Behind the scenes with David McCullough ’18Hon.

Historian and author David McCullough '18Hon. at the One Hundredth Commencement Exercises of Providence College.
Historian and author David McCullough ’18Hon. at the One Hundredth Commencement Exercises of Providence College.

By Vicki-Ann Downing

Alexander Hamilton has an award-winning Broadway musical, but historian David McCullough ’18Hon. remains loyal to Hamilton’s rival, John Adams.

The conflict between the two Founding Fathers was documented in John Adams, the book by McCullough that won the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 2002, was adapted into a TV miniseries, and like the rest of McCullough’s books, has never been out of print.

McCullough was asked about the rivalry, and about Hamilton the musical, during an interview prior to the One Hundredth Commencement Exercises of Providence College on Sunday, May 20, during which he received an honorary doctor of letters degree and presented the keynote address.

“Anybody who isn’t a friend of my friend John Adams has an uphill climb,” McCullough said.

Of the musical, he said, “If it gets (people) into the tent, I’m all for it, inaccurate as it may be. It’s not history, it’s a show. That’s different.”

One year ago, McCullough helped dedicate the new Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. Talented students from the Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts joined an original Hamilton cast member, Sydney James Harcourt, in performing songs from the musical.

“They were fabulous,” said McCullough. “I could see right away why the show was successful.”

But he hasn’t seen it yet, joking that he is descended from a “number of Scots, and we don’t like to pay that much money,” and adding that the show is taking place in New York, far from his home in Hingham, Mass.

In fact, McCullough is busy on his next book, The Pioneers, the story of New Englanders who went to Ohio to establish the first town in the Northwest Territory. They were veterans of the Revolutionary War who’d been paid in worthless money and were offered land as compensation. They overcame challenges to establish a territory with public schools, constitutional government, and — rare for that time — no slavery.

All the records are kept in Marietta, Ohio, McCullough said. There are five main characters in the story, “each very different and playing a different role.”

“I like taking people you’ve never heard of and giving them long overdue credit,” McCullough said.

He begins writing his books before his research is complete.

“Enough to get started,” he said. “It helps me figure out what additional information I need. And, I need to know how much I don’t know yet.

“I don’t like to know how the story is going to turn out,” he said. “I want to be in the same shoes as the reader.”

The challenge in writing history is “to get inside the character,” McCullough said. “It’s people that matter. History is about people.”

“Though you can’t cheat,” he added. “You can’t make anything up.”

When he has time, McCullough reads fiction, not history. He loves Anthony Trollope and mystery writers such as P.D. James and Ruth Rendell.

A gifted speaker and the holder of 55 honorary degrees, McCullough writes a new address for every event he attends.

“I feel very strongly that if they’re honoring me that way, I must do something that’s done just for them,” he said.

McCullough’s first appearance at PC came in 2013, when he spoke at the dedication of the Ruane Center for the Humanities. He will celebrate his 85th birthday in July. His wife of 63 years, Rosalee Barnes McCullough, whom he described as his editor-in-chief, accompanied him at commencement.

Transcript of McCullough’s speech
Sam Rachleff of Houston, Texas, talks with David McCullough '18Hon. during the president's reception at the Ruane Center for the Humanities. He is the son of honorary degree recipient Larry Rachleff '18, retired music director of the Rhode Island Philharmonic and Orchestra and a professor at Rice University.
Sam Rachleff of Houston, Texas, talks with David McCullough ’18Hon. during the president’s reception at the Ruane Center for the Humanities. He is the son of honorary degree recipient Larry Rachleff ’18Hon., retired music director of the Rhode Island Philharmonic and Orchestra and a professor at Rice University. Also pictured is McCullough’s wife, Rosalee.

Legacy parents congratulate the Class of 2018

Alumni parents of the Class of 2018 recorded messages that were shared at the Legacy Dinner during Commencement Weekend 2018.

Thank you videos from the Class of 2018

Some members of the Class of 2018 recorded greetings that were aired before Commencement Exercises began.

Historian McCullough tells graduates: America is lucky, resilient

A jubilant graduate shares her feelings after receiving her diploma at the One Hundredth Commencement Exercises.
A jubilant graduate shares her feelings after receiving her diploma at the One Hundredth Commencement Exercises.

By Vicki-Ann Downing

The One Hundredth graduating class in the history of Providence College heard acclaimed historian and author David McCullough discuss the role luck has played in history, and received his wish for luck in their own lives, during Commencement Exercises at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center in downtown Providence on Sunday, May 20, 2018.

“How lucky we all are to live in this great country, where freedom of speech, rule of law, and representative government remain the way of life; where love of learning holds strong; where there are public libraries that are free to the people,” McCullough said.

“The lessons of history are beyond counting,” McCullough said. “One is that nothing of consequence is ever accomplished alone. It’s a joint effort. Nor is there ever, or was there ever, a foreseeable future, or a self-made man or woman. We are all the result of many who have come along the way, who have taught us and encouraged us, seen to our needs, who are there for us in times of need.

“We have serious problems to face as a people, make no mistake, and one of them is our public school system, but we will solve that problem and others. That’s been our way. That’s our history.”

Commencement speaker David McCullough tells graduates America always faces its serious problems and acts to solve them.
Commencement speaker David McCullough tells graduates America always faces its serious problems and acts to solve them.

McCullough is the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes and two National Book Awards, and has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. He has been an editor, teacher, lecturer, and voice on public television and on documentaries. In 2013, he was the keynote speaker at the dedication of PC’s Ruane Center for the Humanities.

The College presented 1,169 diplomas during the Commencement Exercises, including 905 bachelor’s degrees to full-time undergraduates; 226 master’s degrees to graduate students in education, history, theology, mathematics, and business administration; 32 degrees to students in the School of Continuing Education; and six honorary degrees.

In addition to McCullough, honorary degree recipients were Joseph P. Brum ’68, consultant and retired special assistant to the president for development projects at PC; Brian M. Maher ’68, retired director of the Long Island Educational Opportunity Center at Farmingdale State College; U.S. Army Col. (Ret.) Lisa M. (Thibault) Schenck ’83,  associate dean for academic affairs at The George Washington University Law School; Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, president emerita of Spelman College and author of the landmark book, ‘Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria’ and Other Conversations About Race; and Larry Rachleff, retired music director for the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and a professor at Rice University.

