Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of fame are represented, from Elizabeth I and Aphra Behn to anonymous and pseudonymous writers. Here are just a few of the texts:


Cavendish, Margaret (Lucas), Duchess of Newcastle: The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing-World, 1667. An early work of sci-fi!

Neither was it a wonder that the men did freeze to death; for they were not onely driven to the very end or point of the Pole of that World, but even to another Pole of another World, which joined close to it…

By this Poetical Description, you may perceive, that my ambition is not onely to be Empress, but Authoress of a whole World; and that the Worlds I have made, both the Blazing- and the other Philosophical World, mentioned in the first part of this Description, are framed and composed of the most pure, that is, the Rational parts of Matter, which are the parts of my Mind…And in the formation of those Worlds, I take more delight and glory, then ever Alexander or Cesar did in conquering this terrestrial world.


Sowernam, Ester: Esther Hath Hang’d Haman, 1617. One of several responses to Joseph Swetnam’s misogynistic pamphlet “The Arraignment of Lewd, Idle, Froward, and Unconstant Women”, this text methodically points out holes in Swetnam’s logic and refutes his points in like manner.

He runneth on, and saith, They were made of a Rib, and that their froward and crooked nature doth declare, for a Rib is a crooked thing, &c. Woman was made of a crooked rib, so she is crooked of conditions. Joseph Swetnam was made as from Adam of clay and dust, so he is of a durty and muddy disposition.


Barbauld, Anna Laetitia (Aikin): Poems, 1773. Poetry about nature, politics and current events, the poet’s friends, and other subjects.

From glittering scenes which strike the dazzled sight
With mimic grandeur and illusive light,
From idle hurry, and tumultous noise,
From hollow friendships, and from sickly joys,
Will Delia, at the muse’s call retire
To the pure pleasures rural scenes inspire?
Will she from crowds and busy cities fly,
Where wreaths of curling smoke involve the sky,
To taste the grateful shade of spreading trees,
And drink the spirit of the mountain breeze?


And from her Sins of Government, Sins of the Nation, 1793:

If an oppressive law, or a destructive war, were of the nature of a volcano or a hurricane, proceeding from causes totally independent of our operations, all we should have to do, would be to bow our heads in silent submission, and to bear their ravages with a manly patience. We do not repent of a dangerous disorder or a sickly constitution, because these are things which do not depend upon our own efforts…But we are called upon to repent of national sins, because we can help them, and because we ought to help them.

There are some, whose nerves, rather than whose principles, cannot bear cruelty — like other nuisances, they would not chuse it in sight, but they can be well content to know it exists, and that they are indebted for it to the increase of their income, and the luxuries of their table.


Davies, Lady Eleanor: The Benediction, 1651. Davies published a number of works in which she interpreted Biblical prophecies in Daniel and Revelation through anagrams, numerology, and other tools to apply to current events. She anagrammed her own maiden name, Eleanor Audelie, as “Reveale O Daniel.” This document asserts God’s blessing on Oliver Cromwell.

By whom Decypher’d that Generals Thundring Donative his the Crown and Bended Bowe (Rev. 6.) That Seal or Box of Nard opened; as much to say, O: Cromwel, Renowned be Victorious so long as Sun Moon continues or livever.

Anagram, Howl Rome: And thus with one voice, come and see, O: C: Conquering and to Conquer went forth.


Take a look at the WWO database while it’s still Women’s History Month!

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of […]MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available this month for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative (in partnership with Wikimedia Commons) and enables users to access photos of (a portion of) the Met’s inventory for web viewing and use without copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project. Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available this month for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative (in partnership with Wikimedia Commons) and enables users to access photos of (a portion of) the Met’s inventory for web viewing […]MORE

Open Access Monographs Coming to JSTOR

Posted by: on November 20, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

jstor-logo

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, UCL Press, and Cornell University Press) are currently available.

