DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

Posted by: on May 5, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the library’s Special Collections and Archives.

Building off the work done on the Theology Collections Portal, Doctors Illuzzi and Urbano worked to create a digital exhibit, Sons of Providence, through which they could share the archival materials and photographs that had informed their research along with multimedia elements including a documentary made in collaboration with Film Studies Minor Joseph Aiello ’17, an interactive map, and a wealth of photographs and primary documents. The Digital Publishing Services Coordinator supported the faculty as they created the exhibit using the Scalar platform. Two library-owned iPad kiosks configured to present the digital exhibit were installed as part of a physical exhibit in Harkins Hall during the spring of 2017. DPS staff photographed the exhibit and the images are available at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/exhibits_sons_providence/ . Another installation of the exhibit and kiosks will take place in the library in the coming year.

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the […]MORE

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

While the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in […]MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above. It was fun […]MORE

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Library of Congress's new homepage

The Library of Congress’s new homepage

On Tuesday November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled a redesign of their homepage, which comes as part of a larger redesign of the site currently in the works. On October 27th, the Library’s blog The Signal published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the LOC, wherein she discussed user experience and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative led by Smith and one of its greatest challenges, she says, is that the LOC started sharing their vast amount of content early on the web, using older technologies, and substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions must be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata must be assigned to records. Once the foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to read the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled a redesign of their homepage, which comes as part of a larger redesign of the site currently in the works. On October 27th, the Library’s blog The Signal published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the LOC, […]MORE

Collections as Data 2016 Conference

Posted by: on September 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

CollectionsAsData 1A
On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a Collections as Data conference in Washington, D.C. The conference’s website provided the following description for the event:

“The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.”

Participants had the option of attending the conference in-person or virtually, as the event was live-streamed on the LOC’s YouTube channel. Members of the Digital Publishing Services team attended sessions virtually throughout the day. Sessions were open to the public and organizers asked that attendees use the hashtag #AsData in their tagging. A video recording of the conference has been archived on the LOC’s YouTube channel. For more information about the event, please visit the conference’s website. (Source)

On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a Collections as Data conference in Washington, D.C. The conference’s website provided the following description for the event: “The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The […]MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the […]MORE

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks. They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, in addition to other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release […]MORE

The MTV 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

120 Minutes 1995-98 logo

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was a 2-hour after hours alternative music block that featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. The show was canceled without formal announcement in May 2003, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer (the host at the time) and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. 120 Minutes made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011 but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013.

The 120 Minutes archive

The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder (identified as Tyler) and a team of volunteers. It doesn’t present each episode in its originally recorded form; it instead lists guest artists, hosts, and videos by episode and links out to the YouTube versions of all videos featured. Visitors can view listings by year or episode. The site is presented in tiered form, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings and details.

The Cramps in 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (The Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet. The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes but quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was a 2-hour after hours alternative music block that featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. […]MORE

DPS Welcomes Elizabeth Schneider

Posted by: on January 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a User Relations Manager and Technical Services Lead.  Elizabeth brings a wealth of knowledge about digital asset management systems and metadata to the department.  In her new role as Digital Publishing Services Specialist Elizabeth will work on digitization projects, assist in the management of our Digital Commons and Islandora repositories, collaborate with faculty in the creation of SelectedWorks pages, and contribute to a variety of cross-library initiatives.  Welcome Elizabeth!

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a […]MORE

Guest Post: Russell Franks on Infrared Photography

Posted by: on November 4, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College. 

PC_infrared_0502Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us with vital subtle clues and information about the world around us.

But there is another part of the light spectrum – infrared light – that we cannot see. We know it exists; scientists quantified it over one hundred years ago, but we can’t perceive it naturally without the aid of specialized recording equipment, such as a camera.

Infrared light lies between the visible and microwave portions (think microwave oven) of the electromagnetic spectrum. It also has a range of wavelengths, just like visible light has wavelengths that reflect the colors red to violet. The “near” infrared light spectrum, which is closest to the color red, is just beyond what we naturally see and “far” infrared is closest to the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

PC_infrared_0183My curiosity in infrared photography began during my analog camera days. In the pre-digital world infrared imaging required infrared sensitive film, an infrared filter for the camera lens, and a complicated focusing method since light in the infrared range focuses differently than the visible light we normally see.

