Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
The Library of Congress's new homepage (Source)

The Library of Congress’s new homepage (Source)

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as part of the larger redesign of their site, currently in the works. The Library’s blog, The Signal, recently published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the Library of Congress, where she discussed user experience (UX) and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative, led by Smith. One of Project One’s biggest challenges, says Smith, is that the Library started sharing their (vast amount of) content early on the web, using older technologies, and a substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate the old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions need to be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata needs to be assigned to items. Once that foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to view the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as... MORE

Collections as Data 2016 Conference

Posted by: on September 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

CollectionsAsData 1A
On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website provides the following description for the event:

“The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.”

Participants had the option of attending in-person or virtually, as the event was live-streamed on the Library of Congress YouTube channel; members of the Digital Publishing Services team attended sessions virtually throughout the day. Sessions were open to the public and organizers asked that attendees use the hashtag #AsData in their tags. A video recording of the conference has been archived on the LOC YouTube channel. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website. (Source)

On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website... MORE

Library of Congress Passes New Exemption to Copyright Law

Posted by: on November 25, 2015   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against the theft of intellectual property, and it renews and expands protections for fair use. Request for the exemption comes in reaction to a law that forbids users from breaking Digital Rights Management (DRM), as users often have to circumvent DRM to make full use of their devices. DRM is, “a term referring to various access control technologies that are used to restrict the usage of proprietary software, hardware, or content. DRM includes technologies that control the use, modification, and distribution of copyrighted works, as well as systems within devices that enforce these policies.” (source)

Proponents of DRM argue that it is necessary to prevent intellectual property from being duplicated, helps copyright holders maintain artistic control, and ensures continued revenue streams. Conversely, opponents to DRM argue that there is no evidence that it helps prevent copyright infringement, serves only to inconvenience customers, and helps big business stifle innovation and competition. The exemptions will go into effect in 2016 and are up for review and approval again in 3 years. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their... MORE

Jerry Lewis Archive to be Preserved by Library of Congress

Posted by: on September 17, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Photo by Don Ornitz
Globe Photos, Inc.

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; home movies of Lewis at work and play; fully scripted motion pictures produced by Lewis at home; and rare footage of Martin and Lewis doing their nightclub act, among other material. Lewis himself will be present to perform at the opening event, “An Evening with Jerry Lewis”, on October 9th at Culpeper’s State Theatre. The Packard Campus houses collections for other comedians as well, including Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, and Sid Caesar. For more about the Library of Congress’s collections, please visit loc.gov. (Sources: 1, 2)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard... MORE

At the Museum: Library of Congress Blog

Posted by: on November 13, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The Library of Congress, Digital Preservation website has a blog called At the Museum, which highlights various museum’s digital collections and the people who work with these collections.  The most recent blog has an interview with Ellice Engdahl, Digital Collections & Content Manager, and Brian Wilson, Digital Access and Preservation Archivist of the Henry Ford Museum.  Previous posts include an interview with Marla Misunas, Collections Information Manager for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Please check it out! Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.17.02 AMScreen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.16.54 AM

 

The Library of Congress, Digital Preservation website has a blog called At the Museum, which highlights various museum’s digital collections... MORE

LC Shares Free, Interactive eBooks

Posted by: on September 17, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources
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table of contents for the Harlem Renaissance book

The Library of Congress recently made available six interactive ebooks for use by educators, students, and the public.  The books, referred to as the Student Discovery Set, cover a range of topics including: the Constitution, the Dust Bowl,the Harlem Renaissance, Immigration, Symbols of the United States, and Understanding the Cosmos.  The books are available for the iPad and can be downloaded for free on iBooks.

Each book includes 15-20 primary sources.  Interactive tools let students zoom in for close examination, draw to highlight interesting details and make notes about what they discover.  The end of each book provides a detailed list of citation information for each source, as well as link to it within the Library of Congress collections.

This set is of interest to us in DPS for a couple of reasons.  It serves as an interesting model of publishing content using the iBook format, something we are also currently investigating.  It also demonstrates the power of curating digital collections as open educational resources for use in classrooms.

Visit the LC site to download the books! http://www.loc.gov/teachers/student-discovery-sets/

The Library of Congress recently made available six interactive ebooks for use by educators, students, and the public.  The books,... MORE

The National Jukebox at the Library of Congress

Posted by: on April 15, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally.Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 10.36.47 AM

The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.

You can find out more about the project here .

This project often involves a painstaking process of analyzing various copies of the same 78rpm recording  and finding just the right one for digitization.

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Here is a slideshow example of the workflow process from beginning to end.

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from... MORE