In his commencement address, McCullough told graduates the desire for luck is part of human nature, and it’s part of history, too, because history is human. A course examining the role of luck in history would be a fascinating one, he said. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was known to carry a rabbit’s foot during the 1932 election campaign. Winston Churchill, when asked about courage, once said that the nation had the lion’s heart, and he had the luck to give the roar.

One of the 1,169 graduates proudly shows proof of his efforts.
One of the 1,169 graduates proudly shows proof of his efforts.

McCullough described the role luck played in allowing 9,000 troops from the American army to evacuate Brooklyn after the first great battle of the Revolutionary War, in the final days of August 1776 – also the subject of his book, 1776. Outsmarted and outfought by the British, George Washington’s army was trapped, but a miraculous shift in the wind allowed a small armada of boats to transport the army to safety all night long, and at daybreak, dense fog settled in to conceal the escape.

Wilbur Wright, who with his brother, Orville, became the first to build and fly an airplane — the subject of McCullough’s book, The Wright Brothers —was destined for college until he was injured during a pickup hockey game, said McCullough. Instead, at home in a house full of books provided by his father, “an itinerant preacher who believed in a liberal arts education at home,” Wilbur Wright read about a glider enthusiast and studied birds, which led him to “begin thinking in ways he never had.

“The worst thing that had ever happened to him was transformed by him into the best thing — it gave him a mission,” said McCullough. “With his brother, he changed the world.”

McCullough said the greatest stroke of his own life was “the arrival on the scene of a princess from afar,” his wife of 63 years, Rosalee. The couple has five children and 19 grandchildren.

“I close now with a few thoughts for you,” said McCullough. “Be generous. Count kindness as all-important in life. Take an interest in those around you. Try to keep in mind that everyone you encounter along the way, no matter their background or station in life, knows something you don’t. Ask people about themselves and listen to them. It’s amazing what you can learn by listening. Speaking the truth, loyalty, decency, courage, and character matter still, indeed count now more than ever.

“You will face serious bumps in the road. Don’t be discouraged. Don’t give up,” McCullough said. “We’ve known worse times and come through, and we will now, if we never forget who we are and what we stand for. The world needs you, Class of 2018.

“There’s work to be done. Never lapse into being spectators only. If you’re going to ring the bell, give that rope a hell of a pull. Wherever you go, remember to tip the maid. And best of luck to each and every one of you.”

As for the class McCullough was addressing, 37 percent of the undergraduates graduated with honors, including 75 who graduated summa cum laude, 133 who graduated magna cum laude, and 129 who graduated cum laude. Also, 322 students were named to honor societies.

There were 93 undergraduate legacy students in the class — those with least one parent who attended PC — and 21 who shared a legacy with both parents.

Olivia Lo is all smiles as she processes into the arena with classmates.
Olivia Lo is all smiles as she processes into the arena with classmates.

At the graduate education level, a milestone was achieved by the College’s Providence Alliance for Catholic Teachers program, which celebrated the 300th graduate in its 17-year history. PACT students teach in Catholic schools in New England while working towards a master of education degree and teacher certification or, if they are education graduates who already have certification, they pursue a master’s degree in administration or literacy.

In his remarks to graduates at the beginning of the ceremony, College President Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P. ’80 discussed Leonardo Da Vinci, the biography by Walter Isaacson that he now is reading. Father Shanley said Da Vinci was someone who developed his thoughts not just by reading and studying, but through conversations with friends and colleagues — just as students in the Class of 2018 had done.

Ideas are often discovered serendipitously, although at PC, “we would say providentially, by the hand of God,” Father Shanley said.

Among other speakers who brought greetings, Karen Monti Flynn ’80 & ’15P, president of the National Alumni Association, welcomed all graduates to the alumni family.

“Over 56,000 graduates have passed this way before you, and today their collective talents have contributed greatly to every career field imaginable in every state across this country and globally — not to mention their time, talent, and treasure, which has enabled Providence College and you to be all you can be,” said Flynn, who noted that her son, Christian Monti Flynn ’15, would be receiving an MBA degree from the College during the ceremonies.


Conor Glendon ’18 (Valhalla, N.Y.), president of the senior class and an economics major, reflected nostalgically upon his four years at PC.

“We have completed our education here, and in so doing we have strengthened our minds as we’ve learned to think for ourselves and to search for truth in our everyday lives,” Glendon said. “We have strengthened our hearts; we have created an indelible community here at PC, and although our time ends, the family that we have created will extend long past graduation.”

Several government officials offered congratulations, including U.S. Rep. James R. Langevin, D-R.I., Rhode Island General Treasurer Seth Magaziner, and Providence Mayor Jorge O. Elorza.

The invocation was given by Most Rev. Robert C. Evans, D.D., auxiliary bishop of Providence. The benediction and presentation of graduates was by Rev. Peter Martyr Yungwirth, O.P., College chaplain.

Tiernan Chase ’18 (Newport, R.I.) led the singing of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” which was performed by Providence College Symphonic Winds, led by Dr. Eric Melley, director of instrumental activities. Thomas Begley ’18 (Saint Albans, Vt.) led the singing of the Alma Mater.

Very Rev. Kenneth R. Letoile, O.P. ’70, chairman of the Providence College Corporation and prior provincial of the Dominican Province of St. Joseph, assisted in conferring the honorary degrees.

Student-athlete gives class oration

College President Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P. ’80 congratulates a special award recipient at the Academic Awards Ceremony.
College President Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P. ’80 congratulates Ron De La Rosa ’18, the recipient of the Reverend Raymond St. George, O.P. Award, at the Academic Awards Ceremony.

Members of the Class of 2018 were in the spotlight at other Commencement Weekend events, including the Academy Awards Ceremony and the Commencement Mass on Saturday.

At the Academic Awards Ceremony in Peterson Recreation Center, Kristin Hayman ’18 (Redmond, Wash.), the student with the top academic rank, presented the class oration. Hayman was a biology major and a member of the women’s soccer team. She will pursue the opportunity to play professionally in Europe.

Eric Sung, associate professor of photography, presented greetings from the faculty. Sung is the recipient of the 2017-18 Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award, presented to the faculty member who best exhibits excellence in teaching, passion and enthusiasm for learning, and genuine concern for students’ academic and personal growth.

The Commencement Mass and Service of Investiture was celebrated on Saturday afternoon in Peterson Recreation Center with Father Shanley as the principal celebrant and homilist. Fifteen student leaders in academics, organizations, and athletics were invested at the Mass, including Hayman, the top-ranked student, and Glendon, the class president.