However, my fascination with infrared imagery deepened upon realizing infrared photography extended the perception of my reality and my understanding in that there is more to see than what we actually see. The sense of other worldliness that infrared imagery suggests stretches the logic of my imagination in how I see mankind and nature interact with each other. This “through the lens” altered perception has even invaded my daily life. Every day I am confronted with various scenes that beg to be photographed in infrared to magically reveal the unseen play of light. This is just one part of nature I seek to explore through the medium of the lens.

As an artist, the infrared journey has been filled with surprise, frustration, and immense satisfaction, but more importantly this unveiling of the unseen natural world to the naked eye has permanently changed how I visually perceive my surroundings.

In the days of analog photography, infrared imagery was usually thought of as a specialized art form reserved for professionals. However, with the advent of digital photography, infrared imaging has become much easier and less expensive in the long run – not to mention a lot more FUN! True, having your digital camera converted for a few hundred dollars to “see” the infrared spectrum might be considered extravagant, but well worth it if you want to view the world – literally – in a different light.

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College.  Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us […]MORE

Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist (Open Position)

Posted by: on November 3, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

PML_fron_Fall_2015

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development of digital information content and presentation tools and services.

You can review the complete position description, essential duties, position requirement and apply here.

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development […]MORE

Rolling Stone Magazine Archive Available Now via Google Play

Posted by: on October 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
via Source

Rolling Stone’s digital archive (source)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free, in collaboration with Google Play. The archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and cultural reporting Rolling Stone has generated over time. The archive can be accessed via the Google Play Newsstand app on both iOS and Android devices. Articles by notable writers, including David Fricke, Hunter S. Thompson, and Cameron Crowe, and imagery by Annie Leibovitz and David LaChapelle, are among the content featured. Rolling Stone’s daily news and coverage is available via the app, as well.

Alongside the archive, Rolling Stone has introduced a feature on their website called CoverWall, which offers an immersive experience of the publication’s content, including every iconic cover from their 48-year tenure and extensive archival content. They follow in the footsteps of publications like WIRED and the New York Times with this immersive feature, which is noteworthy, as Rolling Stone was slow to enter into digital format. Gus Wenner, Head of Digital of Wenner Media notes that, “This collaboration is as much about our history as it is our future.” Brian Irving, global head of marketing for Google Play, adds, “Rolling Stone produced some of the most iconic music and political coverage in America for the past five decades. We’re proud to offer this rich history to people for free, where they can explore and interact with every issue… It’s like a highway of information, revisited.” (Sources: 1, 2)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free, in collaboration with Google Play. The archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and […]MORE

The Happy Birthday song is now, finally, public domain

Posted by: on September 26, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A legal battle spanning two world wars, 8 track to mp3 players is finally over. Warner/Chappel’s lucrative ($2 million a year!) copyright ownership claim is struck down in court.

Happy Birthday

Warner/Chappel will no longer be able to charge royalties to filmmakers, artists, and many other for profit ventures for using the classic Happy Birthday song. Judge King ruled that the original copyright of the song covered only the piano arrangement and not the entirety of the song. This ends a decades long legal battle between Warner/Chappel and independent filmmakers and artists.

Until now, Warner has asked for royalties from anyone who wanted to sing or play “Happy Birthday to You” — with the lyrics — as part of a profit-making enterprise. Royalties were most often collected from stage productions, television shows, movies or greeting cards. But even those who wanted to sing the song publicly as part of a business, say a restaurant owner giving out free birthday cake to patrons, technically had to pay to use the song, prompting creative renditions at chain eateries trying to avoid paying royalties.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-happy-birthday-song-lawsuit-decision-20150922-story.html

 

A legal battle spanning two world wars, 8 track to mp3 players is finally over. Warner/Chappel’s lucrative ($2 million a year!) copyright ownership claim is struck down in court. Warner/Chappel will no longer be able to charge royalties to filmmakers, artists, and many other for profit ventures for using the classic Happy Birthday song. Judge […]MORE

Jerry Lewis Archive to be Preserved by Library of Congress

Posted by: on September 17, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Jerry Lewis (source)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; home movies of Lewis at work and play; fully scripted motion pictures produced by Lewis at home; and rare footage of Martin and Lewis doing their nightclub act, among other material.

Lewis himself will be present to perform at the opening event, “An Evening with Jerry Lewis”, on October 9th at Culpeper’s State Theatre. The Packard Campus houses collections for other comedians as well, including Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, and Sid Caesar. For more about the Library of Congress’s collections, please visit loc.gov. (Sources: 1, 2)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; […]MORE

Freshmen: Then and Now Exhibit

Posted by: on September 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Welcome, Class of 2019! The library’s Special and Archival Collections department has thoughtfully curated an exhibit dedicated entirely to PC freshmen over the years.  The exhibit is called: Freshmen: Then and Now.  You can visit the physical exhibit, located in the glass cases next to ‘The Pit.” But you can also conveniently browse the online exhibit as well.  The exhibit is included as part of our Digital Commons Exhibits and Events page.

