New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science... MORE

Hypothes.is

Posted by: on June 16, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and online resources easy for everyone to annotate. Annotations can be used to leave comments on specific lines of text (rather than in a comments section), provide citations, view what other researchers have commented, or take notes for personal use.

Hypothes.is is available as a bookmarklet, a Google Chrome extension, and as an addition to a website. For more information or to get started annotating, visit the Hypothes.is website.

Hypothes.is_logo

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online... MORE

Open Access Science Research in Europe

Posted by: on June 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. Rebecca’s professional focus is academic libraries, research and research education, and digital publishing. Rebecca will be providing more posts during her internship, so stay tuned!]

Recently, the Netherlands EU Presidency announced that all publicly-funded scientific research in Europe will be published as open access by 2020. They also released The “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science,” a document which lists the goals, steps, and benefits of open access in the sciences.

Releasing scientific research as open access articles will make new research more relevant and available to researchers, as well as interested citizens. Open science “has the potential to increase the quality and benefits of science by making it faster, more responsive to societal challenges, more inclusive and more accessible to new users” (“The Amsterdam Call for Action” 4, 2016). By making these articles freely available, new research can be read as soon it comes out by anyone who’s interested, rather than requiring access through a university after an embargo period or paid access to a single article. Open access in the sciences will also benefit those outside the science field. The Call for Action notes that by making research available to the public, entrepreneurs can use the findings to come up with new products and services.

A link to the full-text of the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science” is provided at European University Association News.

Open Science

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School... MORE