Prince and Copyright

Prince and Copyright

Posted by: on June 29, 2017   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news since his untimely passing and two stories of note have emerged in recent months.

The first centers around a fair use debate, similar in nature to a case covered in a previous post about Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a photo as inspiration: The estate of Andy Warhol has filed suit against New York City photographer Lynn Goldsmith as a preemptive strike to protect Warhol’s legacy. According to the NY Daily News, Goldsmith had been expected to file a copyright infringement lawsuit against the estate. Goldsmith alleges that Warhol used a photo she took of Prince in 1981 as inspiration for his Prince Series (created in 1984) without asking permission or crediting her.

The estate argues that Warhol’s appropriation of the photo was transformative enough to be considered new work (therefore, meeting the terms of fair use under U.S. copyright law) and allege Goldsmith’s objective is extortion. Estate lawyer Luke Nikas stated in court documents that, “Although Warhol often used photographs taken by others as inspiration for his portraits, Warhol’s works were entirely new creations. As would be plain to any reasonable observer, each portrait in Warhol’s Prince Series fundamentally transformed the visual aesthetic and meaning of the Prince Publicity Photograph.” When asked why she did not pursue legal measures at any point over the past 30 years, Goldsmith said that she was only made aware of the pieces in 2016, when Condé Nast published a special issue called The Genius of Prince. The estate counters that she knew of the pieces as far back as 1984, when she granted permission to Vanity Fair to publish one of them.

Prince’s image isn’t the only thing sparking debate – his catalog of work is, as well. While his Warner Bros. music catalog was released earlier this year to digital streaming platforms, his videography remains largely inaccessible to the public due to copyright disputes. Will his full videography eventually be made available? And further, will the public ever gain access to the material in his Paisley Park estate’s storied vault? It’s been speculated that nearly all contents of the vault lack thorough rights contracts.

Prince’s estate has been in flux for some time, as it’s battled to resolve contractual disputes over copyright issues with Warner and Universal. Since his passing in April 2016, various issues involving copyright have arisen. The public’s collective hope is for speedy resolution to copyright matters so all may freely access his work. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news since his untimely passing and two stories of note have emerged in recent months. The first centers around a fair use debate, similar in nature to a case covered in a previous post about Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a […]MORE

Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection Releases Hundreds of Digitized Images

Posted by: on April 21, 2017   |Comment (1)|Digital Asset Management

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. New pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s personal archive. Adler served as director of publicity for Def Jam Records and Rush Artist Management from 1984-1990, where he worked alongside producers Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons during an era when the label released notable albums by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys, Slick Rick, Run-DMC, EPMD, and De La Soul. Cornell’s curator of rare books and manuscripts, Katherine Reagan, comments that, “Bill’s files are a rich and deep resource for the study of hip-hop’s emergence in the popular press and as a force within the music industry, and they enrich our understanding of hip-hop’s 40-year history.”

The Hip Hop Collection is part of the Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. They received Adler’s archive in 2013 and the newly added pieces represent only 5 percent of the full archive. The rest can be seen in person at the library, for now; they plan to digitize the rest of Adler’s archive over the next few years. The most recent batch includes over 1700 images. Adler started collecting in the 70s, when there were few resources about hip-hop and the internet did not exist. “But there was a tremendous explosion of writing about hip-hop in real time,” he said. “I’m thrilled to know that the collection is going to be made available to anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection, anywhere in the world.” (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. New pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s […]MORE

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Library of Congress's new homepage

The Library of Congress’s new homepage

On Tuesday November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled a redesign of their homepage, which comes as part of a larger redesign of the site currently in the works. On October 27th, the Library’s blog The Signal published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the LOC, wherein she discussed user experience and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative led by Smith and one of its greatest challenges, she says, is that the LOC started sharing their vast amount of content early on the web, using older technologies, and substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions must be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata must be assigned to records. Once the foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to read the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled a redesign of their homepage, which comes as part of a larger redesign of the site currently in the works. On October 27th, the Library’s blog The Signal published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the LOC, […]MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the […]MORE

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks. They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, in addition to other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release […]MORE

Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies

Posted by: on March 18, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous issues not only in New England, but also in the United States and internationally”. The discussion centered on “the use of digital media to foster education, research, and outreach within Indigenous communities and studies.” There was a focus on how digital media and tools can help to create connections between people and materials, as well as the importance of relationship-building with Native communities, the ethics surrounding these projects, and project management issues of resource allocation, stewardship, and sustainability.