Enjoy browsing what the freshmen experience has been like over the years!

18

Welcome, Class of 2019! The library’s Special and Archival Collections department has thoughtfully curated an exhibit dedicated entirely to PC freshmen over the years.  The exhibit is called: Freshmen: Then and Now.  You can visit the physical exhibit, located in the glass cases next to ‘The Pit.” But you can also conveniently browse the online exhibit […]MORE

Welcome Fall 2015!

Posted by: on September 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Greetings, and welcome (or welcome back) to campus.  We are very glad to see you!  Below you’ll find a couple of quick pointers to help you start the semester off smoothly.

original photo from flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dLJU1F

original photo from flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dLJU1F

Get Help Fast

Need a book?  Have a research question?  Need access to an article?  You can reach a librarian quickly via:

text: 401-484-7004

email: askalibrarian@lists.providence.edu

phone: 401-865-1993

DPS Can Help

DPS stands for Digital Publishing Services.  We are a department within the library that can assist you with the following:

  • scanning and digitization
  • multimedia creation (including software tutorials and/or access to hardware such as video cameras, microphones, etc.)
  • information about Digital Commons, PC’s institutional repository
  • consultation around how to integrate digital humanities methodologies into your research

For help with any of the above leave a comment below or contact us at dps@providence.edu.  Wishing you a great semester!

Greetings, and welcome (or welcome back) to campus.  We are very glad to see you!  Below you’ll find a couple of quick pointers to help you start the semester off smoothly. Get Help Fast Need a book?  Have a research question?  Need access to an article?  You can reach a librarian quickly via: text: 401-484-7004 […]MORE

NYPL Now Loaning WiFi Hotspots

Posted by: on August 6, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Tony Marx, director of the New York Public Library, has recently secured funding for a project that will allow the NYPL to offer it’s patrons free Wi-Fi hotstpot devices. Marx has been known for his vision of a more accessible library.

We’re human beings. We’re social animals. Even if you don’t need to come to the library to read a book, people come to the library to be together and to be in inspiring spaces

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/arianna-huffington-tony-marx-nypl_559aca67e4b0759e2b50e20b

Learn more about the Library HotSpot here: http://hotspot.nypl.org/

If you’d like to learn more about Tony Marx, and the NYPL, check out his talk with Arianna Huffington at the Aspen Ideas Festival.

Tony Marx, director of the New York Public Library, has recently secured funding for a project that will allow the NYPL to offer it’s patrons free Wi-Fi hotstpot devices. Marx has been known for his vision of a more accessible library. We’re human beings. We’re social animals. Even if you don’t need to come to […]MORE

Andy Warhol Became First Modern Digital Artist 30 Years Ago this July

Posted by: on July 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

warhol-debbie-harryAccording to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a portrait of Debbie Harry, of the band Blondie, and essentially created a new form of modern art. According to Burmon, Warhol’s interest in computer graphics could be traced back to an introduction to them (alongside Keith Haring) by Steve Jobs at Sean Lennon’s ninth birthday party, which happened less than a year before the Amiga 1000 presentation. To learn more about Warhol’s pursuit of digital art, please visit the article here.

According to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a […]MORE

DC comics coming to Hoopla

Posted by: on July 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured fashion, waiting to gauge how well they sell in more traditional markets before hosting them in the library.

Hoopla users will be able to borrow 25 of DC Entertainment’s top titles including Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Watchmen, Superman: Earth One, V for Vendetta, Final Crisis and Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Blood. Whether you’re a hardcore comic fan or just want to catch up on some of the best stories DC has ever published, it’s a pretty nice list of graphic novels.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/25/hoopla-dc-comics/

 

Learn more about Hoopla

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured […]MORE

Apple & Google Play Announce New Digital Music Streaming Services

Posted by: on June 24, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

1Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th.

Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in an open letter she penned, accusing the company of intending to stiff artists on royalties during the service’s 3-month free streaming trial period. The company has since reconsidered their decision and announced via Apple Senior Vice President Eddy Cue’s Twitter account that they will compensate artists.