“The introduction of this Open Access program is part of our ongoing efforts to expand discovery, access, and use of scholarly materials,” noted Frank Smith, Books at JSTOR Director. “We look forward to sharing what we learn with the scholarly communications community.”

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, […]MORE

Open Access Week: Three Open Access-related Videos Worth Watching

Posted by: on October 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

In honor of Open Access week, Digital Publishing would like to share with you three movies related to Open Access and copyright issues: RIP: A Remix Manifesto, The Internet’s Own Boy, and Copyright Criminals.

 

RIP: A Remix Manifesto: release date – ca. 2009

A film by web activist Brett Gaylor and musician Greg Gillis, aka Girl Talk. This is a compelling and fun movie about the history of copyright and its implications on creativity. It draws upon the work of Girl Talk, and the filmmaker himself, as some of the examples of the complexities surrounding copyright law in regards to sampling music, film, etc., and using other artists creativity as a stepping stone for their own work.

The Internet’s Own Boy: release date – 2014

From DocumentaryStorm:

The Internet’s Own Boy follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity.

Copyright Criminals: release date – 2009

From Vimeo:

A documentary that examines the creative and commercial value of sampling in music. Featuring Public Enemy, De La Soul, QBert and more

Still from RIP: A Remix Manifesto

Still from Copyright Criminals

screen-shot-2016-10-27-at-1-56-00-pm

Still from The Internet’s Own Boy

In honor of Open Access week, Digital Publishing would like to share with you three movies related to Open Access and copyright issues: RIP: A Remix Manifesto, The Internet’s Own Boy, and Copyright Criminals.   RIP: A Remix Manifesto: release date – ca. 2009 A film by web activist Brett Gaylor and musician Greg Gillis, aka Girl Talk. This […]MORE

Folger Digital Anthology is Live!

Posted by: on August 4, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The long-awaited (at least by me) Folger Digital Anthology has been released! The Folger Shakespeare Library, whose online texts of the Bard are something of a gold standard, announced a little while back that they’d also be releasing an online anthology of TEI-encoded non-Shakespearean plays from the early modern period. The collection includes 403 plays that were performed professionally between the 1576 construction of The Theatre, England’s first successful permanent theatre, and the 1642 closure of the theatres due to the English Civil War. Some of the plays are old chestnuts that already have a bunch of online transcriptions, but in browsing the genre categories (which include the comedies, tragedies, and histories familiar to fans of Shakespeare, but also tragicomedies, morality plays, classical legends, pseudo-histories, and more – Meaghan J. Brown, the project leader, discusses genre decisions here) I found some that, as far as I can tell, were not previously accessible to the general public online.

Here it is: A Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama

The long-awaited (at least by me) Folger Digital Anthology has been released! The Folger Shakespeare Library, whose online texts of the Bard are something of a gold standard, announced a little while back that they’d also be releasing an online anthology of TEI-encoded non-Shakespearean plays from the early modern period. The collection includes 403 plays […]MORE

Vatican Affliate Digitizes 1,600-Year-Old Illuminated Manuscript of the Aeneid

Posted by: on July 25, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.

DVL

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.MORE

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site […]MORE

Open Access Science Research in Europe

Posted by: on June 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. Rebecca’s professional focus is academic libraries, research and research education, and digital publishing. Rebecca will be providing more posts during her internship, so stay tuned!]

Recently, the Netherlands EU Presidency announced that all publicly-funded scientific research in Europe will be published as open access by 2020. They also released The “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science,” a document which lists the goals, steps, and benefits of open access in the sciences.

Releasing scientific research as open access articles will make new research more relevant and available to researchers, as well as interested citizens. Open science “has the potential to increase the quality and benefits of science by making it faster, more responsive to societal challenges, more inclusive and more accessible to new users” (“The Amsterdam Call for Action” 4, 2016). By making these articles freely available, new research can be read as soon it comes out by anyone who’s interested, rather than requiring access through a university after an embargo period or paid access to a single article. Open access in the sciences will also benefit those outside the science field. The Call for Action notes that by making research available to the public, entrepreneurs can use the findings to come up with new products and services.