I was particularly impressed with Tobias Glaza and Paul Grant-Costa’s Yale Indian Papers Project. They focused on the importance of Indigenous communities as stakeholders in the project and collaborating with community members right from the beginning to answer questions like – What’s most important to the community? How do they tell their stories? What information should remain private? How do they want to access and use their digital history? With this approach, they published the New England Indian Papers Series – “a scholarly critical edition of New England Native American primary source materials gathered into one robust virtual collection.” Built on Yale’s Ladybird software and using a Blacklight front-end, the platform is clean and easy-to-use, and includes a document reader, scholarly transcription, and extensive metadata.

An eye-opening takeaway from Alyssa Mt. Pleasant’s presentation on the American Indian Studies (AIS) resources portal that she built at Yale, is the importance of maintaining a project’s stewardship to ensure its longevity. Unfortunately, the AIS portal, which took 3 years to build, wasn’t taken on by anyone else when she left Yale, and consequently, is no longer accessible.

Lisa Brooks from Amherst College gave a fantastic talk on the problem of trying to understand the history of Native spaces when the main existing reference points are colonial maps. She’s worked extensively on creating new historical maps of Indigenous spaces to support her research and is also engaged in the idea of maps as storytelling, often combining her maps with present-day photos of the locations to bring them to life. Her work is included in Amherst’s digital map collection, which was created using Esri’s ArcGIS platform, and is definitely worth checking out.

Another standout was Dana Leibsohn’s project, Vistas, which “seeks to bring an understanding of the visual culture of Spanish America to a broad audience.” Vistas was designed as a non-linear platform, in an effort to encourage multiple pathways between content that would support research in a variety of scholarly disciplines, as well as less formal modes of education and learning. Launched in the late 90’s, Vistas has undergone three major evolutions, from a website hosted by Smith College, to a DVD, and now back to an online version hosted by Fordham University. Dr. Leibsohn’s stewardship of the project over the years has clearly been integral to its longevity, which includes her commitment to tackling the challenges of migrating the platform to keep up with ever-evolving technologies.

There were also a couple of great discussions surrounding endangered Native languages, including a conversation on the power of digital activism to increase online, and particularly social media usage of these languages, as a way of preserving them.

Obviously all of these projects are contributing to content-collection, digital preservation, and scholarship needs, but it was great to hear that so many are focused on supporting Indigenous communities by facilitating access to their histories, preserving them, and ultimately, helping to amplify the voices of these communities.

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous […]MORE

The MTV 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

120 Minutes 1995-98 logo

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was a 2-hour after hours alternative music block that featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. The show was canceled without formal announcement in May 2003, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer (the host at the time) and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. 120 Minutes made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011 but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013.

The 120 Minutes archive

The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder (identified as Tyler) and a team of volunteers. It doesn’t present each episode in its originally recorded form; it instead lists guest artists, hosts, and videos by episode and links out to the YouTube versions of all videos featured. Visitors can view listings by year or episode. The site is presented in tiered form, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings and details.

The Cramps in 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (The Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet. The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes but quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was a 2-hour after hours alternative music block that featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. […]MORE

Engaging Users and Remixing Content: New York Public Library’s Digital Collections

Posted by: on February 12, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic views of the U.S., but as I delved deeper, I discovered all of the exciting tools and initiatives that they’ve integrated into the collections to encourage discovery, interaction, sharing, research, and reuse. In particular, I’ve been musing on the fantastic visual browsing tool. Data visualization is still often thought of simply as a graphic, sometimes interactive, representation of statistics and other data, but it also clearly has so much potential as a tool for discovery, by helping users to better understand the scope of the information that they’re searching or exploring.