Also honored were Phionna-Cayola Claude ’18 (Dedham, Mass.), Alexander Cromwell ’18 (McKinney, Texas), Jarely Paulino Díaz ’18 (Lawrence, Mass.), Brianna Frias ’18 (Worcester, Mass.), Marla Gagne ’18 (West Haven, Conn.), Elizabeth Jancsy ’18 (Marblehead, Mass.), Sarah Kelley ’18 (Swampscott, Mass.), Carolina Lima ’18 (Shrewsbury, Mass.), Simran Madhani ’18 (Southlake, Texas), Marcie Mai ’18 (Methuen, Mass.), Dylan McLoone ’18 (Irvington, N.Y.), Thomas Nee ’18 (Winthrop, Mass.), and Sean Quinn ’18 (North Falmouth, Mass.).

Music at the Mass was provided by the combined liturgical choirs, director by Mark Colozzi, director of liturgical music, and Gabrielle Manion ’18 (Bardstown, Ky.), student conductor; I Cantori and Oriana Women’s Choir, directed by Dr. Todd J. Harper, associate professor of music and director of choral activities; and Concert Chorale, directed by Rev. Vincent Ferrer Bagan, O.P., visiting professor of choral activities.

Cantors were Begley and Anne Rodriguez ’18 (Springfield, Mass.). Readings and the general intercessions were by Nee, Bridgette Clark ’18 (Gaithersburg, Md.), and Laura Makin ’18 (East Greenwich, R.I.). Altar servers were Alexandra Luongo ’18 (Rehoboth, Mass.), Nathaniel Thomas ’18 (Sudbury, Mass.), and Daniel Arteaga ’19 (Pawtucket, R.I.).

Six students commissioned through ROTC

Thirteen students, six from PC, were commissioned as second lieutenants during the Army ROTC Patriot Battalion Commissioning Ceremony on Friday afternoon at the War Memorial Grotto outside St. Dominic Chapel. The guest speaker was Brig. Gen. Bennett E. Singer, land component commander in the Joint Forces Headquarters of the Rhode Island National Guard.

Brig. Gen. Bennett E. Singer of the Rhode Island National Guard administers the oath of office to cadets in the Class of 2018 at the ROTC Commissioning ceremony.
Brig. Gen. Bennett E. Singer of the Rhode Island National Guard administers the oath of office to cadets in the Class of 2018 at the ROTC Commissioning ceremony.

Benjamin Bauchiero ’18 (Suffield, Conn.) and Robert Harris Petry ’18 (West Hartford, Conn.) were recognized as Distinguished Military Graduates. They displayed outstanding qualities of leadership, high moral character, noteworthy academic achievement, superior camp performance, and exceptional aptitude for military service.

Bauchiero majored in business economics with a minor in Spanish. Petry was an accountancy major. Both will attend military officer training at Fort Benning, Ga., and will be assigned for active duty in the infantry.

Also commissioned were:

• Jordan Bernard ’18 (West Hartford, Conn.), a psychology major who earned a neuroscience certificate. Bernard will attend medical service officer training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, followed by service with the Connecticut National Guard.

• Spencer D’Aulisa ’18 (Merrick, N.Y.), a psychology major who minored in Italian. D’Aulisa will attend engineer officer training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and will be assigned for active duty.

• Kyle Kilner ’18 (Highland Falls, N.Y.), a management major. Kilner will attend field artillery officer training at Fort Sill, Okla., followed by duty as a New York Army National Guard officer.

• Bryan Potenziani ’18 (Madison, Conn.), a history major. Potenziani will attend infantry officer training at Fort Benning, Ga., followed by duty as a Rhode Island Army National Guard officer.

Three academic tutors turn their scholar focus to medicine and law

By Vicki-Ann Downing

Three students in the Class of 2018 finished their four years at Providence College with near-perfect grade-point averages of 3.99 on a scale of 4.0 — the equivalent of all A’s and one A minus.

The students have something else in common, too — all worked as tutors in the Office of Academic Services.

Sarah Kelley ’18 (Swampscott, Mass.), a double major in health policy and management and Spanish; Mira Magner ’18 (Shrewsbury, Mass.), a biology major and mathematics minor; and Junho Song ’18 (Babylon, N.Y.), a biology major, all members of the Liberal Arts Honors Program, will graduate summa cum laude.

Sarah Kelley '18 will work as a legal assistant while applying to law school.
Sarah Kelley ’18 will work as a legal assistant while applying to law school.

After graduation, Kelley will work as a legal assistant with Bergstresser & Pollock, PC in Boston before applying to law school. She would like to study law in a dual program that would allow her to earn a master’s degree in public policy or public health.

“Looking at how volatile the health care field is, all the changes that are happening, and how it’s affecting so many people, I knew that health policy and management was a great field of study for me,” Kelley said. “The tie between health law and the major is a natural one.”

Kelley was opinion editor of The Cowl, the student newspaper, and worked as a tutor in the Writing Center of the Office Academic Services. She also studied for a semester in Seville, Spain, through the honors program. All her courses were in Spanish, and she lived with a host family.

Running was her outlet from academic work. Kelley qualified to run the Boston Marathon in April 2017 and finished with a time of 3:43. She competes each year in Rhode Race Rhode Island, completed a half marathon this spring, and will train to run another marathon in the fall.

“It’s pretty much my outlet from school and work and extracurriculars,” Kelley said.

Kelley attained the top academic rank in both her majors. She was inducted into Phi Sigma Iota, the international foreign language honor society, and Sigma Delta Pi, the national collegiate Hispanic honor society.

Dr. Robert B. Hackey, professor of health policy and management, called Kelley “a remarkable student with a bright future.”

“Sarah brings a keen intellect and a thoughtful approach to her studies,” Hackey said. “I had the pleasure of teaching Sarah in three different upper-level classes in our program, and in each course, she emerged as a ‘go-to’ person in class discussions. She not only knows the details but has a gift of placing them into perspective.

“She has a bright future in law school, for she’s committed to tackling complex issues from more than one point of view. Sarah’s willingness to not only learn the material, but to also challenge the authors we read, truly embodies the College’s longstanding pedagogy of disputed questions.”

Mira Magner '18 is a double major in health policy and management and Spanish.
Mira Magner ’18 majored in biology with a minor in mathematics.

Magner, who is interested in becoming an oncologist, will attend Boston University School of Medicine in the fall. She tutored students in biology and chemistry in the Tutoring Center of the Office of Academic Services and also worked in the research lab of Dr. Marla B. Tipping, associate professor of biology.

