fit?” I was stopped in my tracks; I knew PC was the perfect fit for me because of so many reasons: the small community here is so inclusive, and I felt that before I was even a student. This community is still so inclusive, welcoming, and wonderful to me four years after I made the decision to attend here.

 

In light of the events surrounding the Friars winning the National Title this weekend and upcoming social events on and off campus, I hope to be assured of this community at PC. I’ve felt a part of the Friar Family since day one, and I would hope that this sense of community does not peter out over students’ frustrations.

 

We are all wonderful people; we each have done truly great things here and have amazing goals and prospects for our futures. Let’s remember how we all felt when we first stepped onto PC’s campus our first day as new students. Let’s remember how welcomed our Orientation Leaders made us feel, how our professors care about our future success, and how many resources are available to us on a daily basis.

 

As a valued member of our Friar Family, I plan on looking out for my friends and peers in the coming weeks, both in the classroom and outside of it; in the dorms and on the quad. I hope we can all do the same.

GUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16 Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. Passionate about education for all, equality for all, and daring greatly. Interests include good books, spending time with family and friends, travel, & breakfast, lunch and dinner. Good Samaritan. Proud younger sister and friend to amazing people. At PC, I […]MORE

Challenge Yourself to be Present

Posted by: on March 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

MelissaSheilGUEST BLOGGER:  MELISSA SHEIL, ’16
Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I am a Protege Mentor and this past summer I worked as a Resident Assistant/Mentor in the Friar Foundations Program. I serve as a Research Assistant in Providence College’s Social Perceptions and Attitudes Lab, and am most interested in studying academic achievement. I am an Admissions Ambassador, Special Olympics Volunteer and will be volunteering on my third Habitat for Humanity trip this Spring Break! When I’m not watching PC Basketball or Hockey games, you can find me playing intramurals (and still trying to win a t-shirt)!

 

A few weeks ago, I met with one of my favorite professors at PC to catch up over coffee.  As we were discussing classes and plans for after graduation, he commented that I seemed distracted, and I immediately apologized by responding that I was caught up thinking of all of the things I had to do that day.  I mentioned that I didn’t know how I would get all of the things I had to do done by the end of the day, and made a comment along the lines of “you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do.”

I expected to get the usual response about how hard work pays off in the long run, but to my surprise my professor responded by saying, “Melissa you don’t have to do anything.”

I was confused. His response challenged my whole thought process about my responsibilities at PC. Each day, I make a list in my planner of things I have to do that day: classes, club meetings, assignments, tutoring appointments, lab meetings, etc. Like every college student, I feel like there isn’t ever enough time in the day to do everything so sometimes I find myself rushing to complete an item on the list just so that I can check it off and move on to the next item. Even worse, sometimes I find myself physically doing something on the list but my mind is somewhere else thinking about another responsibility I have to fulfill. I constantly find myself telling my peers that “I have to do this…” or “I have to do that…”

After I got over my initial shock of my professors response, I inquired exactly what he meant. He referenced Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and said that we don’t have to do anything besides fulfill our physiological needs for human survival. Everything beyond these physiological needs we choose to do. We choose to get involved in extracurricular activities. We choose to study for a test so that we (hopefully) do well. We choose to go to the tutoring appointment to get some extra help.

He emphasized the importance of realizing everything that we do is a choice. The mentality of feeling like you constantly have to do something is draining, and often takes away the joy from participating in activities that can be truly fulfilling. Once we start adopting the ideology of choice, the joy is restored to the activities we are passionate about. More importantly, once we start realizing the importance of choice, we will be present in all that we do. Being actively present allows us to flourish in co-curricular, curricular and spiritual involvement.

Under human flourishing, one of the Friar Four Foundational Pillars, it states, “Students will be able to identify and mitigate those things in their lives that are barriers to their flourishing. They will stretch themselves to become their very best without becoming frenetic and/or overly stressed.” I challenge you to realize that saying you have to do something is a barrier to your flourishing. Challenge yourself to stretch and realize that you have a choice in all that you do. If you’re like me, you’ll find that changing this part of your mentality only has positive results, and you’ll find yourself more present and engaged in all that you do.

