The MediaHub Gets A Welcome Upgrade

The MediaHub Gets A Welcome Upgrade

Posted by: on June 15, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard for the last few months revamping the MediaHub with the intent of making it a more active workspace for students, faculty, and staff.  The intention is to make this more like a “Makerspace,” as many other libraries have done across the country.  This is still a work in progress, but we have acquired a few items to get closer to reaching our goal of a creating a fully functioning Makerspace-type lab. The lab includes four iMacs that include a host of audio and video editing software, such as Adobe Premiere, Final Cut Pro, and Adobe Audition. The lab also includes microphones and audio interface devices that can be used for podcasting, etc. And we recently added a green screen kit that includes lights and a tripod to hold various cameras, so that students can create compelling video and still camera projects.  Additionally, we purchased a button maker and a few smartphone VR headsets to add to the creative process.  Please come by the MediaHub and get creative!

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard for the last few months revamping the MediaHub with the intent of making it a more active workspace for students, faculty, and staff.  The intention is to make this more like a “Makerspace,” as many other libraries have done across the country.  This is still a work in progress, […]MORE

Engaging Users and Remixing Content: New York Public Library’s Digital Collections

Posted by: on February 12, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic views of the U.S., but as I delved deeper, I discovered all of the exciting tools and initiatives that they’ve integrated into the collections to encourage discovery, interaction, sharing, research, and reuse. In particular, I’ve been musing on the fantastic visual browsing tool. Data visualization is still often thought of simply as a graphic, sometimes interactive, representation of statistics and other data, but it also clearly has so much potential as a tool for discovery, by helping users to better understand the scope of the information that they’re searching or exploring.

A thousand skaters, Central Park

Strohmeyer & Wyman, “A thousand skaters, Central Park” (1889), stereoscopic image (via NYPL)

Beyond content visualization, NYPL is championing active user/content engagement with the Digital Collections API, a Remix Residency program and other tools from the creative folks at NYPL Labs, like The Green Book trip planner, which uses “locations extracted from mid-20th century motor guides that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, and other destinations where Black travelers would be welcome.”

For those of us who spend most of our days in the weeds of content management, NYPL’s Digital Collections initiatives are a great reminder to think innovatively about how we can better connect and engage users with digital collections.

For some Friday fun, check out their Stereogranimator and create some 3D images!

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic […]MORE

Jerry Lewis Archive to be Preserved by Library of Congress

Posted by: on September 17, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Photo by Don Ornitz
Globe Photos, Inc.

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; home movies of Lewis at work and play; fully scripted motion pictures produced by Lewis at home; and rare footage of Martin and Lewis doing their nightclub act, among other material. Lewis himself will be present to perform at the opening event, “An Evening with Jerry Lewis”, on October 9th at Culpeper’s State Theatre. The Packard Campus houses collections for other comedians as well, including Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, and Sid Caesar. For more about the Library of Congress’s collections, please visit loc.gov. (Sources: 1, 2)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; […]MORE

UT Libraries release Derris collection

Posted by: on April 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to music composed by local folk musicians, as well as slide shows of iconic Smoky Mountain locales.

Read more about the project here  |  View the collection here!

Approximately 4,400 slides and eight reels of 8mm film shot by Derris were donated to UT Libraries. The film footage was first digitized, and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips.

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to […]MORE

Providence College Army Specialized Training Program Site Now Live

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/.

astp

PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) for leadership roles within the Army during World War II.  During the program’s short tenure over 500 soldiers from around the country lived and took classes at Providence College. The ASTP Program was important to Providence College as it kept enrollments up during the war. The program concluded nationally when soldiers were needed on the battlefields of Europe as war efforts increased.