Unlike Spotify, neither service allows the user to select songs playing. Google Play Product Manager Elias Roman says he believes many people will not mind this feature, as consumers are after an effortless experience. The company is relying on the behind-the-scenes work of real people, who hand select and curate available playlists; algorithms only come into play after a radio station based on artist or song has been chosen. Apple’s philosophy is similar: Their service claims to offer an “old-fashioned human-curated music playlist for the digital age,” and Apple’s music chief Jimmy Iovine says that algorithms alone “can’t do that emotional task.”

Subscribing to Google Play allows the user to take their playlists offline (as well as manipulate, edit, and rename them) and to listen without interruption. Apple will be offering their service for free for the first 3 months of use and offers individual and family plans once the trial period ends. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th. Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in […]MORE

Freegal Service Allows Free Digital Access to Music

Posted by: on May 18, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Untitled-4The Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries announced this week that they will now offer access to a service called Freegal. Freegal, a music service offered through subscribing libraries’ websites, provides free access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. Freegal’s service is provided through Library Ideas, LLC, a company based in Vienna, VA that stocks libraries with digital content and offers services like Freading eBook Service and Rocket Languages, in addition to Freegal.

All that is required to access Freegal is a valid library card with a subscribing library. Free Freegal mobile apps for Apple and Android devices are available through the Apple app store and GooglePlay for cardholders of subscribing libraries. There are limits on number of downloads allowed weekly and stream time daily. While mp3 downloads are restricted by weekly amount, they never expire and can be saved to mobile devices indefinitely. Freegal offers a similarly designed movie service that allows patrons of subscribing libraries access to thousands of movies and shows. For more on the Lubbock and Peoria public libraries’ use of Freegal, please see these articles: Lubbock Freegal, Peoria Freegal.

The Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries announced this week that they will now offer access to a service called Freegal. Freegal, a music service offered through subscribing libraries’ websites, provides free access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. Freegal’s service […]MORE

Spotlight: Dorr Rebellion Site Constitutions

Posted by: on April 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

2Featured on the Dorr Rebellion site is a Constitutions module. The section features links to pdfs of The People’s Constitution and Law & Order Constitution, and a side-by-side comparison of the two. The pdfs are available for download and readable online as searchable documents or available for examination in a page viewer, which has automatic and manual page turning options. Each constitution’s page has on it a detailed summary of information relevant to it written by Dr. Patrick T. Conley, constitutional historian and co-author of The Rhode Island State Constitution: A Reference Guide (2010). An article-by-article comparison is also available on the main Constitutions page. You can view this section of the site here.

Featured on the Dorr Rebellion site is a Constitutions module. The section features links to pdfs of The People’s Constitution and Law & Order Constitution, and a side-by-side comparison of the two. The pdfs are available for download and readable online as searchable documents or available for examination in a page viewer, which has automatic and manual […]MORE

ACRL DigiCamp 2015

Posted by: on March 27, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

digicamp

On Friday, March 13th, ACRL’s Information Technology Interest Group hosted its annual DigiCamp unconference at Simmons College. For those new to the concept, an unconference is an event similar in structure to a conference (i.e. track-based schedule), but it differs in that each session is intended to be an open dialog about a given subject amongst its participants. Aside from a facilitator or two providing guidance to the discussion, it can flow in any number of relevant directions. ITIG first organized DigiCamp back in 2010 as a means to gather people in academic libraries to discuss how they were using technology and what technology might be of interest in the future. Following that path, the 2015 DigiCamp had twelve tracks, each dedicated to a specific aspect of using technology in libraries.

Each session was approximately an hour long and participants were free to move between the different tracks if the subject wasn’t of interest to them. The first block offered conversations on open access and institutional repositories, marketing in libraries, discovery services, and assessment. The second offered sessions on LibGuides, mobile technologies, altmetrics, and open education resources. And finally, the third closed out the day with discussions on eBooks, digital preservation, makerspaces, and responsive web design.

There are often many takeaways from DigiCamp, as you get to here the details of how people are approaching these issues. All facilitators were requested to take notes on the session and then capture images of them for later reference. The session I co-facilitated on makerspaces generated over 9 pages of notes, which indicates that it was a pretty lively discussion.

To find out more about DigiCamp 2015, and to access the session notes, please check out the Google site located below. And hope to see you at DigiCamp next year!

https://sites.google.com/site/digicamp2015/home

On Friday, March 13th, ACRL’s Information Technology Interest Group hosted its annual DigiCamp unconference at Simmons College. For those new to the concept, an unconference is an event similar in structure to a conference (i.e. track-based schedule), but it differs in that each session is intended to be an open dialog about a given subject […]MORE

Digitally Animated Ugly Christmas Sweater

Posted by: on December 18, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party.

Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.

 

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party. Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.  MORE

Need a diversion during finals? Try the Inspirograph

Posted by: on December 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Feeling a little overwhelmed this week?  We hear you!  Here’s a suggestion for a little diversion: the Inspirograph, a digital version of the classic, analog, Spirograph toy.

inspiro 2

To use the Inspirograph, simply select either a fixed or rotating gauge in any of the sizes available and start making your spirals.  You can select different pen and background colors using the preset selections or choosing your own.  Here’s a look at my creation:

inspiro

Once you’ve completed a design, you can download it or submit it to a gallery full of designs by other users.  Trust me, this is addictive.

I discovered the Inspirograph via the Co.Design blog. Try it our yourself!

 

Feeling a little overwhelmed this week?  We hear you!  Here’s a suggestion for a little diversion: the Inspirograph, a digital version of the classic, analog, Spirograph toy. To use the Inspirograph, simply select either a fixed or rotating gauge in any of the sizes available and start making your spirals.  You can select different pen […]MORE

Data Viz Exploration: the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards

Posted by: on October 31, 2014   |Comment (1)|Spotlights

Here in DPS we are just starting to get our feet wet in the world of data visualization.  Is this a new topic for you too?  Well, to help you gain an understanding of the power of data visualization, we suggest checking out the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards.  Voting is taking place now for the 2014 Awards, but you can view the list of finalists here.

Here are a couple of my personal favorites from the short list:

 Data Visualizationaftermarket eduction copy:

Aftermarket Education by Beutler Ink

For its annual Education Issue, Popular Science magazine explored the huge uptick in massive open online courses (MOOCs) and tapped us for our data visualization expertise to bring the numbers to life. Using a series of clusters to represent available MOOCs, we showed the number of courses available through 2014 at nine of the largest MOOC providers. Through light-hearted callouts, we suggest possible courses of study a casual student might pursue. The infographic appeared in the September 2013 issue of the print edition.

Infographicceative routines copy:

Creative Routines by RJ Andrews

How do creatives – composers, painters, writers, scientists, philosophers – find the time to produce their opus? Mason Currey investigated the rigid Daily Rituals that hundreds of creatives practiced in order to carve out time, every day, to work their craft. Some kept to the same disciplined regimen for decades while others locked in patterns only while working on specific works. “Creative Routines” visualizes a selection of the routines Currey researched.

 

 

 

Interactivewomen in science copy:

Women in Science by FF Function

An interactive tool built for the Unesco Institute for Statistics as part of the International Women’s Day and centered on the theme “Equality for women is progress for all” helps visualize the gender gaps in the pipeline leading to a career in research.

There is much more to explore at the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards site.  Enjoy!

Here in DPS we are just starting to get our feet wet in the world of data visualization.  Is this a new topic for you too?  Well, to help you gain an understanding of the power of data visualization, we suggest checking out the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards.  Voting is taking place now for […]MORE

Inti Celebrates 40 Years

Posted by: on October 16, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

17This Fall, the Inti journal celebrates 40 years of publication. Inti was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time, for 40 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish literature, creative writing by Latin and Spanish authors, and works of art by visual artists. Phillips Memorial Library will host an exhibit highlighting Inti’s tenure during the month of October – stop by to view and check out the virtual exhibit here!

This Fall, the Inti journal celebrates 40 years of publication. Inti was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time, for 40 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish […]MORE

Skullphone: Digital Media

Posted by: on June 12, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

SkullphoneTTDBILSkullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas stations. The intent of his early work was to blend in to existing outdoor advertising, signage, and architecture.

In 2010, he debuted a series called Digital Media, an exhibit intended for indoor viewing, a departure from his outdoor work, at a space called Subliminal Projects. The exhibit explored advertising, government, and private enterprise signage, and the spaces on which outdoor media is displayed – making permanent on panels what is reprogrammable and removable in outdoor space. The paintings were done on polished black-painted aluminum panels, used a grid system of red, blue, and green paint (to mimic LED displays) – and were pointillistic, dislocating when approached. They examined the contradictions inherent in outdoor digital signage. (References: Obey, SH, Skullphone, Wikipedia)

SkullphoneHalfMassImages: Theres 30 Digital Billboards in Los Angeles (top) and Half Mass (bottom) from Digital Media ’10.

Skullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas […]MORE

INTI’s Artists: Mario Toral

Posted by: on May 1, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Each issue of the Inti journal we digitize features artwork by well-known artists. One of the best known is Mario Toral.

Mario Toral Muñoz is a Chilean-born painter and photographer, who at 16 relocated to Argentina before studying as a fine art student in Uruguay and France. He settled in New York from 1973-92, where he established himself professionally by regularly participating in exhibitions. One of his most famous works, a mural entitled Visual Memory of a Nation, is located in the Santiago Metro station at the Universidad de Chile. The massive piece took him 3 years to complete, from 1996-99.

Universidad_de_Chile_8Visual Memory of a Nation, by Mario Toral, Santiago Metro station

You can see Mario Toral’s work, as well as work from other artists, in the pages of Inti. Visit Digital Publishing Services’ Inti issue archive, Inti Gallery, and Inti website to see past issues and find out about new publications.

Each issue of the Inti journal we digitize features artwork by well-known artists. One of the best known is Mario Toral. Mario Toral Muñoz is a Chilean-born painter and photographer, who at 16 relocated to Argentina before studying as a fine art student in Uruguay and France. He settled in New York from 1973-92, where […]MORE

Party & Society, Dr. Cedric de Leon

Posted by: on March 26, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Party & Society Book Cover

Providence College’s Dr. Cedric de Leon from the Department of Sociology has published his first book, Party & Society, with Polity Press. Dr. de Leon examines the ways in which social scientists and other observers have imagined the relationship between parties and society, offering a succinct and lively analysis that outlines the key thinking in the field. Several weeks ago Chris Machado, Providence College’s Academic Communications Director, spoke with Dr. de Leon to discuss Party & Society–video interview here.

A book launch celebration [see poster below] sponsored by Sociology, Global Studies, and the Office of Institutional Diversity will be held on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. The afternoon launch and celebration will begin at 3:30pm with an author-meets-critics session in Siena 200 followed by a reception at 5:00pm in the Department of Sociology, Howley Hall. To rsvp please email cdeleon@providence.edu.

Party & Society Book LaunchPoster

Providence College’s Dr. Cedric de Leon from the Department of Sociology has published his first book, Party & Society, with Polity Press. Dr. de Leon examines the ways in which social scientists and other observers have imagined the relationship between parties and society, offering a succinct and lively analysis that outlines the key thinking in the field. […]MORE

Hoopla and borrowing digital media

Posted by: on February 27, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

hoopla

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per individual use but allows for unlimited simultaneous access.

The Kansas City library will limit patrons to 12 Hoopla checkouts a month. Each episode of a TV show is one checkout.

But patrons have access to videos for 72 hours, to music CDs for seven days and to audiobooks for three weeks. After the time is up, the material is automatically deleted, eliminating the possibility of late-return fees.

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per […]MORE

Open Access Button recently launched

Posted by: on November 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser.

“People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it slows innovation, kills curiosity and harms patients. This is an indictment of the current system. Open Access has given us the solution to this problem by allowing everyone to read and re-use research. We created the Open Access Button to track the impact of paywalls and help you get access to the research you need. By using the button you’ll help show the impact of this problem, drive awareness of the issue, and help change the system. Furthermore, the Open Access Button has several ways of helping you get access to the research you need right now.”

Be sure to check out the map to see the breakdown of paywalls across the globe. Hint: zooming in will afford a more granular look at the paywall statistics.

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser. “People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it […]MORE

Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive

Posted by: on November 19, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A team from Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Net­works  (a research center for Dig­ital Human­i­ties and Com­pu­ta­tional Social Sci­ence) has devel­op­ed an extensive, crowd-sourced, dig­ital archive fea­turing sto­ries, photos, videos, oral his­to­ries, social media, and other mate­rials related to the Boston Marathon bomb­ings that took place on April 15, 2013.  The archive “will allow the public to explore not only what happened during the event, but also how the event was experienced by Bostonians, visitors to the city, and those many members of the Boston diaspora who were far away but deeply engaged in the unfolding events. The archive will serve as a long-term memorial, preserving these records for students and researchers, providing future historians with invaluable, local windows into an important national event.”

Explore the Our Marathon site or learn more on Twitter @OurMarathon

Screen Shot 2013-11-19 at 12.11.20 PM

A team from Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Net­works  (a research center for Dig­ital Human­i­ties and Com­pu­ta­tional Social Sci­ence) has devel­op­ed an extensive, crowd-sourced, dig­ital archive fea­turing sto­ries, photos, videos, oral his­to­ries, social media, and other mate­rials related to the Boston Marathon bomb­ings that took place on April 15, 2013.  The archive “will […]MORE

Archiving Public Broadcasting

Posted by: on November 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The archive will eventually be hosted online and will be freely available to the public.