 

GUEST BLOGGER:  MELISSA SHEIL, ’16 Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I […]MORE

“Float With the Tide, or Swim For a Goal”

Posted by: on March 16, 2015   |Comments (0)|Writing Center

ErinnMilesGUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16
Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. I enjoy watching the Friars play with heart and soul, long walks to the fridge, and equality and education for all. Trying to elevate small talk into talking about big ideas, one conversation at a time. At PC, I am an Orientation Coordinator, Writing Tutor, Admissions Ambassador, member of the 65th Student Congress, and a Protégé mentor.

 

 

 

Hunter S. Thompson has been an author and modern philosopher of sorts who has made me question what I know. Thompson authored the book about Hell’s Angels in the 1960s, for which he lived and rode with this biker gang for over a year. Thompson also was a counter cultural figure, questioning posh events such as the Kentucky Derby, as well as President Nixon’s career and morals before he assumed the presidency (what a prediction!). Through questioning the status quo and being an honest and eloquent writer, Thompson became an internationally famous author and journalist. When he was 20, he penned this quote in a letter to a friend:

“Whether to float with the tide, or to swim for a goal. It is a choice we must all make consciously or unconsciously at one time in our lives.”

I think this quote is important to all of us as students at this time in our lives. Sure, it was probably assumed that we would attend some college, get a degree, find a good job post-grad, continue working, maybe get married, maybe have kids, possibly retire at 65, and then die. This boring plateau never has spikes or dips; it’s just that—boring. Unbeknownst to me, because of Providence College and the opportunities I have been afforded, I have found my way off this boring one-way street toward my tombstone.

It was not really until Christmas at my grandmother’s house this past December that I realized this. When two of my eleven aunts and uncles (I’m an Irish Catholic…) began to ask me what I wanted to do after graduation, I blurted out that I wanted to work in Student Development in Higher Education. Excuse me? I hadn’t put that sentence together ever before, and here I was giving myself a new work title for 18 months down the road. Because of PC and the decision I made to come here, I now know that I am capable and able to do almost anything I want to because of these opportunities granted to me.

Daily, we face hundreds of minute decisions: what to wear for the day, which path to take to class, if you’ll have a long or a short conversation with Dot. However, we also face a few influential decisions to make every day that we probably don’t even realize. How we speak to one another, if we stop to reflect on our day, if we take the time to truly communicate and engage with our fellow friars. These small decisions establish if we’re floating with the tide and following the status quo, or if we decide to swim for a goal and truly be vulnerable and authentic citizens.

Because of this quote and Thompson’s important work, I attempt to swim for a goal daily, to swim against the current and not always do the popular thing.

Will you?

GUEST BLOGGER: ERINN MILES, ’16 Junior Sociology & Women’s Studies double major from Sartell, Minnesota. I enjoy watching the Friars play with heart and soul, long walks to the fridge, and equality and education for all. Trying to elevate small talk into talking about big ideas, one conversation at a time. At PC, I am […]MORE

14 Reasons Why We Love PC

Posted by: on February 16, 2015   |Comments (0)|Tutoring Center

MelissaSheilHi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I am a Protege Mentor and this past summer I worked as a Resident Assistant/Mentor in the Friar Foundations Program. I serve as a Research Assistant in Providence College’s Social Perceptions and Attitudes Lab, and am most interested in studying academic achievement. I am an Admissions Ambassador, Special Olympics Volunteer and will be volunteering on my third Habitat for Humanity trip this Spring Break! When I’m not watching PC Basketball or Hockey games, you can find me playing intramurals (and still trying to win a t-shirt)!

 

Providence College is my home away from home. It has been since I stepped foot on campus for the first time, and it will continue to be a part of me long after I graduate. When I think of PC, the first thing that comes to mind isn’t Development of Western Civilization, or even the fact that we are Big East Champions. The first thing that comes to mind is that Providence College is a place that has supported me, transformed me, and allowed me to grow over the past three years.

 

Providence College does these things for everyone who is lucky enough to be a student on its campus. While the busyness of our day to day activities doesn’t always allow us to reflect on this transformation, we each experience special moments on campus that allow us to truly see how much we have grown in our time at PC. For me, these moments of reflection happen whenever I take a walk around campus.