A link to the full-text of the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science” is provided at European University Association News.

Open Science

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. […]MORE

Europe’s Open Access Champions launches

Posted by: on April 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.

EOAC

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.MORE

Paul Klee’s Notebooks Online

Posted by: on March 11, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.

Klee-Notebooks

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.MORE

Open Library of Humanities

Posted by: on December 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

From About OLH page:

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.

The OLH publishing platform supports academic journals from across the humanities disciplines, as well as hosting its own multidisciplinary journal. Launched as an international network of scholars, librarians, programmers and publishers in January 2013, the OLH has received two substantial grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to date, and has built a sustainable business model with its partner libraries.

All of our academic articles are subject to rigorous peer review and the scholarship we publish showcases some of the most dynamic research taking place in the humanities disciplines today – from classics, modern languages and cultures, philosophy, theology and history, to political theory, sociology, anthropology, film and new media studies, and digital humanities. Our articles benefit from the latest advances in online journal publishing – with high-quality presentation, annotative functionality, robust digital preservation, strong discoverability and easy-to-share social media buttons.

Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

olh-homepage-resized

From About OLH page: The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the […]MORE

SelectedWorks is Getting an Upgrade

Posted by: on November 20, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

 SelectedWorks, the faculty webpage builder from Bepress, is receiving an upgrade very soon! Digital Publishing ServicesScreen Shot 2015-11-20 at 11.29.16 AM will be trained and updated on the exciting new features.  In the meantime, have a look at Providence College’s present SelectedWorks site.

Stay tuned!

 SelectedWorks, the faculty webpage builder from Bepress, is receiving an upgrade very soon! Digital Publishing Services will be trained and updated on the exciting new features.  In the meantime, have a look at Providence College’s present SelectedWorks site. Stay tuned!MORE

UK Launches First Fully OA University Press

Posted by: on June 21, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

University College London (UCL) announced the launch of UCL Press on June 4, 2015. UCL Press is described as the first fully Open Access university press in the UK. The Press will focus on scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals. Inaugural titles include:  Temptation in the Archives by Lisa Jardine, Treasures from UCL by Gillian Furlong and The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections by Alice Stevenson.

UCLPress

University College London (UCL) announced the launch of UCL Press on June 4, 2015. UCL Press is described as the first fully Open Access university press in the UK. The Press will focus on scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals. Inaugural titles include:  Temptation in the Archives by Lisa Jardine, Treasures from UCL by Gillian Furlong and The Petrie […]MORE

The Cowl Digitization Project Has Entered the 1980s

Posted by: on June 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital Publishing Services’ ongoing digitization of back issues of the Cowl has enter a new phase, the 1980s!

Providence College’s student newspaper, The Cowl, began publication on November 16th, 1935. It has been published continuously each academic year since then, with the exception of two years in the 1940’s during World War II

We will continue to digitize the Cowl up to the point that it became a ‘born digital’ newspaper. At that point,001 we hope to collect all of the born digital copies and archive them in Digital Commons as well.

Digital Publishing Services’ ongoing digitization of back issues of the Cowl has enter a new phase, the 1980s! Providence College’s student newspaper, The Cowl, began publication on November 16th, 1935. It has been published continuously each academic year since then, with the exception of two years in the 1940’s during World War II We will […]MORE

Providence College Army Specialized Training Program Site Now Live

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/.

astp

PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) for leadership roles within the Army during World War II.  During the program’s short tenure over 500 soldiers from around the country lived and took classes at Providence College. The ASTP Program was important to Providence College as it kept enrollments up during the war. The program concluded nationally when soldiers were needed on the battlefields of Europe as war efforts increased.