“Mira joined my research team as a freshman,” said Tipping. “I quickly noticed her attention to detail when conducting complex experiments, and her genuine curiosity for science. She has a brilliant mind for learning new skills and applying them methodically. She shows up late in the evening and on weekends to move her project along. Her understanding of the science behind the techniques was evident when I observed her teaching fellow lab mates how to perform them. She became a leader in the lab who others looked to for help with data and interpretation and experimental execution.”

Magner was a member of the Board of Multicultural Student Affairs and chair of its Diversity Committee, and she served as treasurer of the Art Club, an organization with members from a variety of academic disciplines.

“Attending Providence College has been one of the best decisions I have made,” Magner said. “In my four years at PC, I’ve been involved in opportunities that have allowed me to meet many amazing people and helped me to grow and succeed. The community is incredible. I’ve made lifelong connections with my faculty and my classmates that I know would not have been possible anywhere else, and I truly feel like I will always be a part of the Friar Family.”

Magner is a member of Alpha Epsilon Delta, the national health pre-professional honor society, and Sigma Xi, the scientific research honor society. At the Academic Awards Ceremony, she will receive the Richard G. Mignacca, M.D. ’60 Award, presented to an outstanding senior who will attend medical school.

Magner and Song both will receive the Stephen J. Ryan, M.D. ’30 Distinguished Student Award, presented to a senior who will study medicine and who possesses “the characteristics of integrity, compassion, and personality that would make the ideal physician.”

Junho Song '18, a biology major, presented his research at PC's annual Celebration of Scholarship and Creativity.
Junho Song ’18, a biology major, presented his research at PC’s annual Celebration of Scholarship and Creativity.

Song, who is interested in orthopedic surgery and anesthesiology, will attend the Donald & Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in Hempstead, N.Y. He was a biology and chemistry tutor in the Tutoring Center of the Office of Academic Services and worked in the research lab of Dr. Seann P. Mulcahy, associate professor of chemistry.

“Junho has been a model student in the classroom and laboratory, earning high grades in challenging courses and contributing to a research project that will soon be submitted for publication,” Mulcahy said. “He has also used his knowledge to help other students reach their own goals. He has been one of the ‘go-to’ tutors in OAS for several years running. The respect he has earned from his classmates bodes well for communicating with future patients as he embarks on a medical degree from Hofstra University.”

During the summer of 2017, Song was awarded a Veritas Distinguished Internship and received a stipend to take part in the Harvard Orthopedic Trauma Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

He was founder and president of PC’s chapter of the American Medical Student Association. He is a member and president of Alpha Epsilon Delta, the national health pre-professional honor society, and Sigma Xi, the scientific research honor society.

“I chose PC for its extraordinary community cohesiveness,” said Song. “That’s what really drew me in and made PC stand out to me, aside from the academic possibilities. I feel like I really made family members and lifelong friends here. The professors aren’t just professors but mentors who I will stay in touch with for the rest of my life. I didn’t just learn science from them. I learned life skills, management skills, and professional skills.”

A monumental degree of success for first Friar Foundations Program graduates

Members of the founding class of the Friar Foundations Program, their student mentors, and other supporters in the College community take a field trip to Providence’s Roger Williams Park Zoo in July 2014 as part of program activities.
Members of the founding class of the Friar Foundations Program, their student mentors, and other supporters in the College community take a field trip to Providence’s Roger Williams Park Zoo in July 2014 as part of program activities.

By Charles C. Joyce

Of the more than 1,100 students who will take part in Providence College’s One Hundredth Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 20, none may be more proud than a group of 20 who spent five weeks together on campus the summer before their college adventure began.

Pioneers in an unpredictable journey, these 20 students quickly leaned on each other and their student mentors, persevered, learned to believe in themselves, and, over time, blossomed. Four years later, they will be the first graduates of the Friar Foundations Program — diplomas in hand and futures filled with hope.

Kaitlyn M. O’Malley, program director
Kaitlyn M. O’Malley, program director

“For some of them, to graduate from PC was not a foregone conclusion. It was a pie-in-the-sky idea, and here they’ve done it. In a lot of cases, it’s incredible,” said Kaitlyn M. O’Malley, associate director for student-athlete success in the Office of Academic Services and the director of the Friar Foundations Program.

In keeping with the College’s mission, the program was founded to ease the transition from high school to college for approximately 25 accepted students who might benefit from a jumpstart to their college career. The summer bridge program addresses several of the issues students face when transitioning, including academic responsibility and social assimilation.

Students, many of whom are the first in their family to attend college, live on campus for five weeks in July and August before the start of the formal academic year later in August. They take credit-bearing courses totaling six credits, attend skills-building workshops, participate in field trips and service opportunities, and get to know fellow students and the campus.

Including members of the Class of 2018, 86 of the 96 students who have enrolled in the program in its first four years continue to study at PC. More than 100 program graduates, current and former mentors, administrators, staff, faculty, and friends recently gathered at a reception to celebrate the accomplishments of the first class and the program overall.

Seizing the opportunity

The first graduates-to-be of the program say it not only was a foundational anchor, but it helped them develop in multiple ways — with many finding their academic passion and becoming mentors and leaders in student clubs and organizations.

Program participant Heriberto Castro ’18 speaks about Friar Foundations at a scholarship dinner in New York this spring.
Program participant Heriberto Castro ’18 speaks about Friar Foundations at a scholarship dinner in New York this spring.

“Friar Foundations helps make a great education possible for young people who would otherwise not be able to have this opportunity,” said Heriberto “Eddie” Castro ’18 (Brooklyn, N.Y.) in remarks to alumni, benefactors, and other friends of PC at a recent scholarship dinner in New York City. A quantitative economics major and an Italian language minor, Castro became a resident assistant/mentor for Friar Foundations.

“My experience with Friar Foundations was very important … it helped me with the transition to college,” said Castro. “I am very thankful for everyone who believes in this wonderful program.”

Castro said one of the first bits of advice he would give mentees was to get as much out of their Development of Western Civilization courses as they could because they “will open your world.” DWC introduced him to the great philosophers, theologians, historians, writers, and artists of the Western world, said Castro.

Another founding-year participant who is graduating this year, Jarely Paulino Díaz ’18 (Lawrence, Mass.), expressed appreciation for the many people who influenced her.

“It was through this program that I met two of my best friends and roommates,” said Paulino, who majored in public and community service studies and minored in Italian. “I also met my Friar Foundations mentor and role model, Eric Rivera (Class of 2016), who, after the first summer, continued to mentor me and helped me get into different leadership positions and even grad school. I would not be the person I am today, with the experience I have, if it wasn’t for the people, especially Eric, being in my life, whom I met through the program.”

