New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science... MORE

Open Library of Humanities

Posted by: on December 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

From About OLH page:

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.

The OLH publishing platform supports academic journals from across the humanities disciplines, as well as hosting its own multidisciplinary journal. Launched as an international network of scholars, librarians, programmers and publishers in January 2013, the OLH has received two substantial grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to date, and has built a sustainable business model with its partner libraries.

All of our academic articles are subject to rigorous peer review and the scholarship we publish showcases some of the most dynamic research taking place in the humanities disciplines today – from classics, modern languages and cultures, philosophy, theology and history, to political theory, sociology, anthropology, film and new media studies, and digital humanities. Our articles benefit from the latest advances in online journal publishing – with high-quality presentation, annotative functionality, robust digital preservation, strong discoverability and easy-to-share social media buttons.

Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

olh-homepage-resized

From About OLH page: The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship... MORE

Copyright for Educators & Librarians

Posted by: on July 24, 2014   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

2Beginning this week, three colleagues and myself will be participating in an online workshop run through Duke University by Kevin Smith (M.L.S., J.D.), Lisa A. Macklin (J.D., M.L.S.), and Anne Gilliland (J.D., M.L.S.).

All three instructors began as librarians and went to law school in order to assist colleagues in schools, colleges, and libraries better understand copyright. Their principal role in their current positions is to help sort out copyright issues that arise in education and libraries. From their introductory bio on the class website:

“In all of these situations, our goal is to help teachers and librarians accomplish their legitimate educational goals in ways that respect copyright and reduce the fear and uncertainty that sometimes hampers creative teaching. As lawyers, we strive to find responsible ways to say ‘yes’ when asked if a new teaching idea or library services can be considered within the confines of the copyright law.”

Throughout the next four weeks, we will be learning about how the history, purpose, and structure of the United States copyright law is relevant to educators and librarians. For more more information about this course, please visit the course website.

Beginning this week, three colleagues and myself will be participating in an online workshop run through Duke University by Kevin... MORE

bioRxiv: Preprint Server for Biology

Posted by: on December 11, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

biorxiv

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used to introduce the results of new research within a scholarly community for initial review and feedback.

From Science:

BioRxiv, launched yesterday by the nonprofit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), aims to be biologists’ version of arXiv, the popular preprint server where physicists have shared their draft manuscripts for more than 20 years. The goal is to speed the dissemination of research and give scientists a way to get feedback on their papers before they are formally peer-reviewed.”

For more information read.

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for... MORE

The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion by Dr. Erik Chaput

Posted by: on August 6, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03 alum and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) has published, The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion.” Through his engaging narrative, Dr. Chaput shows the Dorr Rebellion as a critical moment of American history leading up to the Civil War. The rebellion was the only revolutionary republican movement in the antebellum period that claimed the people’s sovereignty as the basis for the right to alter or abolish a form of government.

You can read a complete summary of The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion” and reviews at the University Press of Kansas Website, here.

chapeo

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03 alum and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) has published, The People’s Martyr:... MORE

Dissertation Embargo Debate

Posted by: on August 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

During their June 2013 meeting, the American Historical Association drafted a statement on policies regarding best practices for history PhD dissertation embargoes. The recent release of that policy statement, which recommends allowing for an embargo period of as much as six years, generated reactions on both sides of the debate. Last week, a post on the Harvard University Press Blog titled, “Can’t Find It, Can’t Sign It: On Dissertation Embargoes” provided a balanced view on the issue.

During their June 2013 meeting, the American Historical Association drafted a statement on policies regarding best practices for history PhD... MORE

Fred Friend on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Posted by: on July 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

Independent journalist Richard Poynder has been conducting interviews with leaders, thinkers, and practitioners of the Open Access Movement for some time (list of interviews dating back to 2001). Recently, Poynder spoke with Fred Friend, librarian, committed advocate for Open Access and attendee at the 2001 meeting that led to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), where the term Open Access was coined and defined. Friend has also worked for the UK organization JISC, and has recently undertaken consultancy work for the European Commission and for Knowledge Exchange.

Interview excerpts:

What in your view have been the major achievements of the OA movement since you helped draft the definition of OA in Budapest in 2001?

I am continually amazed by the fact that the concept of open access to publicly-funded research outputs, as we drafted in the Initiative, is now on the agenda of governments and funding agencies across the world.