PC’s ASTP collection includes video, photographs, correspondence, newspaper coverage, archival materials, and more.  While the site remains a work in progress in terms of organization and curation, it is complete in terms of presenting digitized content.  Please explore the collection and let us know if you have thoughts or feedback using the commenting feature on each item’s page, or be emailing us at dps@providence.edu.  We are especially interested in identifying individuals pictured in the collection photographs.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/. PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) […]MORE

New Journal: Sociology Between the Gaps

Posted by: on March 5, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share that our newest journal collaboration has launched.  Sociology Between the Gaps is a new, innovative, peer-reviewed, open-access, cross-disciplinary, independent online journal being published using the Digital Commons platform.  The journal also aims to reflect the intersections of social class, race, gender, age, and cross-disciplinary views by encouraging sociologists and professionals in related fields to submit work on topics that cross disciplinary boundaries and/or areas of specialization but effectively link disciplines to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective on the topics addressed.  The first issue, Adoption and Families: National and International Perspectives, is currently open for submissions.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share that our newest journal collaboration has launched.  Sociology Between the Gaps is a new, innovative, peer-reviewed, open-access, cross-disciplinary, independent online journal being published using the Digital Commons platform.  The journal also aims to reflect the intersections of social class, race, gender, age, and cross-disciplinary views by encouraging sociologists […]MORE

Providence College’s Digital Commons Celebrates 1 Million Downloads

Posted by: on February 26, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, Providence College’s Digital Commons, an online platform for publishing College scholarship and creative work, reached a milestone. Since its launch in 2007, Digital Commons content has been collectively downloaded more than one million times. To celebrate and highlight meaningful faculty, student and library collaborations, the Digital Publishing Services (DPS) team has created the following video.

 

Recently, Providence College’s Digital Commons, an online platform for publishing College scholarship and creative work, reached a milestone. Since its launch in 2007, Digital Commons content has been collectively downloaded more than one million times. To celebrate and highlight meaningful faculty, student and library collaborations, the Digital Publishing Services (DPS) team has created the following video. […]MORE

Historic Catholic & Dominican Documents in Digital Commons

Posted by: on February 20, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

thumbnailRecently added to Providence College’s Digital Commons, courtesy of Phillips Memorial Library’s Special Collections, is a specialty section of historic Catholic and Dominican documents, including selections by Pope Benedict XV, Reverend John Proctor, and the Catholic Church. Visit the site to take a look!

Recently added to Providence College’s Digital Commons, courtesy of Phillips Memorial Library’s Special Collections, is a specialty section of historic Catholic and Dominican documents, including selections by Pope Benedict XV, Reverend John Proctor, and the Catholic Church. Visit the site to take a look!MORE

Coming soon! Digital Commons Promotional Video!

Posted by: on February 5, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Screen Shot 2015-02-04 at 8.58.39 AMThe DPS has been tirelessly working on a promotional video for the Digital Commons.  The catalyst for this video was Providence College reaching a milestone of 1 million full-text downloads from the Digital Commons site! The video is forthcoming. Stay tuned!!

The DPS has been tirelessly working on a promotional video for the Digital Commons.  The catalyst for this video was Providence College reaching a milestone of 1 million full-text downloads from the Digital Commons site! The video is forthcoming. Stay tuned!!MORE

PC’s Digital Commons Reaches 1 Million Downloads!

Posted by: on January 8, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access
photo by flickr user ludovik

photo by flickr user ludovik available here

It’s official, Providence College’s Digital Commons has reached 1 Million Downloads!

Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository, a place for faculty and students to publish their scholarly and creative work on the web. Managed by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons, the repository was launched in 2007. Digital Commons now hosts over 4,000 items, which have been downloaded over one million times!

To learn more about Digital Commons at PC, check out this post.  Now, for the party hats and confetti!