PC’s ASTP collection includes video, photographs, correspondence, newspaper coverage, archival materials, and more.  While the site remains a work in progress in terms of organization and curation, it is complete in terms of presenting digitized content.  Please explore the collection and let us know if you have thoughts or feedback using the commenting feature on each item’s page, or be emailing us at dps@providence.edu.  We are especially interested in identifying individuals pictured in the collection photographs.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/. PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) […]MORE

Sneak Peak: Army Specialized Training Program Site

Posted by: on January 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

astp-homepage

We’ve been working on a new site designed to allow for the exploration of media related to the Providence College ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program). Users will have access to historical photos, articles, and correspondence relating to PC’s ASTP, dating back to World War II. The collection can be experienced through pre-made exhibits (sorted by media type), or by searching across the entire collection. The site is being built on top of a customized instance of Omeka, and should be live on the library.providence.edu web space “soon”.

Stay tuned for more updates and an announcement when we go live with the site!

 

We’ve been working on a new site designed to allow for the exploration of media related to the Providence College ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program). Users will have access to historical photos, articles, and correspondence relating to PC’s ASTP, dating back to World War II. The collection can be experienced through pre-made exhibits (sorted by […]MORE

4DSound & the Future of Library Media Spaces

Posted by: on November 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

4dsys_full_front

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than just stereo; its sixteen vertical speaker columns and complex control system can reproduce sounds in a way unlike anything heard before. Listeners can move through the space, experiencing sounds move around them over time – even sometimes giving the illusion that one is passing between the present and the past.

What does this futuristic system have to do with libraries? Well, if the technology behind it becomes more accessible, we could see a huge shift in experiencing media, especially within libraries of the future. If libraries continue aligning themselves with user media expectations, and even become instructional centers for new media, they may soon host experimental spaces similar to 4DSound – spaces for their community to realize applications yet to be conceived. What’s more, imagine how this might impact music librarianship: the release of new 4d-enchanced audio providing patrons a greater sense of how spatial sound is.

Now, of course, not all advances in media forever change the landscape (quadrophonic sound anyone?), but more generally we in libraries should keep our ear to the ground (excuse the bad wordplay…) to know what may becoming, and what we might be able to bring to our patrons if they haven’t brought it to us first.

While you’re waiting for the future to arrive, please enjoy this video of a recent hack session at 4DSound as inspiration: http://vimeo.com/111579911.

 

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than […]MORE

Free Audio Resources without Copyright Restrictions

Posted by: on September 30, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions that a student’s video project would be more effective with the use of music.  Teachers might find these sites useful to explain copyright issues to students in regards to stealing music, etc. from the web, by showing them what music is actually in the public domain and has a Creative Commons License. Of course, these sites might also Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 11.29.51 AMbenefit teachers for their own projects, as well.

A few great sites for finding free music include:

  • Free Music Archive: This is a great site that hosts a wide range of music genres in a high quality format, free of charge.
  • Sound Bible: This site is an excellent source for various sound effects, such as: dog barks, city sounds, wind sounds, etc.
  • SoundGator: This is also a great site for various sound effects, sound bites and sound clips that are in the public domain with a Creative Commons License.

 

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions […]MORE

Hoopla and borrowing digital media

Posted by: on February 27, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

hoopla

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per individual use but allows for unlimited simultaneous access.

The Kansas City library will limit patrons to 12 Hoopla checkouts a month. Each episode of a TV show is one checkout.

But patrons have access to videos for 72 hours, to music CDs for seven days and to audiobooks for three weeks. After the time is up, the material is automatically deleted, eliminating the possibility of late-return fees.

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per […]MORE

Dynamic Shape Display & Motion Synth (New Forms of Interactivity)

Posted by: on December 6, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

We in Digital Publishing Services try to closely follow new advances in computing and multimedia, particularly if they directly impact scholarly or artistic creation. So, it was quite exciting to find out about two new projects that could significantly influence creative technologies over the next few years. Here, for your interest, are demo videos of the two systems: the inFORM dynamic shape display and the Motion Synth for iPhone and iPod Touch.

inFORM dynamic shape display (MIT)

The first is a “dynamic shape display” developed by MIT’s Tangible Media Group. This interface allows users to “interact with digital information in a tangible way” by physically rendering 3D content through a grid of digitally-controlled columns. It’s a very captivating project, and seems to have potential both in terms of teaching and creative generation, but also as a useful technology for disabilities access.