 

As I was walking towards Slavin last night, the sun was setting and seemed to be highlighting the “I Love PC” sign on the glass walls. This past week, the Alumni & Family Weekend theme has been displayed everywhere. I took this as an opportunity to ask my peers to reflect on why they love PC. This is what I found:

 

1.  Clubs and Organizations: “I love the clubs and organizations. Through them I’ve met some really smart, dedicated, and passionate people and friends. They also allow for individual growth and expansion of ideas.”

         –Aida Cruz, 2015

2.  Friar Family: “I love being able to walk around and talk to everyone. It’s a great feeling knowing everyone on this campus has each other’s backs.”

     Eric Rivera, 2016

3.  Intramural Sports: “One thing I love about PC is that I have had the opportunity to play in a ton of different intramural sports. My favorite intramurals are flag football and wiffleball because it is always fun to stay active and hang out with my friends. Still waiting on that T-shirt though!”

       – Kathryn Ellersick, 2016

4.  Guzman Hall: “Guzman Hall is home to about 120 freshman boys and is the best dorm on campus! The bond created from living in Guzman Hall is invaluable. The fact that everyone who lives here cares for each other makes it the best place to live. Walking up and down the halls feeling welcome in every room you see is something really special. I couldn’t imagine not having the brothers I met in my dorm, and we will forever be a part of Guzman Hall.”

                   –Brian Sheil, 2018

5.  Opportunity for Growth: “I love PC because it is a nurturing place that allows you to grow and evolve. It has really helped me to find my calling and what I truly love in life, which is helping other students. As the saying goes, you are always a FRIAR. Knowing you can always fall back on the PC community is a bonus!”

            Marco Aurelien, 2016

6.  Everyone finds their place:I love PC because there are so many things to get involved in. Everyone has a place here.”

            – Chris Reynolds, 2018

7.  Values: “I love PC because it reflects my morals and Catholic values, and for the invaluable education that offers an array of courses.”

        –Arlin Baez, 2017

8.  Service: “Service is one of the biggest reasons I love Providence College. I am a social work major and have done two semesters of service as an element of my classes. I have also participated on Habitat for Humanity Spring Break trips for three years. Both of these opportunities have given me the ability to help those in need and grow as a student at PC and a future helping professional, which I am forever grateful for.”

         – Lindsey DePippo, 2016

9.  Friendships: “I love PC because of the friendships I’ve made and the sense of community. I’ve met some of my closest friends in my four years here, and I consider them an extension of my family.”

       Mike Giso, 2015

10.  PC’s Amazing Staff:The workers all over campus, especially those at Ray, go out of their way to brighten your day. Fran and Dot are like my grandmothers always checking up on me and giving me a compliment.”

  – Will Cavedon, 2016

11.  Campus Scenery: “My favorite thing about PC is our beautiful campus. I love being able to enjoy the scenery throughout all of the seasons as I walk to class. I especially love the trees!”

  – Ali Chapman, 2016

12.  Community: “One reason I love PC is the community. I have never been in a place that the people cared about each other so much. The students here make sure everyone is being the best they can be.”

             – Kevin Hoegler, 2017

13.  Everyone’s Love for PC:My favorite part of Providence College is that everyone at PC loves PC. When I was applying, there was not one person who did not rave about how amazing their experience was and never had anything but good things to say. This creates an irresistible energy on campus because you know that everyone is just as excited to be a part of the Friar Family as you are!”

        –Abby Wolf, 2018

 These reasons, and more, are why Alumni continue to maintain such a strong relationship with the Providence College community. PC has a lasting impact on each of its students, and fosters love within the Friar Family that endures long after a student graduates. Which brings me to the fourteenth reason why we love PC:

14.  Forever a Friar.

Personally, I view this saying as embodying what our school is all about. PC is differentiated from other colleges based on its identity as family. Take this weekend as an opportunity to reach out to your extended Friar Family- find out what they love about PC, and why they keep coming back.

Hi Friars! My name is Melissa Sheil and I am from Southwick, Massachusetts. I am a junior psychology major with a business studies certificate, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. I tutor DWC, philosophy and theology in OAS, and am also a member of Tutor Cabinet. I am a Protege Mentor and […]MORE