 

 

 

It’s official, Providence College’s Digital Commons has reached 1 Million Downloads! Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository, a place for faculty and students to publish their scholarly and creative work on the web. Managed by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons, the repository was launched in 2007. Digital Commons now hosts over 4,000 items, […]MORE

Five Key Moments in the Open Access Movement in the Last Ten Years

Posted by: on October 22, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Oxford University Press Logo

This week, the library and information community along with others in academia are celebrating International Open Access Week. In a post on the Oxford University Press (OUP) blog, OUP publisher Rhodri Jackson lists five key open access to research events since OUP’s beginning participation in the Open Access (OA) Movement: 1) Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) converts to OA in 2004/05; 2) the National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandate OA in 2008 to NIH-funded research; 3) Springer buys BioMed Central (BMC) in 2008; 4) Public Library of Science (PLOS) ONE‘s growth in 2007; and 5) The ‘Finch’ Report in 2012, positively impacting OA.

For details on each of the five listed events, see Jackson’s full post here.

This week, the library and information community along with others in academia are celebrating International Open Access Week. In a post on the Oxford University Press (OUP) blog, OUP publisher Rhodri Jackson lists five key open access to research events since OUP’s beginning participation in the Open Access (OA) Movement: 1) Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) […]MORE

Open Access Week Events at Providence College

Posted by: on October 16, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

pc_oaw_logo_web

In celebration of Open Access Week, a SPARC-organized international series of events recognizing open access initiatives and issues, Digital Publishing Services will be offering several open access-related events to the Providence College community. Open access is an umbrella term referring to any online resources, scholarship, or projects that are shared publicly without requiring a paid subscription or institutional affiliation. The importance of open access initiatives is that they are developed and operated in the interest of free knowledge. Here are the Open Access Week 2014 events that will be held in the Phillips Memorial Library:

World Bank and SPARC Announce Open Access Week
Monday, October 20; 3:00 pm – ­ 4:00 pm
Library eClassroom

SPARC and the World Bank will co-host the official kickoff event for International Open Access Week 2014. The program will focus on this year’s theme of “Generation Open.” Speakers will discuss the importance of students and early career researchers in the transition to Open Access and explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers.

Open Access Drop-In
Wednesday, October 22; 11:00 am ­- 1:00 pm
Library Entryway

Drop in anytime between 11am-1pm to to learn more about:

  • Digital Commons
  • SelectedWorks
  • Open Access (OA)
  • How you can get involved

Light (open access-themed!) refreshments will be served!

ACRL Presents – Celebrating Open Access Week: Scholarly Communication Initiatives at Academic Libraries
Thursday, October 23; 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Location TBD

There are many ways that academic librarians are engaging with their communities around issues of open access and scholarly communication – collaborations with faculty, students and administration are key to understanding user perspectives and to building advocacy.  This webcast will present examples of scholarly communication and open access initiatives at a variety of academic libraries across the country.  Join us to learn how your colleagues are engaging with their communities around issues of author rights, open access, open educational resources, and more.

Film Screening and Discussion: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
Friday, October 24; 2:30 pm –  4:00 pm
Library eClassroom

Join us for a screening and discussion of The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz.. The film follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity. This film is a personal story about what we lose when we are tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties.

To view the full schedule, visit http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/oaw/2014/.

Hope to see you in the Library for these interesting events!

 

 

In celebration of Open Access Week, a SPARC-organized international series of events recognizing open access initiatives and issues, Digital Publishing Services will be offering several open access-related events to the Providence College community. Open access is an umbrella term referring to any online resources, scholarship, or projects that are shared publicly without requiring a paid […]MORE

Free Audio Resources without Copyright Restrictions

Posted by: on September 30, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions that a student’s video project would be more effective with the use of music.  Teachers might find these sites useful to explain copyright issues to students in regards to stealing music, etc. from the web, by showing them what music is actually in the public domain and has a Creative Commons License. Of course, these sites might also Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 11.29.51 AMbenefit teachers for their own projects, as well.