Read through the Library of Congress’s release here

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald […]MORE

The Bookless Library

Posted by: on October 24, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Bexar Library

Just recently, the nations first completely digital, e-reader only library opened its doors. While the physical library is ostensibly unnecessary, (the entire collection can be viewed from a home computer or other capable device) the space remains important to the community as many in the Bexar area do not have access to computers and/or broadband internet.

“Our digital library is stored in the cloud, so you don’t have to come in to get a book. But we’re a traditional library in that the building itself is an important community space.” –  Laura Cole, BiblioTech’s special projects coordinator

The idea originated with Nelson Wolff, a Bexar County Judge, who had felt that libraries were lagging behind current technologies. Read more about Wolff and Bexar County Digital Library.

Check out the Bexar County Digital Library

 

Update:

NBC has done a story about the library, here is the video!

Just recently, the nations first completely digital, e-reader only library opened its doors. While the physical library is ostensibly unnecessary, (the entire collection can be viewed from a home computer or other capable device) the space remains important to the community as many in the Bexar area do not have access to computers and/or broadband […]MORE

Library Spaces

Posted by: on September 5, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Hello all,

This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the pipeline like tying in space requesting, video tours, and possibly an interactive floor plan. The site is still in very early development, we’re hoping we can get something up and published before the semester is over, maybe even before October hits. Hopefully!

 

If you’re interested in some of the inspiration behind our Library Spaces site, check out some of our favorites below:

http://libraries.mit.edu/study/ – MIT’s setup is super clean and functional, they’ve managed to fit all of the important information about a space into a neat little block of content. I like the use of icons here as well.

http://www.library.ucsf.edu/services/computing – UCSF breaks down their spaces by function, which I think is super handy for students who need to get something done in the library but might not know exactly where to go to do it.

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/learningspaces – NCSU has a great multimedia component complementing their spaces page(s). Nice pictures and a slick gallery highlight the spaces nicely.

Hello all, This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the […]MORE

Studio Art Majors: Student Work Collection

Posted by: on August 28, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Department of Art and Art History and the Phillips Memorial Library have been collaborating on an exciting project this summer—the creation of a digital collection representing Providence College Art Studio students’ work, presented at student senior shows. Each year, images from senior shows in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture will be added to the evolving collection, reflecting a diversity of intellectual, creative expression and of formats from Providence College Art Studio students. To view the collection, visit Studio Art Majors: Student Work.

StudioArtistsPC

The Department of Art and Art History and the Phillips Memorial Library have been collaborating on an exciting project this summer—the creation of a digital collection representing Providence College Art Studio students’ work, presented at student senior shows. Each year, images from senior shows in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture will be […]MORE

3D printing starting to catch on in libraries

Posted by: on August 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

3d printer in action

Libraries are beginning to offer, for a fee and a bit of training, access to 3d printing. The LA Times has recently published an article about 3d printing and some of the libraries that are beginning to venture into offering 3d printing services. Check out the article here: http://lat.ms/1exwWnV

One of the pioneer libraries offering 3d printing is the Cleveland Public Library, check out their 3d printer info page here: http://bit.ly/1cOg4wE

 

 

Libraries are beginning to offer, for a fee and a bit of training, access to 3d printing. The LA Times has recently published an article about 3d printing and some of the libraries that are beginning to venture into offering 3d printing services. Check out the article here: http://lat.ms/1exwWnV One of the pioneer libraries offering […]MORE

The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion by Dr. Erik Chaput

Posted by: on August 6, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03 alum and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) has published, The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion.” Through his engaging narrative, Dr. Chaput shows the Dorr Rebellion as a critical moment of American history leading up to the Civil War. The rebellion was the only revolutionary republican movement in the antebellum period that claimed the people’s sovereignty as the basis for the right to alter or abolish a form of government.

You can read a complete summary of The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion” and reviews at the University Press of Kansas Website, here.

chapeo

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03 alum and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) has published, The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion.” Through his engaging narrative, Dr. Chaput shows the Dorr Rebellion as a critical moment of American history leading up to the Civil War. The rebellion was […]MORE

Check out Shelf.io

Posted by: on July 11, 2013   |Comments (2)|Spotlights

Shelf.ioThe folks over at the Harvard Innovation Lab have created a very interesting tool/website called Shelf.io. What is shelf.io exactly? Well, it is, essentially, a collection of shelves. Shelves that are initially empty, but can be filled with all of your favorite things (bookmarks, books, media, just about anything). These shelves can be made public for all the internet to see, or private so that only you can see.

