Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks. They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, in addition to other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release […]MORE

Apple & Google Play Announce New Digital Music Streaming Services

Posted by: on June 24, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

1Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th.

Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in an open letter she penned, accusing the company of intending to stiff artists on royalties during the service’s 3-month free streaming trial period. The company has since reconsidered their decision and announced via Apple Senior Vice President Eddy Cue’s Twitter account that they will compensate artists.

Unlike Spotify, neither service allows the user to select songs playing. Google Play Product Manager Elias Roman says he believes many people will not mind this feature, as consumers are after an effortless experience. The company is relying on the behind-the-scenes work of real people, who hand select and curate available playlists; algorithms only come into play after a radio station based on artist or song has been chosen. Apple’s philosophy is similar: Their service claims to offer an “old-fashioned human-curated music playlist for the digital age,” and Apple’s music chief Jimmy Iovine says that algorithms alone “can’t do that emotional task.”

Subscribing to Google Play allows the user to take their playlists offline (as well as manipulate, edit, and rename them) and to listen without interruption. Apple will be offering their service for free for the first 3 months of use and offers individual and family plans once the trial period ends. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th. Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in […]MORE

4DSound & the Future of Library Media Spaces

Posted by: on November 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

4dsys_full_front

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than just stereo; its sixteen vertical speaker columns and complex control system can reproduce sounds in a way unlike anything heard before. Listeners can move through the space, experiencing sounds move around them over time – even sometimes giving the illusion that one is passing between the present and the past.

What does this futuristic system have to do with libraries? Well, if the technology behind it becomes more accessible, we could see a huge shift in experiencing media, especially within libraries of the future. If libraries continue aligning themselves with user media expectations, and even become instructional centers for new media, they may soon host experimental spaces similar to 4DSound – spaces for their community to realize applications yet to be conceived. What’s more, imagine how this might impact music librarianship: the release of new 4d-enchanced audio providing patrons a greater sense of how spatial sound is.

Now, of course, not all advances in media forever change the landscape (quadrophonic sound anyone?), but more generally we in libraries should keep our ear to the ground (excuse the bad wordplay…) to know what may becoming, and what we might be able to bring to our patrons if they haven’t brought it to us first.

While you’re waiting for the future to arrive, please enjoy this video of a recent hack session at 4DSound as inspiration: http://vimeo.com/111579911.

 

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than […]MORE

Free Audio Resources without Copyright Restrictions

Posted by: on September 30, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions that a student’s video project would be more effective with the use of music.  Teachers might find these sites useful to explain copyright issues to students in regards to stealing music, etc. from the web, by showing them what music is actually in the public domain and has a Creative Commons License. Of course, these sites might also Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 11.29.51 AMbenefit teachers for their own projects, as well.

A few great sites for finding free music include:

  • Free Music Archive: This is a great site that hosts a wide range of music genres in a high quality format, free of charge.
  • Sound Bible: This site is an excellent source for various sound effects, such as: dog barks, city sounds, wind sounds, etc.
  • SoundGator: This is also a great site for various sound effects, sound bites and sound clips that are in the public domain with a Creative Commons License.

 

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions […]MORE

New Media Hub Tutorials!

Posted by: on August 20, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard this summer creating new Media Hub video tutorials.  These tutorials emphasize equipment that is available for use in the library, or can be loaned out via the circulation desk.  Three tutorials have been added in the last 2 weeks. They include tips on using GarageBand, Audacity and options for backing up Video Media. Check them out!Screen Shot 2014-08-20 at 9.07.36 AM

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard this summer creating new Media Hub video tutorials.  These tutorials emphasize equipment that is available for use in the library, or can be loaned out via the circulation desk.  Three tutorials have been added in the last 2 weeks. They include tips on using GarageBand, Audacity and options for […]MORE

Club Phil Megamix Video

Posted by: on July 23, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

During this spring and summer break, members of DPS have been experimenting with the MediaHub loanable equipment to get a fuller sense of what possibilities it offers to our patrons. We’re happy to say that they are pretty endless. To demonstrate this and promote the MediaHub, we’ve created a short music video & song featuring the library’s ambient sounds, some of which you might recognize if you’ve spent time in “Club Phil,” as the students call it. So, here for you’re viewing pleasure is “Club Phil Megamix” – a video created exclusively using MediaHub equipment, software and some staff know-how.