A native of the Dominican Republic, Paulino was a resident assistant for three years. She also was a Friar Foundations mentor for two years, a Board of Multicultural Student Affairs Outreach Committee member for three years, a mentor to multicultural students and a coordinator for the Horizons program, and a member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society. She was inducted into the Gamma Kappa Alpha National Italian Honor Society this academic year.

From left, Jarely Paulino Diaz ’18, Patrick Rogers ’17, and Amie Mbye ’18 were Friar Foundations Program mentors in 2016. Paulino and Mbye were part of the program’s first class.
From left, Jarely Paulino Diaz ’18, Patrick Rogers ’17, and Amie Mbye ’18 were Friar Foundations Program mentors in 2016. Paulino and Mbye were part of the program’s first class.

Paulino, who plans to attend graduate school, said her goal after graduation is to continue working with college students or high school students who are transitioning to college. She expressed a desire to work with first-generation students.

A close friend of Paulino’s, Amie Mbye ’18 (Pawtucket, R.I.), said joining Friar Foundations in her first year was pivotal in many ways. When she returned to campus for the start of fall classes, she already had six credits and knew more than 20 members of her class.

“Being a participant of the program made it so much easier to transition into college, especially since we established connections with some administrators, faculty, and staff, who could assist us in whatever we needed while we were here at PC,” said Mbye, who double majored in global studies and economics while also taking minors in Spanish and Latin American studies.

Mbye returned the following two summers as a Friar Foundations mentor. During her PC career, she also was an orientation leader for a year, a mentor for Horizons, and served as the secretary of the Board of Multicultural Student Affairs her senior year.

A member of the Dirigo Leadership Honor Society, Mbye was inducted into the Omicron Delta Epsilon International Economics Honor Society this academic year. She will receive the Sister Thea Bowman Award at the Academic Awards Ceremony on Saturday, May 19. It is awarded annually to a graduating senior who serves PC and the community while also showing openness and respect for others regardless of race, creed, or social status.

Mbye, who was born in the United States to parents who are natives of Gambia, plans to begin work on a master’s degree in global affairs at George Mason University in Virginia this fall. She hopes one day to return to Gambia, where she lived for five years, to work in a position that empowers women in that West African nation socially and economically.

“I hope for the Friar Foundations Program to continue flourishing and making an impact in the lives of those involved in it way beyond the time we leave PC,” she said.

Read more about Friar Foundation participants Jarely Paulino Díaz ’18, Amie Mbye ’18, and Jeffrey Vasquez ’18 in this Providence College Magazine story. 

De La Rosa siblings find support, fulfillment at PC 

Ron '18 and Nicole '18 De La Rosa have immersed themselves in the life of the College community since entering PC in 2014.
Ron ’18 and Nicole ’18 De La Rosa have immersed themselves in the life of the College community since entering PC in 2014.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is one in a series of stories about students in the Class of 2018 as Providence College prepares to celebrate its One Hundredth Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 20, 2018, at 11 a.m. at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, Providence.

By Debbie Hazian

When Ron De La Rosa ’18 and his sister, Nicole De La Rosa ’18 (North Providence, R.I.), were just 10 and 8 years old, they were sent by their mother to live with their father and stepmother in the United States. As they left their home in a small, rural town in the Dominican Republic, their only certainty was a future with better educational opportunities.

As they prepare to graduate together from Providence College, with Nicole having presented a poster detailing her research at a national conference during her college career and Ron achieving summa cum laude honors, they are filled with satisfaction and appreciation.

Humble and unassuming about all they have accomplished, Ron and Nicole are deeply grateful for the PC faculty and administrators who supported them throughout their educational journey.

After graduating from North Providence High School, Ron took classes at the Community College of Rhode Island and became interested in computer science. Nicole graduated two years later and applied to colleges throughout the Northeast where she could major in biology but also have other options. Both wanted a small school with a strong reputation and faculty.

Their uncle, Paul DeMeo, M.D. ’86, and his son, Nicholas DeMeo ’17, both majored in biology at PC. Paul went to medical school at the University of Vermont, and Nicholas is studying at Harvard Dental School. They were a strong influence in encouraging the De La Rosas to attend their alma mater.

In 2014, Ron and Nicole’s parents attended a Rhode Island Latino Business Network event at the Providence College/Smith Hill Annex on Douglas Avenue, about a half-mile from campus. The event was hosted by Tomas Avila, a longtime leader in the state’s Latino community, and featured guest speaker Rafael Zapata, former PC associate vice president and chief diversity officer. Zapata explained the mission of the Office of Diversity and shared other information.

Biology major Nicole De La Rosa '18, front, worked closely during her PC career with Dr. Cara Pina, a postdoctoral research fellow in biology, rear.
Biology major Nicole De La Rosa ’18, front, worked closely during her PC career with Dr. Cara Pina, a postdoctoral research fellow in biology, rear.

Ron and Nicole’s stepmother, Donna, was inspired by the College’s desire to attract students from diverse backgrounds and to support them. Ron and Nicole decided to apply to PC, were accepted, and enrolled together.

Nicole admits she had doubts.

“I wasn’t as prepared academically as some of the other students,” she said. “There are so many support systems, and I took advantage of them. The professors are really willing to help you, and that comes from being in small classes. I always wanted professors I could go to for help and career advice.

“I really like that PC is a liberal arts school,” added the biology major. “The core requirements are so useful. You have to be able to write well and the Civ program hones those skills. Public speaking helps with communication. You need classes in ethics and philosophy to be an ethical person and a good citizen.”

Ron, a double major in French and computer science, feels he has grown and matured at PC. His professors were accessible and approachable. “Any advice they gave me, I took it to heart,” he said. “I learned to ask for help when I needed it.”

He credits Dr. Patricia Lawlor, professor of French, and Dr. Cyrielle Faivre, assistant professor of French, for their support and for serving as role models. Both faculty members consider Ron an outstanding student and hope he will attend graduate school to earn a doctorate in French.

Ron De La Rosa '18, standing, second from right, took part in the NOLA immersion service project in New Orleans over winter break with other PC students and members of the Campus Ministry staff. 
Ron De La Rosa ’18, standing, second from right, took part in the NOLA immersion service project in New Orleans over winter break with other PC students and members of the Campus Ministry staff.

