Playing with Palladio

Playing with Palladio

Posted by: on October 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters, and trends within data that may be difficult for an individual researcher interacting with the data to see.  Palladio serves as a means of enhancing (not replacing) traditional qualitative humanities research methods.  Data can be mapped, graphed to show network relationships, viewed and faceted as an interactive gallery, and more.  Palladio comes out of Stanford University’s Humanities + Design research lab.

I’m enrolled in an Introduction to Digital Humanities course through Library Juice Academy.  One of my assignments this week requires an examination of Palladio (as well as a similar tool, Google Fusion Tables).  Palladio peaked my interest.  My initial introduction and interaction with Palladio came through the very helpful Getting Started With Palladio tutorial by Miriam Posner.  This tutorial provides clear, easy to follow instructions for uploading data into Palladio and beginning to work with the data tools- definitely check it out.

After completing the Posner’s tutorial I got inspired to apply Palladio to some data we have access to through DPS projects.  I took a few minutes to aggregate data from a couple of different spreadsheets around the Dorr Letters Project.  My data looks like this:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.27.34 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

In less than a minute I was able to create this visualization graphing the “to” and “from” fields:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.26.07 PM

 

 

 

 

And this map showing the origination location for each item of correspondence:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.38.00 PM

 

 

 

 

I’ll continue to play with Palladio and update this post accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters,... MORE

#ReCollectingRI: The Dorr Letters

Posted by: on November 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

What does the past mean to you?  What comes to your mind when you think of Rhode Island history?  These questions are at the heart of the #ReCollectingRI project, an effort of the Rhode Island Historical Society to engage all Rhode Islanders with our past.

Here at the Phillips Memorial Library one of our digital collections presents a very interesting glimpse into Rhode Island history.  For that reason, we share our Dorr Letters to #ReCollectingRI.

2015-11-09_1013The Dorr Letters web site currently presents 60 letters written to and from Thomas Wilson Dorr around the time of the Dorr Rebellion in 1842.  The letters present an important glimpse into how this critical event unfolded.  You can view the original manuscripts on the site, or read their transcriptions.  The site also provides contextual information about many of the important peoples and places that show up in the letters.

For more on #ReCollectingRI visit: http://www.rihs.org/recollectingri/ or check out the the hashtag on Facebook and TwitterWhat will you add?

 

What does the past mean to you?  What comes to your mind when you think of Rhode Island history?  These... MORE

Dorr Rebellion Lesson Plans

Posted by: on August 6, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Did you know that in addition to the documentary, the gallery, and the letters, the Dorr Rebellion Project web site also contains five lesson plans for use in the high school or post-secondary classroom?

The plans can be used independently or combined to form a unit on the Dorr Rebellion.  The lessons cover the following topics:

dorr lesson plans

Each lesson plan is aligned with specific Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics and Social Studies.  All of the lessons require that students to engage with primary source material hosted on the Dorr Rebellion web site.

In May the lesson plans were shared with local K-12 teachers at the RI Social Studies Institute.  Both the lesson plans and the web site generated a lot of enthusiasm from middle and high school teachers.

If you use the lesson plans and have feedback we’d love to hear from you.  You can comment here or email dps@providence.edu.  Happy teaching!

Did you know that in addition to the documentary, the gallery, and the letters, the Dorr Rebellion Project web site... MORE

30 more letters! Working facets! It’s another Dorr Letters site update!

Posted by: on June 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Untitled

 

 

Hello everyone!

I’ve got some great news for those who have been following the Dorr Letters site project. We’ve just finalized the encoding for 30 more letters, uploaded them to the Dorr Letters site, and updated some of the code to allow for faceting not only by date, but now by collection and author!

We’ve added more entries for the contextual “ography” popup content, and squashed a bunch of bugs and glitches!

Check out the new updates here: http://library.providence.edu:8080/xtf/index.xml

Per usual, we are not done with the site. Stay tuned for an updated home page that will be more user friendly and will make more sense of the different Dorr Letter collections!

    Hello everyone! I’ve got some great news for those who have been following the Dorr Letters site project.... MORE

Dorr Letters site, big update!

Posted by: on January 17, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

twd1_preview

Do you remember awhile back we posted a sneak peek at some of the upcoming features of the Dorr Letters site? If you don’t, no worries, check it out here. Well, we have finally gone live with those changes!