A few great sites for finding free music include:

  • Free Music Archive: This is a great site that hosts a wide range of music genres in a high quality format, free of charge.
  • Sound Bible: This site is an excellent source for various sound effects, such as: dog barks, city sounds, wind sounds, etc.
  • SoundGator: This is also a great site for various sound effects, sound bites and sound clips that are in the public domain with a Creative Commons License.

 

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions […]MORE

Digital Commons at Providence College Nearing One Million Downloads

Posted by: on July 31, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College is part of a consortium of higher education and special libraries (i.e., Higher Education Library and Information Network / HELIN Consortium). In 2005, the HELIN Central Office, supported by the HELIN Board of Library Directors, was awarded a grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to support implementation of a consortium-wide institutional repository (IR). Grant funds provided that a distinct repository would be created for each HELIN institutional library. Each library’s IR would implement unique institutional domain names and branding.

Digital Commons at Providence College was officially launched on February 14th, 2007. Initially, the repository contained a small set of pre-prints, journals and special collection imaged artifacts. Through ongoing fruitful cross-departmental collaborations, the College can now boast four thousand digital objects in Digital Commons at Providence College representing a wide range of document types–College scholarly output and archival materials.

Digital Commons at Providence College is nearing the one million download mark; that is, collectively the four thousand resources now available will reach one million downloads. The Phillips Memorial Library Digital Publishing Services team will announce when Digital Commons at Providence College reaches one million downloads. Cause for celebration, methinks!

DCHome

The Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College is part of a consortium of higher education and special libraries (i.e., Higher Education Library and Information Network / HELIN Consortium). In 2005, the HELIN Central Office, supported by the HELIN Board of Library Directors, was awarded a grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to support implementation of […]MORE

Try DIY, Not Green Or Gold Open Access

Posted by: on May 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Harvey Goldstein and John Bynner, writing in the Opinion section of the UK’s online weekly magazine reporting on higher education news and issues, Times Higher Education, take a very direct approach to the future of scholarly publishing: DIY (Do It Yourself). Goldstein and Bynner find the Green and Gold Open Access approaches unacceptable–both still conceding too large profit margins to commercial scholarly publishers. Goldstein and Bynner believe in time that high-quality publishing tools and academy-controlled journal publishing will “make the gold-green debate increasingly irrelevant.”

For more read their article here.

Harvey Goldstein and John Bynner, writing in the Opinion section of the UK’s online weekly magazine reporting on higher education news and issues, Times Higher Education, take a very direct approach to the future of scholarly publishing: DIY (Do It Yourself). Goldstein and Bynner find the Green and Gold Open Access approaches unacceptable–both still conceding […]MORE

The National Jukebox at the Library of Congress

Posted by: on April 15, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally.Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 10.36.47 AM

The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.

You can find out more about the project here .

This project often involves a painstaking process of analyzing various copies of the same 78rpm recording  and finding just the right one for digitization.

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Here is a slideshow example of the workflow process from beginning to end.

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally. The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary […]MORE

Cultural Anthropology Goes Open Access

Posted by: on February 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This week, a prominent journal in anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, has gone open access. Cultural Anthropology is a peer-reviewed academic journal, which covers issues related to theory, research, public dissemination, and ethnography across a variety of perspectives in the field of anthropology. The journal going open access means that it has become freely available to the public without any cost associated. This status will allow for new opportunities in scholarship, communication, and dialogue to occur. The open access movement has arisen in part in protest to the privatization of intellectual work. For more about this development, please click here.