A thousand skaters, Central Park

Strohmeyer & Wyman, “A thousand skaters, Central Park” (1889), stereoscopic image (via NYPL)

Beyond content visualization, NYPL is championing active user/content engagement with the Digital Collections API, a Remix Residency program and other tools from the creative folks at NYPL Labs, like The Green Book trip planner, which uses “locations extracted from mid-20th century motor guides that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, and other destinations where Black travelers would be welcome.”

For those of us who spend most of our days in the weeds of content management, NYPL’s Digital Collections initiatives are a great reminder to think innovatively about how we can better connect and engage users with digital collections.

For some Friday fun, check out their Stereogranimator and create some 3D images!

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic […]MORE

Rolling Stone Magazine Archive Available Now via Google Play

Posted by: on October 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
via Source

Rolling Stone’s digital archive (source)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free, in collaboration with Google Play. The archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and cultural reporting Rolling Stone has generated over time. The archive can be accessed via the Google Play Newsstand app on both iOS and Android devices. Articles by notable writers, including David Fricke, Hunter S. Thompson, and Cameron Crowe, and imagery by Annie Leibovitz and David LaChapelle, are among the content featured. Rolling Stone’s daily news and coverage is available via the app, as well.

Alongside the archive, Rolling Stone has introduced a feature on their website called CoverWall, which offers an immersive experience of the publication’s content, including every iconic cover from their 48-year tenure and extensive archival content. They follow in the footsteps of publications like WIRED and the New York Times with this immersive feature, which is noteworthy, as Rolling Stone was slow to enter into digital format. Gus Wenner, Head of Digital of Wenner Media notes that, “This collaboration is as much about our history as it is our future.” Brian Irving, global head of marketing for Google Play, adds, “Rolling Stone produced some of the most iconic music and political coverage in America for the past five decades. We’re proud to offer this rich history to people for free, where they can explore and interact with every issue… It’s like a highway of information, revisited.” (Sources: 1, 2)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free, in collaboration with Google Play. The archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and […]MORE

Jerry Lewis Archive to be Preserved by Library of Congress

Posted by: on September 17, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Jerry Lewis (source)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; home movies of Lewis at work and play; fully scripted motion pictures produced by Lewis at home; and rare footage of Martin and Lewis doing their nightclub act, among other material.

Lewis himself will be present to perform at the opening event, “An Evening with Jerry Lewis”, on October 9th at Culpeper’s State Theatre. The Packard Campus houses collections for other comedians as well, including Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, and Sid Caesar. For more about the Library of Congress’s collections, please visit loc.gov. (Sources: 1, 2)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; […]MORE

Andy Warhol Became First Modern Digital Artist 30 Years Ago this July

Posted by: on July 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

warhol-debbie-harryAccording to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a portrait of Debbie Harry, of the band Blondie, and essentially created a new form of modern art. According to Burmon, Warhol’s interest in computer graphics could be traced back to an introduction to them (alongside Keith Haring) by Steve Jobs at Sean Lennon’s ninth birthday party, which happened less than a year before the Amiga 1000 presentation. To learn more about Warhol’s pursuit of digital art, please visit the article here.

According to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a […]MORE

Fales Library at New York University acquires Triple Canopy archive

Posted by: on July 22, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The well known New York art journal Triple Canopy has agreed to host it’s archive at the Fales Library at New York University. The journal has been published (mostly online, though some print versions do exist) since 2007. Triple Canopy is a part of Common Practice New York and publishes physical art as well has performances and artist talks.

Browsers update, links rot and standards evolve – often at a rapid pace,” said Ms. Resnick, who initiated talks with the library about the unusual agreement. In an interview, she added: “For digital preservation you really have to be doing it and thinking about it all the time. And we just felt that it was completely beyond our capabilities.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/n-y-u-library-acquires-archive-of-the-digital-art-journal-triple-canopy/

 

The well known New York art journal Triple Canopy has agreed to host it’s archive at the Fales Library at New York University. The journal has been published (mostly online, though some print versions do exist) since 2007. Triple Canopy is a part of Common Practice New York and publishes physical art as well has performances […]MORE

DC comics coming to Hoopla

Posted by: on July 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured fashion, waiting to gauge how well they sell in more traditional markets before hosting them in the library.

