A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

While the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and... MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones. ... MORE

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
The Library of Congress's new homepage (Source)

The Library of Congress’s new homepage (Source)

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as part of the larger redesign of their site, currently in the works. The Library’s blog, The Signal, recently published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the Library of Congress, where she discussed user experience (UX) and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative, led by Smith. One of Project One’s biggest challenges, says Smith, is that the Library started sharing their (vast amount of) content early on the web, using older technologies, and a substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate the old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions need to be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata needs to be assigned to items. Once that foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to view the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as... MORE

Collections as Data 2016 Conference

Posted by: on September 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

CollectionsAsData 1A
On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website provides the following description for the event:

“The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.”

Participants had the option of attending in-person or virtually, as the event was live-streamed on the Library of Congress YouTube channel; members of the Digital Publishing Services team attended sessions virtually throughout the day. Sessions were open to the public and organizers asked that attendees use the hashtag #AsData in their tags. A video recording of the conference has been archived on the LOC YouTube channel. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website. (Source)

On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website... MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According... MORE

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have just been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it was not until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, as well as other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have just been released by Apple Records to digital... MORE

The 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

Photo via Source

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. In May of 2003, the show was canceled without formal announcement, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer, the host at the time, and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. The show made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011, but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013. The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder, identified as Tyler (no last name), and a team of volunteers. The archive does not present each episode in its original recorded form, but rather, lists the videos contained within each episode (and links out to their YouTube versions) and notes hosts and guest artists by episode. Visitors can view the archival listings by year and episode; the site is presented in a tiered layout, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings.

Source – the Cramps on 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (the Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet.

The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, the Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes, but was quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which... MORE

DPS Welcomes Elizabeth Schneider

Posted by: on January 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a User Relations Manager and Technical Services Lead.  Elizabeth brings a wealth of knowledge about digital asset management systems and metadata to the department.  In her new role as Digital Publishing Services Specialist Elizabeth will work on digitization projects, assist in the management of our Digital Commons and Islandora repositories, collaborate with faculty in the creation of SelectedWorks pages, and contribute to a variety of cross-library initiatives.  Welcome Elizabeth!

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s... MORE

Guest Post: Russell Franks on Infrared Photography

Posted by: on November 4, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College. 

PC_infrared_0502Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us with vital subtle clues and information about the world around us.

But there is another part of the light spectrum – infrared light – that we cannot see. We know it exists; scientists quantified it over one hundred years ago, but we can’t perceive it naturally without the aid of specialized recording equipment, such as a camera.

Infrared light lies between the visible and microwave portions (think microwave oven) of the electromagnetic spectrum. It also has a range of wavelengths, just like visible light has wavelengths that reflect the colors red to violet. The “near” infrared light spectrum, which is closest to the color red, is just beyond what we naturally see and “far” infrared is closest to the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

PC_infrared_0183My curiosity in infrared photography began during my analog camera days. In the pre-digital world infrared imaging required infrared sensitive film, an infrared filter for the camera lens, and a complicated focusing method since light in the infrared range focuses differently than the visible light we normally see.

However, my fascination with infrared imagery deepened upon realizing infrared photography extended the perception of my reality and my understanding in that there is more to see than what we actually see. The sense of other worldliness that infrared imagery suggests stretches the logic of my imagination in how I see mankind and nature interact with each other. This “through the lens” altered perception has even invaded my daily life. Every day I am confronted with various scenes that beg to be photographed in infrared to magically reveal the unseen play of light. This is just one part of nature I seek to explore through the medium of the lens.

As an artist, the infrared journey has been filled with surprise, frustration, and immense satisfaction, but more importantly this unveiling of the unseen natural world to the naked eye has permanently changed how I visually perceive my surroundings.

In the days of analog photography, infrared imagery was usually thought of as a specialized art form reserved for professionals. However, with the advent of digital photography, infrared imaging has become much easier and less expensive in the long run – not to mention a lot more FUN! True, having your digital camera converted for a few hundred dollars to “see” the infrared spectrum might be considered extravagant, but well worth it if you want to view the world – literally – in a different light.

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College.  Our eyes are... MORE

Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist (Open Position)

Posted by: on November 3, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

PML_fron_Fall_2015

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development of digital information content and presentation tools and services.

You can review the complete position description, essential duties, position requirement and apply here.

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to... MORE