JCA

This week, a prominent journal in anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, has gone open access. Cultural Anthropology is a peer-reviewed academic journal, which covers issues related to theory, research, public dissemination, and ethnography across a variety of perspectives in the field of anthropology. The journal going open access means that it has become freely available to the […]MORE

Copyright Myths and Guidelines

Posted by: on January 23, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

 

On January 16th, DPS attended a workshop called, “Copyright Skills as Risk Management Tools: The Librarians Role,” hosted by the Association of Rhode Island Health Science Libraries at CCRI Lincoln.  Most of  the attendees were medical librarians and had important questions regarding the duplication of medical articles requested by doctors and practitioners. Many brought up the Contu Guidelines. Often citing the ambiguity surrounding what is the proper amount of photocopies to make of a certain article, and highlighting the ignorance of copyright knowledge shown by their requester.

Here are a few interesting links presented at the workshop:

downloadCopyright Myths-a publication of the Graphic Arts Guild: This is a great article that helps to debunk some of the myths surrounding the copyright of creative works, such as music, arts, literature, etc.  Often creating scenarios that  people might be confronted with when wanting to use someone else’s piece of music, photograph, etc. for their own purpose and explaining what the actual laws are regarding those scenarios, and not the “assumptions” of what is correct.

download (1)Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in academic and research libraries: The ARL was created in 1932 to address common issues that university and research librarians might be dealt with. The ARL Code of Best Practices is a set of eight situations that are designed to help librarians make informed decisions regarding what materials can be shared and duplicated for educational and research purposes. And it is important because it enables librarians to have a clearer understanding of what items are fair use and what are not. Here are a few FAQs regarding Best Practices.

  On January 16th, DPS attended a workshop called, “Copyright Skills as Risk Management Tools: The Librarians Role,” hosted by the Association of Rhode Island Health Science Libraries at CCRI Lincoln.  Most of  the attendees were medical librarians and had important questions regarding the duplication of medical articles requested by doctors and practitioners. Many brought […]MORE

bioRxiv: Preprint Server for Biology

Posted by: on December 11, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

biorxiv

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used to introduce the results of new research within a scholarly community for initial review and feedback.

From Science:

BioRxiv, launched yesterday by the nonprofit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), aims to be biologists’ version of arXiv, the popular preprint server where physicists have shared their draft manuscripts for more than 20 years. The goal is to speed the dissemination of research and give scientists a way to get feedback on their papers before they are formally peer-reviewed.”

For more information read.

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used […]MORE

Open Access Button recently launched

Posted by: on November 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser.

“People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it slows innovation, kills curiosity and harms patients. This is an indictment of the current system. Open Access has given us the solution to this problem by allowing everyone to read and re-use research. We created the Open Access Button to track the impact of paywalls and help you get access to the research you need. By using the button you’ll help show the impact of this problem, drive awareness of the issue, and help change the system. Furthermore, the Open Access Button has several ways of helping you get access to the research you need right now.”

Be sure to check out the map to see the breakdown of paywalls across the globe. Hint: zooming in will afford a more granular look at the paywall statistics.

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser. “People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it […]MORE

Letters of 1916: Creating History

Posted by: on October 4, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Trinity College Dublin has launched what it is calling “the first public humanities project in Ireland.” The Letters of 1916 project is crowd-sourcing digital history through public engagement and community collection building to commemorate the centenary of the Easter Rising (1 November 1915 – 31 October 1916). Community members are being invited to participate in the project by uploading private letters and photographs dating from the period.

LettersProject1916

For more details see Letters of 1916: Creating History.

Trinity College Dublin has launched what it is calling “the first public humanities project in Ireland.” The Letters of 1916 project is crowd-sourcing digital history through public engagement and community collection building to commemorate the centenary of the Easter Rising (1 November 1915 – 31 October 1916). Community members are being invited to participate in […]MORE

Dissertation Embargo Debate

Posted by: on August 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

During their June 2013 meeting, the American Historical Association drafted a statement on policies regarding best practices for history PhD dissertation embargoes. The recent release of that policy statement, which recommends allowing for an embargo period of as much as six years, generated reactions on both sides of the debate. Last week, a post on the Harvard University Press Blog titled, “Can’t Find It, Can’t Sign It: On Dissertation Embargoes” provided a balanced view on the issue.

