New Library Exhibits Now Available

New Library Exhibits Now Available

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services has been busy capturing the library’s most recent exhibitions and adding them to our Digital Commons image galleries. Exhibits include: Sister Saints of the Dominican Order, featuring seven female saints rotated throughout the Spring semester 2017, Albertus Magnus: St. Albert the Great, in honor of a lecture in Providence College’s Aquinas Hall on November 10, 2016, Opening Ceremonies of Providence College, September 18, 1919, featuring photographs from Providence College’s opening, and Providence College Charter Day, created in honor of Providence College celebrating its centennial of the signing of its charter on February 14, 2017.

Albertus Magnus: St. Albert The Great Exhibit Case – Photo 1, Fall 2016

Harkins Hall Dedication Ceremonies, May 25, 1919

Charter Day Exhibit Case – Photo 2, Spring 2017

St. Rosa of Lima – Reproduction, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, ca.1670

Digital Publishing Services has been busy capturing the library’s most recent exhibitions and adding them to our Digital Commons image galleries.... MORE

The Zeutschel overhead scanner is here!

Posted by: on February 10, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services is proud to announce a new addition to the DPS Lab! The Zeutschel OS12002 overhead cradle book scanner. This mighty piece of equipment will allow the DPS Lab to work with a variety of print materials, including delicate/ fragile bound books and documents, to larger books, maps and newspapers.  The overhead scanner houses two highly sensitive and intuitive cameras that scan the documents, one of which is a 3D camera, which through the software PerfectBook, can correct the curvature of a book, document, etc.  This scanner was designed specifically to deal with all of the complicated issues many archivists of print material have had to deal with over the years. Digital Publishing Services is excited have this scanner in our possession so we can move forward with many ambitious projects in the future.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to announce a new addition to the DPS Lab! The Zeutschel OS12002 overhead cradle book... MORE

A Designer’s Treasure Trove: 200,000 Objects from Cooper Hewitt’s Collection Digitized

Posted by: on October 21, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized
Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and image complexity (beta). Each object also has a visual timeline of its life in the collection, from acquisition to digitization.

The site also includes an Experimental section with a few features that you can play with, including “Albers boxes”, an homage to the Bauhaus color-theorist:

“We show Albers boxes when an image can’t be found or when an image has not yet been digitized using the concentric squares as a device to convey some of the information about the object. The outer ring of an Albers box represents the department that an object belongs to; the middle ring represents the period that an object is a part of; the inner ring denotes the type of object […] We are trying to imagine a visual language that a person can become familiar with, over time, and use a way to quickly scan a result set and gain some understanding in the absence of an image of the object itself.”

For developers, they’ve also released an API, as well as the collections metadata and concordances for people dedicated to the public domain, under the Creative Commons CC0 license.

What’s maybe most impressive is that the collection was digitized in 18 months. For a glimpse behind the scenes, check out this video from Cooper Hewitt. And if you like to geek out in the weeds of things like project management and data mapping, you’ll want to check out Cooper Hewitt Labs, where Allison Hale is in the middle of a 4-part series of in-depth posts on the mass digitization, beginning with Workflows and Barcodes and Digital Asset Management.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a... MORE

Redressing Wikipedia’s Diversity Problem

Posted by: on April 22, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

A couple of weeks ago, I participated in Strong Voices, Indigenous Women, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. It was my first foray into Wikipedia editing, and I was a little intimidated. I knew that Wikipedia uses a special markup language that I wasn’t familiar with, and beyond that I was feeling the import of editing such a hugely popular and public information resource. I’m no expert – who am I to edit this content?

But as I chatted with some of the other participants, it was clear that I wasn’t alone. These feelings are not uncommon among new editors, but overcoming them is a key to righting a big problem with Wikipedia – the lack of diversity in Wikipedia’s scope and content that’s been widely attributed to an overwhelmingly homogeneous editor community. Wikipedia’s gender issue has gained particular attention over the past several years, but the problem goes far beyond that. If you’re not very familiar with these issues, Sara Boboltz provides an incisive overview. As she succinctly puts it, Wikipedia editors are “mainly technically inclined, English-speaking, white-collar men living in majority-Christian, developed countries in the Northern hemisphere.”

There are many theories as to why this is, including the burden that the technical knowledge and time required place on potential editors. For example, women in many communities have less free time to devote to work like this. Also, like much of the rest of the male-dominated internet, women are not always welcomed and are much more likely to face harassment in these spaces, which inherently discourages their participation.

Another big part of this problem is Wikipedia’s notability guideline, which says that a topic has to have “received significant coverage in reliable sources that are independent of the subject” in order to be included in Wikipedia. It’s one of the ways that Wikipedia tries to maintain the integrity of its content, but it’s not hard to see the perpetuating effect that this guideline has on the lack of coverage of historically disenfranchised groups of people in our documented history.

