30,000 Getty Museum Images Published in Sleek New Viewer

30,000 Getty Museum Images Published in Sleek New Viewer

Posted by: on June 23, 2017   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The IIIF Mirador viewer showing the Getty Museum’s Van Tromp Going about to Please His Masters (left) and the Yale Center for British Art’s Dort or Dordrecht: The Dort Packet-Boat from Rotterdam Becalmed (right), both by J.M.W. Turner

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images are from the Open Content Program, a collection of images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the pubic domain. All images added to the program in the future will be immediately available in the new viewer.

To browse the images and play with the Mirador viewer, you can go to getty.edu and search the collection – any image with a blue and read IIIF icon underneath it can be viewed in the new viewer (check out Van Gogh’s Irises).

To do a side-by-side comparison:

  1. Select an artwork from the Getty Museum online collection that has a IIIF icon (just below the image and to the right).
  2. Click the IIIF icon to open the Mirador viewer.
  3. Select “Change Layout” at the top right to add one or more slots where you’d like additional artwork images to display.
  4. Select another artwork (with an IIIF icon) that you’d like to compare. Go to the webpage for this object and drag the IIIF icon from that browser tab or window into the new slot you’ve just created. The two images will now appear side by side.

Enjoy!

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images […]MORE

Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection Releases Hundreds of Digitized Images

Posted by: on April 21, 2017   |Comment (1)|Digital Asset Management

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s personal archive. Adler served as director of publicity for Def Jam Records and Rush Artist Management from 1984-1990, where he worked alongside producers Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons, during an era when the label released notable albums by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys, Slick Rick, Run-DMC, EPMD, and De La Soul. Cornell’s curator of rare books and manuscripts, Katherine Reagan, comments that, “Bill’s files are a rich and deep resource for the study of hip-hop’s emergence in the popular press and as a force within the music industry, and they enrich our understanding of hip-hop’s 40-year history.”

The Hip Hop Collection is part of the Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. They received Adler’s archive in 2013, but the newly added pieces represent only 5 percent of the full archive – the rest can be seen in person at the library, for now. The library plans to digitize the rest of Adler’s archive over the next few years, and this recent batch includes over 1700 images. Adler started collecting in the 70s, when there were few resources about hip-hop and the internet did not exist. “But there was a tremendous explosion of writing about hip-hop in real time,” he said. “I’m thrilled to know that the collection is going to be made available to anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection, anywhere in the world.” (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill […]MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web viewing and for use with no copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project, and Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a recent statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site here, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web […]MORE

A Designer’s Treasure Trove: 200,000 Objects from Cooper Hewitt’s Collection Digitized

Posted by: on October 21, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized
Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and image complexity (beta). Each object also has a visual timeline of its life in the collection, from acquisition to digitization.

The site also includes an Experimental section with a few features that you can play with, including “Albers boxes”, an homage to the Bauhaus color-theorist:

“We show Albers boxes when an image can’t be found or when an image has not yet been digitized using the concentric squares as a device to convey some of the information about the object. The outer ring of an Albers box represents the department that an object belongs to; the middle ring represents the period that an object is a part of; the inner ring denotes the type of object […] We are trying to imagine a visual language that a person can become familiar with, over time, and use a way to quickly scan a result set and gain some understanding in the absence of an image of the object itself.”

For developers, they’ve also released an API, as well as the collections metadata and concordances for people dedicated to the public domain, under the Creative Commons CC0 license.

What’s maybe most impressive is that the collection was digitized in 18 months. For a glimpse behind the scenes, check out this video from Cooper Hewitt. And if you like to geek out in the weeds of things like project management and data mapping, you’ll want to check out Cooper Hewitt Labs, where Allison Hale is in the middle of a 4-part series of in-depth posts on the mass digitization, beginning with Workflows and Barcodes and Digital Asset Management.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and […]MORE

Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection

Posted by: on June 2, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Digital Publishing Services recently added the Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection to our dpml.providence.edu site.