Calling him “a gentleman scholar,” Lawlor said, “Ronald is a brilliant student with unlimited potential for success. He is an astute critical reader whose written work and contributions to class discussions are always original and insightful. His classmates respect and admire him, and I can only imagine that his parents must be bursting with pride. He is proficient in three languages and cultures but remains extremely modest and humble.”

Faivre praised his “beautifully written essays, extremely intelligent comments in class, and an exceptional attitude. From the very first class, Ronald demonstrated a deep understanding of the connection between a foreign language and a country’s specific culture and literature.”

Ron spent a month studying in France, was president of the French Club, and tutored students in French and Spanish. He volunteered to help build houses in New Orleans as part of the NOLA immersion outreach sponsored by Campus Ministry, drove a student group to a Habitat for Humanity site in Pennsylvania, helped out at the St. Edward’s Parish food pantry in Providence, and delivered furniture to the needy with My Brother’s Keeper. Nicole and he also volunteered at Emmanuel House in Providence, a shelter for the homeless.

Ron is the 2018 recipient of  the Rev. Raymond St. George, O.P. Award, presented by the Department of Foreign Language Studies to the highest-ranking French major, and he earned the Highest in Concentration Award in his second major, computer science.

“I wanted to make the most of my education,” he said. “I was driven by the people who came before me. They instilled in me the sense of drive, of excelling to be the best student you can be. Our parents made a lot of sacrifices for our education, and we want to repay them. We want to do well, have a great career, and give back to the community.”

Nicole excelled in her biology studies as well.

After taking a microbiology class with Dr. Brett Pellock, associate professor of biology, she began assisting with research in his lab. “I was impressed with her performance in microbiology, where she earned high marks for her efforts,” said Pellock. “She has done well in the lab, and I think it has been an important growth experience for her.”

Nicole worked with the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis to understand how bacteria respond to a variety of stress conditions. When the work is published later this year, Nicole will be a co-author on the peer-reviewed article.

“She is a very hard worker, and I am proud to say that she put in the work to learn what she needed to write a quality proposal and independently present her research at a scientific conference,” Pellock said.

Dr. Cara Pina, a postdoctoral research fellow in biology, supervised and mentored Nicole. She encouraged Nicole to apply for a travel scholarship to the SACNAS (Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science) National Diversity in STEM Annual Conference in Utah during the Fall 2017 semester.

“The conference was empowering for me,” Nicole said. “I saw for the first time people of color doing some great work and everyone being so supportive.” She was inspired to help create a SACNAS chapter at PC.

“I felt so supported here, especially by the faculty,” Nicole said. “The biology department was great in helping me develop.”

Both Zapata and Ralph Tavares ’01, assistant dean and director of multicultural student success, were very helpful to students of color, the De La Rosas said. “They always let us know about internship and research opportunities we could apply for,” Nicole said.

Dr. Keith W. Morton, professor of public and community service studies and co-coordinator of the Smith Hill Annex, says that the center helps to develop collaborations between Providence College and the Smith Hill community.

“The De La Rosas ended up at Providence College because of a chance conversation at the annex,” he said. “Bridges can and are being built between campus and community. This positive outcome is one example of what can happen as we get to know one another as neighbors.”

Nicole plans to take a gap year and work as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) before applying to graduate school to become a physician assistant (PA). Ron hopes to land a job in computer science where he can utilize his fluency in French.

“We were meant to go here,” Nicole said.  “Now we get to share the day. I’m so happy we’re graduating together.”

Jennifer Dorn ’18 wins Fulbright to teach in Czech Republic

Jennifer Dorn '18, a double major in English and theatre arts, in the seats in the Angell Blackfriars Theatre in the Smith Center for the Arts.
Jennifer Dorn ’18, a double major in English and theatre arts, sits in the Angell Blackfriars Theatre in the Smith Center for the Arts.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is one in a series of stories about students in the Class of 2018 as Providence College prepares to celebrate its One Hundredth Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 20, 2018, at 11 a.m. at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, Providence.

By Vicki-Ann Downing

The reviews are in for Jennifer Dorn ’18 — and they’re unanimously positive.

The double major in English and theatre arts has been selected to teach for a year in the Czech Republic through the  Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Program — and she’s won a national award for theatre criticism, too.

“I am excited to be able to appreciate a culture in depth,” said Dorn, who will teach English at a secondary school in Zábřeh, in the eastern part of the country, beginning in August. “The Czech Republic has a rich history in the arts. Václav Havel, the first president, was a playwright, and artists led the drive for reform in the Communist era. The arts are respected in Czech culture.”

Dorn, who lives in Dallas, Texas, is the 11th Providence College student since 2011 to receive an award from the Fulbright Program, the flagship international exchange program of the U.S. government. Each year, the program sends 1,700 scholars to more than 155 countries to study, research, or teach. Three PC alumni also have been Fulbright recipients, including one this year: Susan Malone ’13, who also will teach in the Czech Republic.

It has been an exciting final semester for Dorn. In April, during the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival in Washington, D.C., she won the Institute for Theatre Journalism and Advocacy Scholarship. She was awarded a full fellowship to attend the National Playwrights Conference at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn., from July 1-15. While there, she will work with newspaper and magazine critics from across the United States.

Dorn believes her involvement in theatre arts helped her achieve the Fulbright. The secondary school in which she will teach English has a drama club, and she will work with its students.

“I think theatre played a huge role, for anyone who might think a theatre major isn’t worthwhile,” Dorn said.

Dorn acted in seven theater performances at PC and was a crew member on three more. Her acting credits are A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Blithe Spirit, Hamlet, Into the Woods, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, The Addams Family Musical, and What Dreams May Come: A Musical Revue.

James M. Calitri, assistant professor of theatre, said the list demonstrates her range and strength in musicals, comedies, and drama.

“Jenn is unquestionably one of our best and brightest,” Calitri said. “When she was a sophomore, she made an appointment to ask me how she could become more of a leader when she was an upperclassman. Setting an example and being a role model have always been among her top priorities and strengths. Additionally, she has a Broadway-caliber singing voice.”

For her senior capstone project, Dorn directed students in Lend Me Thy Hand to Laugh a Little: An Exploration of Shakespearean Comedy, a series of scenes from Shakespearean plays. Shakespeare is her favorite — a fitting choice for someone who also majored in English and loves to write.

Dorn learned to write criticism in U.S. Fiction Since 1960, a course taught by Dr. Eric D. Bennett, associate professor of English. Instead of composing academic papers, students wrote reviews of the books they read. Dorn, who considers herself a stickler on grammar, served as a copy editor for the student newspaper, The Cowl, for four years.