Motion Synth for iPhone and iPod Touch (AUUG)

AUUG’s Motion Synth offers a simple solution for gestural composition with the iPhone – an specially-designed aluminum frame that is fastened around the user’s hand, ensuring that the device won’t fall and that access to the touch screen isn’t impeded. While this may seem like just a matter of ergonomics at first, AUUG has also create a program that would utilize the device’s internal sensing, relaying the physical information back to a compatible musical software or hardware. In effect, you can modify sounds in new, physically expressive ways through this system. One can envision this offering a very unique and approachable way of creating and engaging with multimedia works.

For more information, see the project pages at MIT and AUUG:

http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/

http://www.auug.com/

We in Digital Publishing Services try to closely follow new advances in computing and multimedia, particularly if they directly impact scholarly or artistic creation. So, it was quite exciting to find out about two new projects that could significantly influence creative technologies over the next few years. Here, for your interest, are demo videos of […]MORE

MediaHub Tutorials

Posted by: on September 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video production; basic audio editing; media backup and archiving; online video services; and more! So, here is the first installment on basic video production. In the video, I’ll demonstrate to you how to record video, transfer it to an iMac, edit the footage in iMovie, and share the final project on YouTube. And certainly, if anyone viewing this has questions following the video, you are more than welcome to contact the DPS department at dps@providence.edu.

Stay tuned for other installments!

http://bit.ly/dpstutorials

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video […]MORE

MediaHub Video Update

Posted by: on July 19, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

With its development moving right along, seems that it’s time to provide another installment in our MediaHub video series! In this video, I give another quick tour of the space as it is now, and discuss some of the equipment the MediaHub will offer our patrons. It’s a great experience to see this new collaborative space take shape in the Phillips Memorial Library, and it is our hope that the Providence College community feels similarly. Stay tuned for more updates as the summer moves along!

With its development moving right along, seems that it’s time to provide another installment in our MediaHub video series! In this video, I give another quick tour of the space as it is now, and discuss some of the equipment the MediaHub will offer our patrons. It’s a great experience to see this new collaborative […]MORE

Check out Shelf.io

Posted by: on July 11, 2013   |Comments (2)|Spotlights

Shelf.ioThe folks over at the Harvard Innovation Lab have created a very interesting tool/website called Shelf.io. What is shelf.io exactly? Well, it is, essentially, a collection of shelves. Shelves that are initially empty, but can be filled with all of your favorite things (bookmarks, books, media, just about anything). These shelves can be made public for all the internet to see, or private so that only you can see.

Shelf.io was created using the StackView jQuery plugin and is open source under the MIT and GPL licenses. If you’re feeling up to editing up your own version of Shelf.io grab the github code here.

I’ve started up my own personal Shelf.io at shelf.io/marcmestre. I’ve got two shelves that I’m working on currently, one is a showcase of all of the interesting Digital Publishing Services projects we’re working on, and the other is a collection of links to useful resources that I use a lot in my work. Check them both out! And while you’re at it, get your own shelf.io and start organizing some shelves of your own!

The folks over at the Harvard Innovation Lab have created a very interesting tool/website called Shelf.io. What is shelf.io exactly? Well, it is, essentially, a collection of shelves. Shelves that are initially empty, but can be filled with all of your favorite things (bookmarks, books, media, just about anything). These shelves can be made public […]MORE

First Video Tour of the MediaHub

Posted by: on June 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Last year, a proposal originated from within our department to develop a library-based multimedia center –  specifically, one that would assist and inspire Providence College faculty, staff, and student scholars in their digital media-inclusive work. After receiving approval from Academic Affairs, the now interdepartmental project – known currently as the MediaHub – has moved forward at a stunning rate. We have received much of the requested equipment and will be setting up the space over the summer, with a soft launch during the Fall 2013 semester. For those interested in seeing this space come to life, here is the first in a video series on the MediaHub, its complement, and our aims in offering this space. Keep posted for future installments!

Last year, a proposal originated from within our department to develop a library-based multimedia center –  specifically, one that would assist and inspire Providence College faculty, staff, and student scholars in their digital media-inclusive work. After receiving approval from Academic Affairs, the now interdepartmental project – known currently as the MediaHub – has moved forward […]MORE