Edward P. Doyle, O.P., 1907-1997, was a member of the Providence College faculty from 1941-1954. During a leave of absence for military service Father Doyle served as a World War II U.S. Army Chaplain. As a member of the 104th Infantry Division, Father Doyle was present at the liberation of the concentration camp in Nordhausen, Germany.

The collection includes photographs, text documents, and a single audio file (including a link to the video from that audio file).  The focus of this collection is Father Doyle’s personal photographs from the liberation of the Nordhausen Concentration CampScreen Shot 2016-06-02 at 10.31.08 AM. These images are deeply disturbing, so caution is advised.

Digital Publishing Services recently added the Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection to our dpml.providence.edu site. Edward P. Doyle, O.P., 1907-1997, was a member of the Providence College faculty from 1941-1954. During a leave of absence for military service Father Doyle served as a World War II U.S. Army Chaplain. As a member of the 104th Infantry […]MORE

Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies

Posted by: on March 18, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous issues not only in New England, but also in the United States and internationally”. The discussion centered on “the use of digital media to foster education, research, and outreach within Indigenous communities and studies.” There was a focus on how digital media and tools can help to create connections between people and materials, as well as the importance of relationship-building with Native communities, the ethics surrounding these projects, and project management issues of resource allocation, stewardship, and sustainability.

I was particularly impressed with Tobias Glaza and Paul Grant-Costa’s Yale Indian Papers Project. They focused on the importance of Indigenous communities as stakeholders in the project and collaborating with community members right from the beginning to answer questions like – What’s most important to the community? How do they tell their stories? What information should remain private? How do they want to access and use their digital history? With this approach, they published the New England Indian Papers Series – “a scholarly critical edition of New England Native American primary source materials gathered into one robust virtual collection.” Built on Yale’s Ladybird software and using a Blacklight front-end, the platform is clean and easy-to-use, and includes a document reader, scholarly transcription, and extensive metadata.

An eye-opening takeaway from Alyssa Mt. Pleasant’s presentation on the American Indian Studies (AIS) resources portal that she built at Yale, is the importance of maintaining a project’s stewardship to ensure its longevity. Unfortunately, the AIS portal, which took 3 years to build, wasn’t taken on by anyone else when she left Yale, and consequently, is no longer accessible.

Lisa Brooks from Amherst College gave a fantastic talk on the problem of trying to understand the history of Native spaces when the main existing reference points are colonial maps. She’s worked extensively on creating new historical maps of Indigenous spaces to support her research and is also engaged in the idea of maps as storytelling, often combining her maps with present-day photos of the locations to bring them to life. Her work is included in Amherst’s digital map collection, which was created using Esri’s ArcGIS platform, and is definitely worth checking out.

Another standout was Dana Leibsohn’s project, Vistas, which “seeks to bring an understanding of the visual culture of Spanish America to a broad audience.” Vistas was designed as a non-linear platform, in an effort to encourage multiple pathways between content that would support research in a variety of scholarly disciplines, as well as less formal modes of education and learning. Launched in the late 90’s, Vistas has undergone three major evolutions, from a website hosted by Smith College, to a DVD, and now back to an online version hosted by Fordham University. Dr. Leibsohn’s stewardship of the project over the years has clearly been integral to its longevity, which includes her commitment to tackling the challenges of migrating the platform to keep up with ever-evolving technologies.

There were also a couple of great discussions surrounding endangered Native languages, including a conversation on the power of digital activism to increase online, and particularly social media usage of these languages, as a way of preserving them.

Obviously all of these projects are contributing to content-collection, digital preservation, and scholarship needs, but it was great to hear that so many are focused on supporting Indigenous communities by facilitating access to their histories, preserving them, and ultimately, helping to amplify the voices of these communities.

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous […]MORE

The 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

Photo via Source

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. In May of 2003, the show was canceled without formal announcement, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer, the host at the time, and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. The show made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011, but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013. The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder, identified as Tyler (no last name), and a team of volunteers. The archive does not present each episode in its original recorded form, but rather, lists the videos contained within each episode (and links out to their YouTube versions) and notes hosts and guest artists by episode. Visitors can view the archival listings by year and episode; the site is presented in a tiered layout, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings.