Jennifer Dorn '18 performing as Cinderella in the Department of Theatre, Dance and Film production Into the Woods.
Jennifer Dorn ’18 performs as Cinderella in the Department of Theatre, Dance, and Film production of “Into the Woods.”

Each year, the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival hosts eight regional competitions in which 18,000 students from more than 600 colleges and universities compete in acting, playwriting, directing, design, and criticism. At the regional festival at Western Connecticut State University in February, Dorn wrote reviews of student productions, and her work was judged the best. From the eight regional competitions, only four students were selected to compete in Washington. Dorn was the youngest, and the only woman.

In Washington, Dorn learned from professional critics, including Sarah L. Kaufman, dance critic for The Washington Post and winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for criticism; Bob Mondello, art critic for NPR; and Chris Jones, chief theater critic for the Chicago Tribune.

Each night, she attended a professional performance, then returned to her hotel room to write a 600-word review on deadline. She reviewed Translations by Brian Friel at the Studio Theatre, Paper Dolls at the Mosaic Theater Company, and The Wiz at Ford’s Theatre. Each afternoon, she met the critics to receive feedback. On the final night of the festival, on stage at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Dorn was named the national winner for theatre criticism.

Jennifer Dorn '18 is named the winner in theatre criticism at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.
Jennifer Dorn ’18 is named the winner in theatre criticism at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

The thought of studying at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center is intimidating, she said, “because most of the people who attend are mid-career critics who have been working for a while now.”

Dorn credits her parents with teaching her and three younger brothers to appreciate the arts. She began acting at age 8 at the Jewish Community Center a few blocks from her home. When it came time for college, she wanted to study on the East Coast. She visited PC because it was founded and staffed by the Dominican Order, which also ran her high school. A scholarship and the opportunity to study in the Liberal Arts Honors Program convinced her to attend.

It was the honors program director, Dr. Stephen J. Lynch, professor of English, who suggested during her first year at PC that she might want to apply for a Fulbright before graduation. At the end of junior year, she was the first student to approach Dr. Darra Mulderry, director of national and international fellowships in the Center for Engaged Learning, for information.

Dorn spent the summer in Providence working for the Office of Admission and worked on her Fulbright application and personal statement. She has traveled internationally before, to Spain and Portugal with the honors program, and to Italy for a semester through the PC in Rome program.

She also has been selected previously for a post-graduate opportunity. After graduating, Dorn was supposed to spend two years with Teach For America in Tulsa, Okla. She was able to defer the assignment for one year, until she returns from the Czech Republic in 2019.

Jake Beaton ’18 skates off to Big Four accountancy opportunity 

Former PC hockey club goaltender Jake Beaton '18, who was given a rare opportunity to play for the Friars’ varsity team his senior year, has secured a position with EY after graduation.
Former PC hockey club goaltender Jake Beaton ’18, who was given a rare opportunity to play for the Friars’ varsity team his senior year, has secured a position with EY after graduation.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is one in a series of stories about students in the Class of 2018 as Providence College prepares to celebrate its One Hundredth Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 20, 2018, at 11 a.m. at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, Providence.

By Brendan McGair ’03

Jake Beaton ’18 had his eyes set on a senior year at Providence College where he would balance his love for hockey with his course load one more time.

The East Falmouth, Mass., native also was set to compete in national and international research challenges organized by the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute, where membership is extended to seniors and graduate students.

A finance major, Beaton was first approached about joining PC’s CFA Research Challenge team prior to spending the spring semester of his junior year studying abroad in Italy. Upon returning stateside, he spent the summer of 2017 interning at New York-based EY (Ernst & Young), the Big Four accounting firm. Working primarily in advising and consulting, Beaton secured a post-graduate position with EY by impressing supervisors and colleagues with his work and knowledge, along with his strong academic profile.

On the surface, it appeared everything was set for Beaton. Then came a hockey opportunity that represented a once-in-a-lifetime chance. After three years of playing goalie for PC’s club team, Beaton eagerly accepted a late roster spot invitation to join PC’s Hockey East program as the No. 3 goalie for the 2017-18 season.

Jake Beaton '18
Jake Beaton ’18

“I went through three years of having a normal college experience,” Beaton said. “What I went through this past season and being a part of something I love … I wouldn’t trade it for anything.”

Joining the varsity hockey ranks as a walk-on meant Beaton would have to relinquish his CFA Challenge spot. Given the magnitude of the offer from hockey Coach Nate Leaman, there were no hard feelings on the part of Matthew M. Callahan, practitioner faculty in finance and the CFA Research Challenge adviser. Having worked on Wall Street, Callahan told Beaton that his hockey version of a Cinderella story would not only serve him well during his senior year, but throughout all his post-PC endeavors.

“Here you have a top student with a chance to join one of the best hockey teams in the country,” Callahan said. “It’s a great story where one of our students gets the best of both worlds.”

Beaton heard of PC’s sudden need for a No. 3 goalie through his good friend, Friar defenseman Truman Reed ’18 (Anchorage, Alaska). A call was placed to Leaman, who arranged for a tryout that included several goalie hopefuls, one of whom was Beaton’s teammate on the club team.

One Friday morning last September, Beaton sat in Leaman’s Schneider Arena office. The coach spelled out the rigorous demands of what being a member of a Division I team meant. There would be practices Monday through Thursday, weekend games, the possibility of travel, and more, on top of carrying a full academic workload. Beaton expressed a strong desire to join the team on the spot. Leaman told Beaton to take the weekend to think about it.

After talking things over with his parents, Robert and Vicki, he felt he was truly ready to expand his hockey horizons.

“I knew it was a huge commitment. If I was going to be on the team, Coach Leaman said we need you all in,” Beaton said. “Ultimately, I realized it was something I couldn’t pass up. It was an experience of a lifetime.”

Beaton suddenly became a part of a world that had little in common with club-level hockey,  where practices are held twice per week and usually late at night. Competition-wise, the Friars’ club team generally played two games on the weekend against fellow Hockey East members and schools that don’t offer varsity hockey.

As the backup to the backup, Beaton understood all of the particulars of his role. Playing time figured to be rare — thus the importance of displaying maximum effort during practice.

“That was my way of being a good teammate and supporting the rest of the guys,” he said.

Initially, no decision was made to allow Beaton to travel to road games with the Friars. However, it didn’t take Leaman long to realize that his No. 3 goalie merited greater consideration. When PC played two games in Belfast, Northern Ireland, over Thanksgiving, Beaton was there. When the Friars went to Pittsburgh for a post-Christmas tournament, Beaton went.