Hoopla users will be able to borrow 25 of DC Entertainment’s top titles including Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Watchmen, Superman: Earth One, V for Vendetta, Final Crisis and Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Blood. Whether you’re a hardcore comic fan or just want to catch up on some of the best stories DC has ever published, it’s a pretty nice list of graphic novels.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/25/hoopla-dc-comics/

 

Learn more about Hoopla

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured […]MORE

Apple & Google Play Announce New Digital Music Streaming Services

Posted by: on June 24, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

1Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th.

Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in an open letter she penned, accusing the company of intending to stiff artists on royalties during the service’s 3-month free streaming trial period. The company has since reconsidered their decision and announced via Apple Senior Vice President Eddy Cue’s Twitter account that they will compensate artists.

Unlike Spotify, neither service allows the user to select songs playing. Google Play Product Manager Elias Roman says he believes many people will not mind this feature, as consumers are after an effortless experience. The company is relying on the behind-the-scenes work of real people, who hand select and curate available playlists; algorithms only come into play after a radio station based on artist or song has been chosen. Apple’s philosophy is similar: Their service claims to offer an “old-fashioned human-curated music playlist for the digital age,” and Apple’s music chief Jimmy Iovine says that algorithms alone “can’t do that emotional task.”

Subscribing to Google Play allows the user to take their playlists offline (as well as manipulate, edit, and rename them) and to listen without interruption. Apple will be offering their service for free for the first 3 months of use and offers individual and family plans once the trial period ends. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th. Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in […]MORE

White House Digital Initiative

Posted by: on June 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A number of major U.S. publishers have agreed to work with the White House, and president Obama, on an initiative to expand access to e-books and digital content to low income students. The goal is to provide at least 250$ million in free e-books and to provide library cards for all low income students.

Several major U.S. publishers have agreed to participate, including Simon & Schuster, Bloomsbury, Macmillan, Random House-Penguin and HarperCollins. Also, nonprofits and libraries will be teaming up to produce an app that will be able deliver the digital books. The New York Public library is working with book donation nonprofit Firstbook to develop the e-reader app for these books – many of which are already in the public domain.  (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to-announce-ebook-initiative-for-low-income-students/)

Read more about the initiative here: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to-announce-ebook-initiative-for-low-income-students/

Read the White House fact sheet here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/04/30/fact-sheet-spreading-joy-reading-more-children-and-young-adults

A number of major U.S. publishers have agreed to work with the White House, and president Obama, on an initiative to expand access to e-books and digital content to low income students. The goal is to provide at least 250$ million in free e-books and to provide library cards for all low income students. Several major […]MORE

Freegal Service Allows Free Digital Access to Music

Posted by: on May 18, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Untitled-4The Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries announced this week that they will now offer access to a service called Freegal. Freegal, a music service offered through subscribing libraries’ websites, provides free access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. Freegal’s service is provided through Library Ideas, LLC, a company based in Vienna, VA that stocks libraries with digital content and offers services like Freading eBook Service and Rocket Languages, in addition to Freegal.

All that is required to access Freegal is a valid library card with a subscribing library. Free Freegal mobile apps for Apple and Android devices are available through the Apple app store and GooglePlay for cardholders of subscribing libraries. There are limits on number of downloads allowed weekly and stream time daily. While mp3 downloads are restricted by weekly amount, they never expire and can be saved to mobile devices indefinitely. Freegal offers a similarly designed movie service that allows patrons of subscribing libraries access to thousands of movies and shows. For more on the Lubbock and Peoria public libraries’ use of Freegal, please see these articles: Lubbock Freegal, Peoria Freegal.

The Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries announced this week that they will now offer access to a service called Freegal. Freegal, a music service offered through subscribing libraries’ websites, provides free access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. Freegal’s service […]MORE

UT Libraries release Derris collection

Posted by: on April 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to music composed by local folk musicians, as well as slide shows of iconic Smoky Mountain locales.

Read more about the project here  |  View the collection here!

Approximately 4,400 slides and eight reels of 8mm film shot by Derris were donated to UT Libraries. The film footage was first digitized, and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips.

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to […]MORE

Digitally Animated Ugly Christmas Sweater

Posted by: on December 18, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party.

Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.