Shelf.io was created using the StackView jQuery plugin and is open source under the MIT and GPL licenses. If you’re feeling up to editing up your own version of Shelf.io grab the github code here.

I’ve started up my own personal Shelf.io at shelf.io/marcmestre. I’ve got two shelves that I’m working on currently, one is a showcase of all of the interesting Digital Publishing Services projects we’re working on, and the other is a collection of links to useful resources that I use a lot in my work. Check them both out! And while you’re at it, get your own shelf.io and start organizing some shelves of your own!

The folks over at the Harvard Innovation Lab have created a very interesting tool/website called Shelf.io. What is shelf.io exactly? Well, it is, essentially, a collection of shelves. Shelves that are initially empty, but can be filled with all of your favorite things (bookmarks, books, media, just about anything). These shelves can be made public […]MORE

First Video Tour of the MediaHub

Posted by: on June 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Last year, a proposal originated from within our department to develop a library-based multimedia center –  specifically, one that would assist and inspire Providence College faculty, staff, and student scholars in their digital media-inclusive work. After receiving approval from Academic Affairs, the now interdepartmental project – known currently as the MediaHub – has moved forward at a stunning rate. We have received much of the requested equipment and will be setting up the space over the summer, with a soft launch during the Fall 2013 semester. For those interested in seeing this space come to life, here is the first in a video series on the MediaHub, its complement, and our aims in offering this space. Keep posted for future installments!

Last year, a proposal originated from within our department to develop a library-based multimedia center –  specifically, one that would assist and inspire Providence College faculty, staff, and student scholars in their digital media-inclusive work. After receiving approval from Academic Affairs, the now interdepartmental project – known currently as the MediaHub – has moved forward […]MORE

DP @ PC: Summer Research Edition

Posted by: on May 28, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Isn’t it wonderful how things slow down in the summer?  Often, the summer season allows us to dig into projects and explore interests that have been set aside for more pressing tasks during the academic year.  I tend to make a list of digital publishing tools to research and gain facility with over the summer.  Here are four tools you might enjoy exploring as well:

prismPrism, an effort of UVA’s Scholars Lab, is a tool for collecting and visualizing crowd-sourced interpretations of texts.  “Users are invited to provide an interpretation of a text by highlighting words according to different categories, or “facets.” Each individual interpretation then contributes to the generation of a visualization which demonstrates the combined interpretation of all the users.”  Prism’s creators envision it as a tool for both pedagogical use and scholarly exploration.

 

metadata gamesFunded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, “Metadata Games is an online game system for gathering useful data on photo, audio, and moving image artifacts, enticing those who might not visit archives to explore humanities content while contributing to vital records. Furthermore, the suite enables archivists to gather and analyze information for image archives in novel and possibly unexpected ways.”  For more information, see this interview with Mary Flanagan, one of Metadata Games’ creators.

 

scoop itAccording to the creators of Scoop It, everyone is a publisher.  This tool allows users to curate content from the web around a specific theme or topic.  The pages you can create in Scoop It have an eye-catching layout bring images and multimedia to the foreground.  Scoop It is rapidly being adopted as a tool for creating content in academic libraries and educational institutions.

 

learnistYou may have heard of Pinterest?  Learnist is is a similar tool with an intellectual bent.  It acts as a visual repository of all your favorite articles, videos, ebooks, maps, surveys, blogs, podcasts, and images. You can create boards based on your interests and curate content around a chosen theme.

 

 

What do you plan to explore this summer???

Isn’t it wonderful how things slow down in the summer?  Often, the summer season allows us to dig into projects and explore interests that have been set aside for more pressing tasks during the academic year.  I tend to make a list of digital publishing tools to research and gain facility with over the summer.  […]MORE

Digital Public Library of America Launches!

Posted by: on April 18, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) launched a beta of its discovery portal today, delivering millions of freely available materials found in American archives, libraries, museums, and cultural heritage institutions to students, teachers, scholars, and the public. Read and discovery more at dp.la.

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) launched a beta of its discovery portal today, delivering millions of freely available materials found in American archives, libraries, museums, and cultural heritage institutions to students, teachers, scholars, and the public. Read and discovery more at dp.la.MORE