If Wikipedia’s aim is to compile “the sum of all human knowledge”, everyone should be represented in the editor community. And as Wikipedia continues to grow as one of the most popular websites in the world, and its content becomes increasingly visible and authoritative, this is increasingly crucial. For example, Google now pulls Wikipedia content into it’s biographical sidebar making the information even more prominent.

The good news is that the Wikimedia Foundation is keenly aware of this problem and dedicating resources toward correcting it. For example, in 2012 they released VisualEditor, a more user-friendly editing interface and they’ve also allocated funds to initiatives that are building content on under-represented communities and subjects, like Wikipedia edit-a-thons.

While events like edit-a-thons are very successful at introducing Wikipedia editing and creating a safe space for first-timers to learn, a problem this entrenched and complex will require long-term engagement from this new wave of editors. We all have a right, and I might also argue, a responsibility, to participate in the documentation of our collective knowledge and history, and for all its shortcomings, Wikipedia provides an amazing space for us to do just that. In the words of co-founder, Jimmy Wales, “See that link up there? ‘edit this page’. Go for it, it’s a wiki.”

Want to try your hand at editing Wikipedia? Check out this beginner’s guide. Want to organize an edit-a-thon at your institution? This how-to is a great place to start.

A couple of weeks ago, I participated in Strong Voices, Indigenous Women, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Schlesinger Library on... MORE

Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist (Open Position)

Posted by: on November 3, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

PML_fron_Fall_2015

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development of digital information content and presentation tools and services.

You can review the complete position description, essential duties, position requirement and apply here.

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to... MORE

Cultural Institutions Embrace Crowdsourcing

Posted by: on October 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

A recent post on the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Blog, The Signal by Mike Ashenfelder takes a look at crowdsourcing’s value to library and cultural heritage digital projects. Citizen volunteers can participate in activities such as analyzing images, creating tags and metadata, subtitling videos, transcribing documents, correcting OCR’d (optical character recognition) text and more. Ashenfelder provides several international examples of digital projects that leverage the power of citizen volunteer participation.

For the complete post click here.

A recent post on the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Blog, The Signal by Mike Ashenfelder takes a look at... MORE

‘Oligarchy’ of publishers

Posted by: on July 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Recently CBC News provided a report on a study published in PLoS One about the academic publishing industry.

Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein and Philippe Mongeon, co-authors of the study found that research publishing houses have typical profit margins of nearly 40%, whereas traditional book and magazine publishers are struggling to stay afloat. Additionally, the study authors found that the five largest, for-profit academic publishers now publish 53% of scientific papers in the natural and medical sciences; and in the social sciences, the top five publishers publish 70% of papers.

Recently CBC News provided a report on a study published in PLoS One about the academic publishing industry. Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein... MORE

The Peeps are Back!!

Posted by: on March 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Spring is almost upon us, which can mean only one thing, the Peeps are back at Phillips Memorial Library!  They have been causing quite a stir, getting into lots of trouble! Geese and peepsTake a gander at what they have been up to on the PeepsinTheLibrary Twitter page!

Spring is almost upon us, which can mean only one thing, the Peeps are back at Phillips Memorial Library!  They... MORE

New GA in Special Collections/DPS Lab!

Posted by: on July 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

The DPS Lab and Special Collections would like to take this moment to welcome our new GA (Graduate Assistant), Andrew Lavoie, to the library!lavoiephoto[1]

Andrew graduated in May 2014 from PC with a B.A. in History and a minor in Classics.  He is from Manchester, NH and is attending PC’s Graduate Program to get a Masters in American History with a focus on Early Colonial America.  As a PC undergrad, Andrew traveled to Greece with Dr. Thomas Strasser as a member of his archaeological dig team.  He will be a G.A. in Special Collections and DPS Lab for the next 2 years as he works towards his Masters.  After he graduates, he plans on either continuing his education or teaching at the high school level.

The DPS Lab and Special Collections are excited to have him as part of our team!

The DPS Lab and Special Collections would like to take this moment to welcome our new GA (Graduate Assistant), Andrew... MORE

Welcome to Digital Publishing @ Providence College!

Posted by: on March 5, 2013   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing @ Providence College provides information and updates for the Providence College community about developments in scholarly communication, including posts about copyright, policy debates, protocols, platforms and examples of local, national and international innovations in scholarly dissemination and discourse practices. Digital Publishing @ Providence College is managed by staff of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons.

Digital Publishing @ Providence College provides information and updates for the Providence College community about developments in scholarly communication, including... MORE