 

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party. Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.  MORE

New Media Hub Tutorials!

Posted by: on August 20, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard this summer creating new Media Hub video tutorials.  These tutorials emphasize equipment that is available for use in the library, or can be loaned out via the circulation desk.  Three tutorials have been added in the last 2 weeks. They include tips on using GarageBand, Audacity and options for backing up Video Media. Check them out!Screen Shot 2014-08-20 at 9.07.36 AM

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard this summer creating new Media Hub video tutorials.  These tutorials emphasize equipment that is available for use in the library, or can be loaned out via the circulation desk.  Three tutorials have been added in the last 2 weeks. They include tips on using GarageBand, Audacity and options for […]MORE

Skullphone: Digital Media

Posted by: on June 12, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

SkullphoneTTDBILSkullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas stations. The intent of his early work was to blend in to existing outdoor advertising, signage, and architecture.

In 2010, he debuted a series called Digital Media, an exhibit intended for indoor viewing, a departure from his outdoor work, at a space called Subliminal Projects. The exhibit explored advertising, government, and private enterprise signage, and the spaces on which outdoor media is displayed – making permanent on panels what is reprogrammable and removable in outdoor space. The paintings were done on polished black-painted aluminum panels, used a grid system of red, blue, and green paint (to mimic LED displays) – and were pointillistic, dislocating when approached. They examined the contradictions inherent in outdoor digital signage. (References: Obey, SH, Skullphone, Wikipedia)

SkullphoneHalfMassImages: Theres 30 Digital Billboards in Los Angeles (top) and Half Mass (bottom) from Digital Media ’10.

Skullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas […]MORE

The National Jukebox at the Library of Congress

Posted by: on April 15, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally.Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 10.36.47 AM

The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.

You can find out more about the project here .

This project often involves a painstaking process of analyzing various copies of the same 78rpm recording  and finding just the right one for digitization.

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Here is a slideshow example of the workflow process from beginning to end.

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally. The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary […]MORE

Browse articles from your tablet with BrowZine

Posted by: on March 6, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

BrowZine is a great new service, available from the Phillips Memorial Library, that allows you to browse and read many of the library’s scholarly journals from an iPad or Android tablet.

From the BrowZine website:

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BrowZine delivers thousands of academic journals to your iPad or Android tablet.

BrowZine works by organizing the articles found in Open Access and subscription databases, uniting them into complete journals, then arranging these journals on a common newsstand.  The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines.

Get started using Browzine in three easy steps:

  • From your iPad or Android tablet, go to your app store (Apple App Store, Google Play or Amazon), search for “BrowZine” and download it for free
  • Open BrowZine and select our library from the list
  • Enter your username and library bar code (14 digit code on the back of your PC ID)

Then start browsing and reading your scholarly journals!

Browse your Discipline or favorite Journal title from here:

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Select an Article and Add to your own personal “Bookshelf”:

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It is recommended that you download a free PDF reader App (such as Adobe Reader), so you can save your PDFs and search within the article and edit as needed.

 

Happy browsing!

 

BrowZine is a great new service, available from the Phillips Memorial Library, that allows you to browse and read many of the library’s scholarly journals from an iPad or Android tablet. From the BrowZine website: BrowZine delivers thousands of academic journals to your iPad or Android tablet. BrowZine works by organizing the articles found in […]MORE

Hoopla and borrowing digital media

Posted by: on February 27, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

hoopla

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per individual use but allows for unlimited simultaneous access.

The Kansas City library will limit patrons to 12 Hoopla checkouts a month. Each episode of a TV show is one checkout.

But patrons have access to videos for 72 hours, to music CDs for seven days and to audiobooks for three weeks. After the time is up, the material is automatically deleted, eliminating the possibility of late-return fees.

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per […]MORE

Copyright Myths and Guidelines

Posted by: on January 23, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

 

On January 16th, DPS attended a workshop called, “Copyright Skills as Risk Management Tools: The Librarians Role,” hosted by the Association of Rhode Island Health Science Libraries at CCRI Lincoln.  Most of  the attendees were medical librarians and had important questions regarding the duplication of medical articles requested by doctors and practitioners. Many brought up the Contu Guidelines. Often citing the ambiguity surrounding what is the proper amount of photocopies to make of a certain article, and highlighting the ignorance of copyright knowledge shown by their requester.