Source – the Cramps on 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (the Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet.

The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, the Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes, but was quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands […]MORE

Photogrammar

Posted by: on February 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Yale University, through a National Endowment for the Humanities grant (NEH), created a beautiful online database called Photogrammar for searching, organizing and visualizing over 170,000 photographs from 1935-1945.  The photographs were created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).  This web-based platform uses various ways to interact with this content, including a map of the United States that can organize the photographs by photographer and where the photographs were taken.  There are Photogrammar Labs, which include a Treemap: “a three-tier classification starting with 12 main subject headings (ex. THE LAND), then 1300 sub-headings (ex. Mountains, Deserts, Foothills, Plains) and then sub-sub headings. 88,000 photographs were assigned classifications,” and a Metadata Platform: “an interactive dashboard showing the relationship between date, county, photographer, and subject in photographs from individual states. The dashboard is still in development, but California is now available.” Coming soon will be a ColorSpace lab, which explores “the 17,000 color photographs based on hue, saturation and lightness.”

A great resource for educators, researchers, students and the public alike.Screen Shot 2016-02-26 at 10.35.26 AM

Yale University, through a National Endowment for the Humanities grant (NEH), created a beautiful online database called Photogrammar for searching, organizing and visualizing over 170,000 photographs from 1935-1945.  The photographs were created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).  This web-based platform uses various ways to interact with this content, including […]MORE

Engaging Users and Remixing Content: New York Public Library’s Digital Collections

Posted by: on February 12, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic views of the U.S., but as I delved deeper, I discovered all of the exciting tools and initiatives that they’ve integrated into the collections to encourage discovery, interaction, sharing, research, and reuse. In particular, I’ve been musing on the fantastic visual browsing tool. Data visualization is still often thought of simply as a graphic, sometimes interactive, representation of statistics and other data, but it also clearly has so much potential as a tool for discovery, by helping users to better understand the scope of the information that they’re searching or exploring.

A thousand skaters, Central Park

Strohmeyer & Wyman, “A thousand skaters, Central Park” (1889), stereoscopic image (via NYPL)

Beyond content visualization, NYPL is championing active user/content engagement with the Digital Collections API, a Remix Residency program and other tools from the creative folks at NYPL Labs, like The Green Book trip planner, which uses “locations extracted from mid-20th century motor guides that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, and other destinations where Black travelers would be welcome.”

For those of us who spend most of our days in the weeds of content management, NYPL’s Digital Collections initiatives are a great reminder to think innovatively about how we can better connect and engage users with digital collections.

For some Friday fun, check out their Stereogranimator and create some 3D images!

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic […]MORE

Rolling Stone Magazine Archive Available Now via Google Play

Posted by: on October 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free. In collaboration with Google Play, the archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and cultural reporting Rolling Stone has generated through time. The archive can be accessed via the Google Play Newsstand app on both iOS and Android devices. Articles by notable writers, including David Fricke, Hunter S. Thompson, and Cameron Crowe, and imagery by Annie Leibovitz and David LaChapelle, are among the content featured. Rolling Stone’s daily news and coverage is available via the app, as well. Alongside the archive, Rolling Stone has introduced a feature on their website called CoverWall, which offers an immersive experience of the publication’s content, including every iconic cover from their 48-year tenure and extensive archival content. They follow in the footsteps of publications like WIRED and the New York Times with this immersive feature, which is noteworthy, as Rolling Stone was slow to enter into digital format. Gus Wenner, Head of Digital of Wenner Media notes that, “This collaboration is as much about our history as it is our future.” Brian Irving, global head of marketing for Google Play adds, “Rolling Stone produced some of the most iconic music and political coverage in America for the past five decades. We’re proud to offer this rich history to people for free, where they can explore and interact with every issue… It’s like a highway of information, revisited.” (Sources: 1, 2)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free. In collaboration with Google Play, the archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and […]MORE