During their June 2013 meeting, the American Historical Association drafted a statement on policies regarding best practices for history PhD dissertation embargoes. The recent release of that policy statement, which recommends allowing for an embargo period of as much as six years, generated reactions on both sides of the debate. Last week, a post on the […]MORE

Fred Friend on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Posted by: on July 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

Independent journalist Richard Poynder has been conducting interviews with leaders, thinkers, and practitioners of the Open Access Movement for some time (list of interviews dating back to 2001). Recently, Poynder spoke with Fred Friend, librarian, committed advocate for Open Access and attendee at the 2001 meeting that led to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), where the term Open Access was coined and defined. Friend has also worked for the UK organization JISC, and has recently undertaken consultancy work for the European Commission and for Knowledge Exchange.

Interview excerpts:

What in your view have been the major achievements of the OA movement since you helped draft the definition of OA in Budapest in 2001?

I am continually amazed by the fact that the concept of open access to publicly-funded research outputs, as we drafted in the Initiative, is now on the agenda of governments and funding agencies across the world.

We proved to be the “butterfly effect” that has led to the winds of change blowing through scholarly communication, not because we planned it that way but because what we proposed in the BOAI chimed with the until then unexpressed hopes of hundreds of thousands of researchers to use the Internet in ways which benefit human society.

What are your expectations for OA in 2013?

Obviously more growth in OA content and commitment, but perhaps even more important are the stories we are beginning to hear of the value of sharing research and teaching resources freely across the world.

Open access is good in itself, but the real benefit from the ability of researchers, teachers and learners to share content without financial, legal or technical barriers lies in the intellectual, economic and social growth which results from that sharing.

Click here for the complete Fred Friend interview.

Independent journalist Richard Poynder has been conducting interviews with leaders, thinkers, and practitioners of the Open Access Movement for some time (list of interviews dating back to 2001). Recently, Poynder spoke with Fred Friend, librarian, committed advocate for Open Access and attendee at the 2001 meeting that led to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), where […]MORE

Introducing Digital Commons

Posted by: on July 2, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital CommonsWhat is an institutional repository?

Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository.  Well, what does institutional repository mean, and why is having one useful for an academic community?

Scholar Raym Crow defines institutional repositories (IRs) as, “digital collections that preserve and provide access to the intellectual output of a single or multi-university community”  (Crow, 2002 SPARC position paper, “The Case for Institutional Repositories”).

Basically, an IR is a place where scholarship written by a given institution’s students, faculty, and staff is made freely accessible online.  IRs are usually managed through an institution’s library.  IRs expand access to research, increase the institution’s visibility online, and provide long-term preservation of the institution’s digital scholarship.

What makes Providence College’s Digital Commons unique?

Providence College Digital Commons Discipline WheelProvidence College’s Digital Commons contains over 2964 records, which have been downloaded a total of 590088 times.  Items include research, scholarship and creative works by Providence College faculty and students in a variety of media and formats including articles, monographs, white papers, proceedings, presentations, theses, artworks, performances, and multimedia products; as well as digitized primary source materials from the library’s Special and Archival Collections.

The content in PC’s Digital Commons comes from a range of academic disciplines.  Click on the discipline wheel image to the right to explore the range of content that’s represented.

What kind of content is added to the repository regularly?

The Digital Publishing Services Department is adding content to Digital Commons all the time.  Here is a selection of items we have added recently:

 Want to publish?  Have questions?

Contact me, Hailie Posey (hposey@providence.edu), with questions about publishing in Providence College’s Digital Commons.

 

What is an institutional repository? Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository.  Well, what does institutional repository mean, and why is having one useful for an academic community? Scholar Raym Crow defines institutional repositories (IRs) as, “digital collections that preserve and provide access to the intellectual output of a single or multi-university community”  (Crow, 2002 […]MORE