We proved to be the “butterfly effect” that has led to the winds of change blowing through scholarly communication, not because we planned it that way but because what we proposed in the BOAI chimed with the until then unexpressed hopes of hundreds of thousands of researchers to use the Internet in ways which benefit human society.

What are your expectations for OA in 2013?

Obviously more growth in OA content and commitment, but perhaps even more important are the stories we are beginning to hear of the value of sharing research and teaching resources freely across the world.

Open access is good in itself, but the real benefit from the ability of researchers, teachers and learners to share content without financial, legal or technical barriers lies in the intellectual, economic and social growth which results from that sharing.

Click here for the complete Fred Friend interview.

Independent journalist Richard Poynder has been conducting interviews with leaders, thinkers, and practitioners of the Open Access Movement for some... MORE

DPS Presents on Inti at Conference

Posted by: on June 10, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

On May 31, 2013 Mark Caprio, Christiane Marie Landry, and Marc Mestre presented Publishing Inti: a Suite of Services Case Study at the first annual Querying the Library: Digitization and Its Impact conference at Rhode Island College.

For more on Inti be sure to check out the Inti web site and the Inti Archive.

RIC Conf Collage Sized for Web

Other presentations at the conference covered: converting EPUBS to PDFS, open access and the institutional repository, the role of the conservator in the digitization program at BC, building digital libraries, using technology to promote active learning, and more.  It was a fruitful and interesting day and we hope to be involved again next year.

On May 31, 2013 Mark Caprio, Christiane Marie Landry, and Marc Mestre presented Publishing Inti: a Suite of Services Case... MORE

New guide makes citing film and audio easier

Posted by: on April 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

Front-cover-image-Audiovisual Citation GuidelinesDoes the word “citation” make you want to take a snooze?  We don’t blame you.  But if you’ve ever tried to cite something specifically challenging like a YouTube video or a TV commercial, you probably know the frustration that can ensue.  Thankfully, the British Universities Film and Television Council has just released a new set of Audiovisual Citation Guidelines that simplify the process.  The guidelines “address the growing need for a clear, comprehensive and consistent system for the citation of moving image and sound.”  They demonstrate citations for a variety of media including television and radio shows, audio recordings, DVD extras, video and audio clips, trailers, advertisements, amateur and archive material, podcasts, and more.

Here are a couple of examples from the guidelines:

Television Show Accessed Online:
Roddy Doyle’, Writer in Profile [television program clip, online] Pres. David Hanly. RTÉ, Ireland, 10/06/1992, RTÉ 1. 5mins 59secs. http://www.euscreen.eu/play.jsp?id=EUS_74BF381109E04797841DB8C2E30E20EF (accessed 29/09/2012).

Music Track:
‘Romance No.2 in F Major, op. 50’, Chill with Beethoven [music track, CD] Cond. Kenneth Jean, Perf. Slovak Philharmonic orchestra. Naxos, UK, 31/01/2006. 4mins 42secs. [Naxos, 8.556790, 2006].

User-Generated Online Content:
Kittys Meet [user-generated content, online] Creat. BFvsGF. 19/01/2013, 7mins 28secs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34hoyQ7oc2k (accessed 21/01/2013)

For more on this visit the British Universities Film and Television Council’s web page, or download the Audiovisual Citation Guidelines themselves.   You can also view the Phillips Memorial Library’s citation guide for further help with citations in a variety of formats and styles.

Does the word “citation” make you want to take a snooze?  We don’t blame you.  But if you’ve ever tried... MORE

Journal of Library Administration Editorial Board Resigns

Posted by: on March 27, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

The tweet/blog ‘osphere has been buzzing in recent days about the resignation of the entire editorial board of the Journal of Library Administration. Board members had requested that publisher Taylor & Francis be more aligned with current Library and Information Studies professionals’ expectations with respect to author licensing agreements. Taylor & Francis offered a less restrictive license in exchange for what would amount to an author-paid $2995 article publication fee. The board found this unacceptable and resigned.

You can read more about this at Confessions of a Science Librarian’s blog post, “Journal of Library Administration editorial board resigns over author rights.”

The tweet/blog ‘osphere has been buzzing in recent days about the resignation of the entire editorial board of the Journal... MORE