“It was awesome to see that side of the commitment,” Beaton said.

It was during the Friars’ two-game stay in Pittsburgh when Beaton officially etched his name into the program’s all-time player register. On Dec. 29, the Friars were up, 5-0, in the third period against Arizona State University when Leaman tapped Beaton on the shoulder and told him to get loose. A few minutes later, Beaton was told to get out on the ice for his Division I debut.

“It’s a moment where you almost black out because you can’t believe it’s happening. My first thought was to not let in a goal because you want to preserve the shutout, but after 30 seconds, I felt completely comfortable,” said Beaton.

Beaton played the final 1 minute, 57 seconds of an eventual 6-0 Friar win. He didn’t face a shot, but that didn’t matter. What did was seeing the expression on his teammates’ faces as they skated over to congratulate him after the final horn.

“It meant a lot to see the joy and excitement my teammates had for me. It also gave me a lot of motivation to keep doing what I was doing,” Beaton said.

As Beaton will attest, there are many ways to make one’s college experience memorable. Besides hockey and studying abroad, he also found time to become involved with the Finance Society and the Accounting Association. Since his first year, he hosted a weekly program on PC radio station WDOM-FM. He will graduate with honors on Sunday, May 20, and as a member of Beta Gamma Sigma, a distinction reserved for the top students in the College’s School of Business.

“My number one priority is academics. That’s why I came to Providence, but playing varsity hockey during my senior year is something that will define my college experience,” Beaton said.

Added Leaman, “I give Jake a ton of credit. He did it all with a smile on his face and a positive attitude. He brought great energy to the rink every single day.”

Top scholar Kristin Hayman ’18 kicks academic pursuits into high gear

Kristin Hayman '18, who is graduating with a perfect 4.0 grade-point average, is the top-ranked student in the Class of 2018.
Kristin Hayman ’18, who is graduating with a perfect 4.0 grade-point average, is the top-ranked student in the Class of 2018.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is the first in a series of stories about students in the Class of 2018 as Providence College prepares to celebrate its One Hundredth Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 20, 2018, at 11 a.m. at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center, Providence.

By Vicki-Ann Downing

The student with the top academic rank in the Class of 2018 is Kristin Hayman ’18 (Redmond, Wash.), a biology major and women’s soccer player.

Hayman transferred to Providence College from Gonzaga University at the start of her junior year. She attained a perfect 4.00 grade-point average during her two years at PC while playing in 34 games as a center midfielder. Combined with her transfer credits from Gonzaga, where she studied human physiology, she is the top students in the class and will graduate with summa cum laude honors.

“It’s a unique story,” said Sam Lopes, the head women’s soccer coach. “You move across the country, primarily because you’re looking for a different opportunity from a playing perspective, but you don’t want to do it at the expense of the academic side. Kristin is a prime example that you can do both. She was able to deal with the rigors of being an NCAA Division I athlete, playing in a major conference like the BIG EAST, and still excel in a rigorous major.”

To catch up as a transfer student, Hayman was required to study two semesters of Development of Western Civilization, PC’s signature academic program. One of her favorite classes was her DWC colloquium, Love Never Fails: Grace, Truth, and Freedom in the Nazi Era, taught by Dr. Vance G. Morgan, professor of philosophy, and Dr. Raymond L. Sickinger ’71, professor of history and of public and community service studies.

As a center midfielder, Kristin Hayman '18, played in 34 games in her two years with the Friars.
As a center midfielder, Kristin Hayman ’18 played in 34 games in her two years with the Friars.

“We looked at everything from the perspective of trying to find positive voices and people that had a positive impact on that time in history, along with learning a lot of interesting things about that period, good or bad or in between,” Hayman said.

Hayman credits her academic success to her ability to manage time. She has played competitive soccer since age 6 and excelled academically in high school, but was “taken aback” when she first realized how demanding college would be.

“It struck me that I really needed to be organized because at the end of the day, one of the big factors is being able to get enough sleep,” Hayman said. “I thought, ‘Wow, I wouldn’t feel good about showing up to practice without a good bit of energy.’ In high school I was organized, but I got into bad sleep patterns. At that age, it was OK. In college, it is a big transition to balance the academic workload. It’s an adjustment, for sure.”

Denise A. Godin, senior associate dean of undergraduate and graduate studies, got to know Hayman during the transfer process.

“She was a transfer student willing to swap one U.S. coast for another to complete her undergraduate education — we had that in common,” said Godin, who transferred from the East Coast to the West Coast as a student. “It was clear from the outset that our advising relationship was a definite partnership. We kept each other honest and accurate as we mapped out her program of study each semester.”

Kristin Hayman '18
Kristin Hayman ’18

Godin said she didn’t notice Hayman’s academic success until her senior year.

“I was both excited and nervous for her. After all, this was a dedicated athlete in a rigorous program of study,” Godin said. “She politely shrugged off my excitement and reminded me through her words and actions that it was her humility and work ethic that better reflected her brilliance.”

As an athlete, Hayman was impressive, too, Lopes said.

“People won’t realize all the other intangibles you can’t learn from a GPA or the grades you get,” Lopes said. “She is mature, well-spoken, a great leader, and timely with her words. Sometimes people who want to be leaders feel they should always talk to be heard, but she has the gift to speak at the right time, with the right words, to be powerful.

“Kristin is hardworking, intrinsically motivated, and very coachable, wanting to get feedback. She was the first to arrive, the last to leave, and always gave an honest effort as if it was the last game of her career.”

At the soccer team’s annual banquet in January, Hayman received the Maximize Today Award, presented to the player who has excelled athletically and academically. She also was recognized by the College Sports Information Directors of America, which named her to the 2017 Academic All-District Women’s Soccer Third Team for achievements athletically and in the classroom.

Hayman will present the class oration at the Academic Awards Ceremony on Saturday, May 19, at 11 a.m. in the Peterson Recreation Center.

She would like to pursue a career in which she could make a positive impact on the environment, possibly studying to become an environmental engineer. But more immediately, she has hired an agent to explore the possibility of playing professional soccer in Europe.

“I want to keep playing if I can,” Hayman said.

Being a student-athlete is “obviously a lot of work and not for everyone, but if I were to go back and do it again, I wouldn’t hesitate,” she said. “A huge part of what I’ve taken away is the teammates that I spent so much time with, on and off the field together, the memories we’ve made, and those teammates being really good friends.”