Here are a few interesting links presented at the workshop:

downloadCopyright Myths-a publication of the Graphic Arts Guild: This is a great article that helps to debunk some of the myths surrounding the copyright of creative works, such as music, arts, literature, etc.  Often creating scenarios that  people might be confronted with when wanting to use someone else’s piece of music, photograph, etc. for their own purpose and explaining what the actual laws are regarding those scenarios, and not the “assumptions” of what is correct.

download (1)Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in academic and research libraries: The ARL was created in 1932 to address common issues that university and research librarians might be dealt with. The ARL Code of Best Practices is a set of eight situations that are designed to help librarians make informed decisions regarding what materials can be shared and duplicated for educational and research purposes. And it is important because it enables librarians to have a clearer understanding of what items are fair use and what are not. Here are a few FAQs regarding Best Practices.

  On January 16th, DPS attended a workshop called, “Copyright Skills as Risk Management Tools: The Librarians Role,” hosted by the Association of Rhode Island Health Science Libraries at CCRI Lincoln.  Most of  the attendees were medical librarians and had important questions regarding the duplication of medical articles requested by doctors and practitioners. Many brought […]MORE

Archiving Public Broadcasting

Posted by: on November 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The archive will eventually be hosted online and will be freely available to the public.

Read through the Library of Congress’s release here

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald […]MORE

MediaHub Catalog

Posted by: on September 19, 2013   |Comments (3)|Facilities and Tools

As we continue preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing a catalog of the MediaHub’s inventory for patron use.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase the MediaHub’s static and loanable equipment, along with the specifications and features of each item.

The catalog’s design complements the rest of the branding we have developed for the MediaHub. A printed copy will be available in the MediaHub itself, at the Circulation desk, and online. More to come soon!

As we continue preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing a catalog of the MediaHub’s inventory for patron use.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase the MediaHub’s static and loanable equipment, along with the specifications and features of each item. The catalog’s design complements […]MORE

MediaHub Tutorials

Posted by: on September 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video production; basic audio editing; media backup and archiving; online video services; and more! So, here is the first installment on basic video production. In the video, I’ll demonstrate to you how to record video, transfer it to an iMac, edit the footage in iMovie, and share the final project on YouTube. And certainly, if anyone viewing this has questions following the video, you are more than welcome to contact the DPS department at dps@providence.edu.

Stay tuned for other installments!

http://bit.ly/dpstutorials

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video […]MORE

MediaHub Video Update

Posted by: on July 19, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

With its development moving right along, seems that it’s time to provide another installment in our MediaHub video series! In this video, I give another quick tour of the space as it is now, and discuss some of the equipment the MediaHub will offer our patrons. It’s a great experience to see this new collaborative space take shape in the Phillips Memorial Library, and it is our hope that the Providence College community feels similarly. Stay tuned for more updates as the summer moves along!

With its development moving right along, seems that it’s time to provide another installment in our MediaHub video series! In this video, I give another quick tour of the space as it is now, and discuss some of the equipment the MediaHub will offer our patrons. It’s a great experience to see this new collaborative […]MORE

First Video Tour of the MediaHub

Posted by: on June 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Last year, a proposal originated from within our department to develop a library-based multimedia center –  specifically, one that would assist and inspire Providence College faculty, staff, and student scholars in their digital media-inclusive work. After receiving approval from Academic Affairs, the now interdepartmental project – known currently as the MediaHub – has moved forward at a stunning rate. We have received much of the requested equipment and will be setting up the space over the summer, with a soft launch during the Fall 2013 semester. For those interested in seeing this space come to life, here is the first in a video series on the MediaHub, its complement, and our aims in offering this space. Keep posted for future installments!

Last year, a proposal originated from within our department to develop a library-based multimedia center –  specifically, one that would assist and inspire Providence College faculty, staff, and student scholars in their digital media-inclusive work. After receiving approval from Academic Affairs, the now interdepartmental project – known currently as the MediaHub – has moved forward […]MORE