The Dorr Letters project site now includes:

  • Contextual, informative popups for most persons, places, and organizations within the letters
  • Working date facets, you can now filter letters by the date they were written
  • Working formatting templates, the plain text now mirrors some of the formatting of the actual letters.

Go to the Dorr Letters project site, and check out the updates!

Do you remember awhile back we posted a sneak peek at some of the upcoming features of the Dorr Letters... MORE

Happy New Year

Posted by: on January 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Happy New Year from the Digital Publishing Services Team!  For us, the new year has meant welcoming a new team member – Stephen Mattos.  Stephen has extensive digitization experience and photography skills.  Most recently, Stephen worked at Roger Williams University where he was the Digital Imaging Specialist in the Architecture Library.  He focused on the digitization and archiving of their slide collection.  We welcome Stephen and look forward to working with him.

There are lots of exciting projects on our horizon for Spring 2014, including:

  • an update to the Dorr Letters Project
  • further collaboration with Special Collections and Archives on digitization projects including digitization of the Army Specialized Training Program collection
  • launch of the Art Journal in Digital Commons, a journal created and edited by PC Art History and Studio Art students
  • continued development of the MediaHub
  • and much more!

We will highlight many of these projects here on the Digital Publishing @ PC Blog.  Hope to see you again soon!

 

 

Happy New Year from the Digital Publishing Services Team!  For us, the new year has meant welcoming a new team... MORE

Dorr Letters Site: Update In The Works

Posted by: on October 16, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Dorr Popups

The Dorr Letters site will be looking a bit differently in the coming weeks. We’ve been at work creating and implementing some new content that will be weaved into each letter. The goal is to allow users the ability to click on the name of a person, place, or organization and be served a quick morsel of information about that person/place/organization. We’re currently working on setting up this workflow for all three information types as well as filling out the content behind the curtains so that none of the popups come up empty!

We took a bit of inspiration from the Colonial Despatches website created by the Humanities Computing and Media Centre, University of Victoria:

Check out their work here: http://bcgenesis.uvic.ca/index.htm

The Dorr Letters site will be looking a bit differently in the coming weeks. We’ve been at work creating and... MORE

Dorr Letters and XTF

Posted by: on June 7, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

http://library.providence.edu:8080/xtf/icons/default/dorrlogo.jpg

Just recently, Digital Publishing Services finished a semester long endeavor to put together a website with the purpose of sharing both the digital transcriptions and the original scans of the Dorr letters. The site is built on XTF (eXtensible Text Framework), which is a free, open source platform that provides a super customizable framework for working with the transforming and display of TEI (and many other encoding languages). The beauty of XTF lies within it’s text indexer tool, it automatically creates an index of your documents which then allows for search-ability across the entire collection, or within each document. XTF can be a bit daunting to learn for a newcomer as there are very many moving parts, that said I’d still recommend it, there are a number of helpful tutorials and documentation and the XTF community is strong and usually quick to help. If you’re working with XTF I’d suggest joining the XTF User List on Google groups immediately!

At present the project includes digital transcriptions of thirty letters from the Dorr Correspondence files in the Sidney S. Rider Collection at the John Hay Library (Brown University), the James Fowler Simmons Papers at the Library of Congress, the Gilder Lehrman Institute, and one letter from the private collection of Richard Slaney. These letters illustrate aspects of race, reform, antislavery and proslavery politics, and, of course, the Dorr Rebellion.

To see our XTF implementation in action, visit the Dorr Letters project page. You can browse or search through the Dorr letters. Once on a letter page you can then click “view page #” to see the original scan of that page. There also exists an option to view the raw TEI.

The letters were selected, edited, and transcribed from the original manuscripts by Dr. Erik J. Chaput and Russell DeSimone, with the assistance of Dr. Edward E. Andrews.

The letters were encoded by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons Digital Publishing Services team including Deborah Angelo, Mark Caprio, Rachel Golub, Christiane Marie Landry, Marc Mestre, and  Hailie Posey.

Also, be sure to visit the Dorr Rebellion project page to learn more about the Dorr Rebellion. The site was recently updated with lesson plans created specifically for interaction with the Dorr Letters site. We will be doing some more updating to the site later this summer, so be sure to check back in.

Project questions or comments may be sent to dps@providence.edu

Just recently, Digital Publishing Services finished a semester long endeavor to put together a website with the purpose of sharing... MORE