The video was recorded using two Panasonic 32GB HC-X900M HD camcorders and two Davis & Sanford Provista 7518FM tripods. All sampled sounds were recorded with a Tascam DR-40 digital handheld recorder and edited in Audacity. The song itself was arranged within GarageBand, using an Akai MPK Mini MIDI controller to program in the melodic elements and additional beats. Finally, the video was edited within Final Cut Pro X. All software and equipment listed is available through the MediaHub. If you are interested to learn more about the MediaHub and the resources we offer through it, please feel free to contact us at dps@providence.edu. We’d be happy to hear from you!

In the meantime, sit back (or dance if you wanna) and enjoy the video!

 

During this spring and summer break, members of DPS have been experimenting with the MediaHub loanable equipment to get a fuller sense of what possibilities it offers to our patrons. We’re happy to say that they are pretty endless. To demonstrate this and promote the MediaHub, we’ve created a short music video & song featuring […]MORE

The National Jukebox at the Library of Congress

Posted by: on April 15, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally.Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 10.36.47 AM

The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.

You can find out more about the project here .

This project often involves a painstaking process of analyzing various copies of the same 78rpm recording  and finding just the right one for digitization.

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Here is a slideshow example of the workflow process from beginning to end.

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally. The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary […]MORE

Archiving Public Broadcasting

Posted by: on November 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The archive will eventually be hosted online and will be freely available to the public.

Read through the Library of Congress’s release here

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald […]MORE

New guide makes citing film and audio easier

Posted by: on April 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

Front-cover-image-Audiovisual Citation GuidelinesDoes the word “citation” make you want to take a snooze?  We don’t blame you.  But if you’ve ever tried to cite something specifically challenging like a YouTube video or a TV commercial, you probably know the frustration that can ensue.  Thankfully, the British Universities Film and Television Council has just released a new set of Audiovisual Citation Guidelines that simplify the process.  The guidelines “address the growing need for a clear, comprehensive and consistent system for the citation of moving image and sound.”  They demonstrate citations for a variety of media including television and radio shows, audio recordings, DVD extras, video and audio clips, trailers, advertisements, amateur and archive material, podcasts, and more.

Here are a couple of examples from the guidelines:

Television Show Accessed Online:
Roddy Doyle’, Writer in Profile [television program clip, online] Pres. David Hanly. RTÉ, Ireland, 10/06/1992, RTÉ 1. 5mins 59secs. http://www.euscreen.eu/play.jsp?id=EUS_74BF381109E04797841DB8C2E30E20EF (accessed 29/09/2012).

Music Track:
‘Romance No.2 in F Major, op. 50’, Chill with Beethoven [music track, CD] Cond. Kenneth Jean, Perf. Slovak Philharmonic orchestra. Naxos, UK, 31/01/2006. 4mins 42secs. [Naxos, 8.556790, 2006].

User-Generated Online Content:
Kittys Meet [user-generated content, online] Creat. BFvsGF. 19/01/2013, 7mins 28secs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34hoyQ7oc2k (accessed 21/01/2013)

For more on this visit the British Universities Film and Television Council’s web page, or download the Audiovisual Citation Guidelines themselves.   You can also view the Phillips Memorial Library’s citation guide for further help with citations in a variety of formats and styles.

Does the word “citation” make you want to take a snooze?  We don’t blame you.  But if you’ve ever tried to cite something specifically challenging like a YouTube video or a TV commercial, you probably know the frustration that can ensue.  Thankfully, the British Universities Film and Television Council has just released a new set […]MORE