Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of fame are represented, from Elizabeth I and Aphra Behn to anonymous and pseudonymous writers. Here are just a few of the texts:


Cavendish, Margaret (Lucas), Duchess of Newcastle: The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing-World, 1667. An early work of sci-fi!

Neither was it a wonder that the men did freeze to death; for they were not onely driven to the very end or point of the Pole of that World, but even to another Pole of another World, which joined close to it…

By this Poetical Description, you may perceive, that my ambition is not onely to be Empress, but Authoress of a whole World; and that the Worlds I have made, both the Blazing- and the other Philosophical World, mentioned in the first part of this Description, are framed and composed of the most pure, that is, the Rational parts of Matter, which are the parts of my Mind…And in the formation of those Worlds, I take more delight and glory, then ever Alexander or Cesar did in conquering this terrestrial world.


Sowernam, Ester: Esther Hath Hang’d Haman, 1617. One of several responses to Joseph Swetnam’s misogynistic pamphlet “The Arraignment of Lewd, Idle, Froward, and Unconstant Women”, this text methodically points out holes in Swetnam’s logic and refutes his points in like manner.

He runneth on, and saith, They were made of a Rib, and that their froward and crooked nature doth declare, for a Rib is a crooked thing, &c. Woman was made of a crooked rib, so she is crooked of conditions. Joseph Swetnam was made as from Adam of clay and dust, so he is of a durty and muddy disposition.


Barbauld, Anna Laetitia (Aikin): Poems, 1773. Poetry about nature, politics and current events, the poet’s friends, and other subjects.

From glittering scenes which strike the dazzled sight
With mimic grandeur and illusive light,
From idle hurry, and tumultous noise,
From hollow friendships, and from sickly joys,
Will Delia, at the muse’s call retire
To the pure pleasures rural scenes inspire?
Will she from crowds and busy cities fly,
Where wreaths of curling smoke involve the sky,
To taste the grateful shade of spreading trees,
And drink the spirit of the mountain breeze?


And from her Sins of Government, Sins of the Nation, 1793:

If an oppressive law, or a destructive war, were of the nature of a volcano or a hurricane, proceeding from causes totally independent of our operations, all we should have to do, would be to bow our heads in silent submission, and to bear their ravages with a manly patience. We do not repent of a dangerous disorder or a sickly constitution, because these are things which do not depend upon our own efforts…But we are called upon to repent of national sins, because we can help them, and because we ought to help them.

There are some, whose nerves, rather than whose principles, cannot bear cruelty — like other nuisances, they would not chuse it in sight, but they can be well content to know it exists, and that they are indebted for it to the increase of their income, and the luxuries of their table.


Davies, Lady Eleanor: The Benediction, 1651. Davies published a number of works in which she interpreted Biblical prophecies in Daniel and Revelation through anagrams, numerology, and other tools to apply to current events. She anagrammed her own maiden name, Eleanor Audelie, as “Reveale O Daniel.” This document asserts God’s blessing on Oliver Cromwell.

By whom Decypher’d that Generals Thundring Donative his the Crown and Bended Bowe (Rev. 6.) That Seal or Box of Nard opened; as much to say, O: Cromwel, Renowned be Victorious so long as Sun Moon continues or livever.

Anagram, Howl Rome: And thus with one voice, come and see, O: C: Conquering and to Conquer went forth.


Take a look at the WWO database while it’s still Women’s History Month!

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern... MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web viewing and for use with no copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project, and Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a recent statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site here, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative... MORE

Open Access Monographs Coming to JSTOR

Posted by: on November 20, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

jstor-logo

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, UCL Press, and Cornell University Press) are currently available.

“The introduction of this Open Access program is part of our ongoing efforts to expand discovery, access, and use of scholarly materials,” noted Frank Smith, Books at JSTOR Director. “We look forward to sharing what we learn with the scholarly communications community.”

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that... MORE

Open Access Week: Three Open Access-related Videos Worth Watching

Posted by: on October 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

In honor of Open Access week, Digital Publishing would like to share with you three movies related to Open Access and copyright issues: RIP: A Remix Manifesto, The Internet’s Own Boy, and Copyright Criminals.

 

RIP: A Remix Manifesto: release date – ca. 2009

A film by web activist Brett Gaylor and musician Greg Gillis, aka Girl Talk. This is a compelling and fun movie about the history of copyright and its implications on creativity. It draws upon the work of Girl Talk, and the filmmaker himself, as some of the examples of the complexities surrounding copyright law in regards to sampling music, film, etc., and using other artists creativity as a stepping stone for their own work.

The Internet’s Own Boy: release date – 2014

From DocumentaryStorm:

The Internet’s Own Boy follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity.

Copyright Criminals: release date – 2009

From Vimeo:

A documentary that examines the creative and commercial value of sampling in music. Featuring Public Enemy, De La Soul, QBert and more

Still from RIP: A Remix Manifesto

Still from Copyright Criminals

screen-shot-2016-10-27-at-1-56-00-pm

Still from The Internet’s Own Boy

In honor of Open Access week, Digital Publishing would like to share with you three movies related to Open Access... MORE

Folger Digital Anthology is Live!

Posted by: on August 4, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The long-awaited (at least by me) Folger Digital Anthology has been released! The Folger Shakespeare Library, whose online texts of the Bard are something of a gold standard, announced a little while back that they’d also be releasing an online anthology of TEI-encoded non-Shakespearean plays from the early modern period. The collection includes 403 plays that were performed professionally between the 1576 construction of The Theatre, England’s first successful permanent theatre, and the 1642 closure of the theatres due to the English Civil War. Some of the plays are old chestnuts that already have a bunch of online transcriptions, but in browsing the genre categories (which include the comedies, tragedies, and histories familiar to fans of Shakespeare, but also tragicomedies, morality plays, classical legends, pseudo-histories, and more – Meaghan J. Brown, the project leader, discusses genre decisions here) I found some that, as far as I can tell, were not previously accessible to the general public online.

Here it is: A Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama

The long-awaited (at least by me) Folger Digital Anthology has been released! The Folger Shakespeare Library, whose online texts of... MORE

Vatican Affliate Digitizes 1,600-Year-Old Illuminated Manuscript of the Aeneid

Posted by: on July 25, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.

DVL

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the... MORE

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science... MORE

Open Access Science Research in Europe

Posted by: on June 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. Rebecca’s professional focus is academic libraries, research and research education, and digital publishing. Rebecca will be providing more posts during her internship, so stay tuned!]

Recently, the Netherlands EU Presidency announced that all publicly-funded scientific research in Europe will be published as open access by 2020. They also released The “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science,” a document which lists the goals, steps, and benefits of open access in the sciences.

Releasing scientific research as open access articles will make new research more relevant and available to researchers, as well as interested citizens. Open science “has the potential to increase the quality and benefits of science by making it faster, more responsive to societal challenges, more inclusive and more accessible to new users” (“The Amsterdam Call for Action” 4, 2016). By making these articles freely available, new research can be read as soon it comes out by anyone who’s interested, rather than requiring access through a university after an embargo period or paid access to a single article. Open access in the sciences will also benefit those outside the science field. The Call for Action notes that by making research available to the public, entrepreneurs can use the findings to come up with new products and services.

A link to the full-text of the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science” is provided at European University Association News.

Open Science

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School... MORE

Europe’s Open Access Champions launches

Posted by: on April 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.

EOAC

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions –... MORE

Paul Klee’s Notebooks Online

Posted by: on March 11, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.

Klee-Notebooks

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online... MORE