DPS Goes to DigiCamp

DPS Goes to DigiCamp

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comment (1)|Facilities and Tools

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology.

This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by Carolyn Goldstein and Andrew Elder on the Mass Memories Road Show, a state-wide digital history project that documents people, places, and events in Massachusetts history. The photographs and stories are preserved and publicly accessible in UMass Boston’s Open Archives.

The breakout session topics, collaboratively chosen by participants in advance of the event, included Technology for Users; Accessibility; Social Media/Marketing/Outreach; Digital Humanities, Preservation, and Pedagogy; VR/Video Games; Web/Course Guide Design and UX; Instructional Design/Teaching with Technology; OER, Open Access, and Altmetrics; Makerspaces; Interfaces & Collections; Cool Tools; and Assessment & Data. I attended the Technology for Users, VR/Video Games, and Makerspaces sessions, and got some great ideas for our MediaHub in Phillips Memorial Library.
The highlight of the day was a tour of and workshop in the UMass Boston MakerSpace lab, where we saw some 3D printing in action and learned the basics of 3D design, including a tutorial in Tinkercad, a free, web-based 3D design tool.

Looking forward to next year!

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology. This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by […]MORE

A New Look for PC’s Digital Commons

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio Art senior theses along with original student artworks in a variety of media. Check it out at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/.

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio […]MORE

Google’s New PhotoScan App Turns Prints into High-Quality Digital Images

Posted by: on December 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows you to quickly scan multiple photos, while also guiding you through scanning different parts of each photo to produce a much higher-quality image that reduces glare and shadow. The app also offers automatic rotation, cropping, and color-correction. Naturally, PhotoScan seamlessly integrates with Google Photos, but you can also save your scans to your camera roll or share them in other apps.

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows […]MORE

1666 London on Two Video Game Maps

Posted by: on November 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

This past September was the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, and the Museum of London has augmented its commemorative “Fire! Fire!” exhibit with a Minecraft map in which players explore the city and fight the fire as it occurs. (NYT article here – one Youtube video of gameplay can be watched here.) One stated goal of using games to convey historical information is to attract and engage children and non-traditional museum patrons — but it’s also interesting to think about ways in which the game might provide a new learning experience even for people with a more conventional history background. For instance, you might read in a book or article that the spread of the fire is partly attributed to the Mayor’s delay in ordering the destruction of houses to create firebreaks — but you could also, as in the gameplay video linked above, run a long way through confusing, similar-looking burning streets to find the Mayor and bring him to the site where the fire started, because your objective as a player is to get him to give the order, and then feel the frustration when he refuses! (Empathy is a subject that comes up in discussion of history-based and history education video games.)

Another video game-related map is Pudding Lane Productions’s 2013 Cryengine map of the area where the fire began, which won the “Off the Map” competition for developing 3D video game scenery based on maps from the British Library. The developers’ discussion of their process reveals some of the challenges that also face scholars working with historical documents. Using the maps as their source, they were able to lay out the streets and the footprints of the buildings, but found that the resulting model was not cramped enough and lacked vitality. Revisions increased the overhang of buildings’ upper stories into the streets, as well as adding crates, carts, vendors’ stalls, wares hung outside shops, washing lines, and other “props” that wouldn’t have made it onto maps, but that were nonetheless a part of London and people’s experience of life in the city. Additionally, they added as many real attested businesses as possible, using historical sources like Samuel Pepys’s diary; this lends the map a great deal of accuracy, but also highlights the gaps in our knowledge of day-to-day life, since most of the houses and businesses on the map did simply have to be generic and modular.

Interestingly, the Pudding Lane developers also mention that “[o]ne key issue caused by following the source material so closely was that a lot of seventeenth-century London looked very similar”. They addressed this by using different palettes in different areas. (This map doesn’t have any people on it, but if it had, perhaps the difference in areas would be established by populating them with different kinds of non-player characters going about their business.) This issue is very prominent in the less-sophisticated Minecraft map as well, but in that game it might be a feature instead of a bug.

This past September was the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, and the Museum of London has augmented its commemorative “Fire! Fire!” exhibit with a Minecraft map in which players explore the city and fight the fire as it occurs. (NYT article here – one Youtube video of gameplay can be watched here.) […]MORE

Digital Publishing Services Welcomes You!

Posted by: on September 1, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you:

  • scholarly communication and copyright
  • personal digital archiving and digital asset management
  • scanning and digitization
  • media creation
  • journal publishing
  • text encoding and other digital humanities tools
  • graphic design
  • data visualization

For assistance contact dps@providence.edu.  We wish you all the best this academic year!

Phillips Memorial Library, your Finals Week study haven. #pcgrad #gofriars #pc2017 #friargram #pc2019

A photo posted by Phillips Memorial Library (@clubphil_pc) on

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you: scholarly communication […]MORE

Theology Collections Portal

Posted by: on July 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Posey_Image2If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the kiosk according to their research goals.  Options include:

  • Find Scholarly Sources for a Paper (articles, ebooks, specific journal titles)
  • Explore Theology Topics (major religions, Thomas Aquinas, Catholicism and Catholic social thought)
  • Find Bibles and Biblical Commentary
  • Get Research Help
  • Provide Feedback

Kiosk content is presented via a content management system (CMS) called Scalar.  Scalar provides a platform for the creation of rich, digital publications that integrate text and media using a variety of flexible templates.  A signature design element in Scalar is the ability to create multiple narrative paths through a work.  This path functionality made Scalar an ideal CMS for the creation of the theology kiosk content.  Additionally, Scalar presents built-in visualization tools, which allow creators to explore and adjust the relationships between content in different ways.   Scalar is supported by the Alliance for Networked Visual Culture.

You are welcome to explore the Theology Collections Portal online as well as at the iPad kiosk in the library.  Please do contact us with questions or suggestions-  our primary goal is to make the kiosk as helpful as possible for our researchers and your feedback is greatly valued!

 

If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the […]MORE

Hypothes.is

Posted by: on June 16, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and online resources easy for everyone to annotate. Annotations can be used to leave comments on specific lines of text (rather than in a comments section), provide citations, view what other researchers have commented, or take notes for personal use.

Hypothes.is is available as a bookmarklet, a Google Chrome extension, and as an addition to a website. For more information or to get started annotating, visit the Hypothes.is website.

Hypothes.is_logo

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and […]MORE

1,300-Year-Old Writings Inside Later Bookbindings

Posted by: on June 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of the time to cut up and recycle handwritten books from the middle ages following the invention of printing. Thanks to macro x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (MA-XRF), it has become possible to read these older texts used to create 15th through 18th century manuscripts without removing the bookbindings.

Read the full post “X-rays reveal 1,300-year-old writings inside later bookbindings” by Dalya Alberge at The Guardian, US Edition.

bookbinding-16th

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of […]MORE

Engaging Users and Remixing Content: New York Public Library’s Digital Collections

Posted by: on February 12, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic views of the U.S., but as I delved deeper, I discovered all of the exciting tools and initiatives that they’ve integrated into the collections to encourage discovery, interaction, sharing, research, and reuse. In particular, I’ve been musing on the fantastic visual browsing tool. Data visualization is still often thought of simply as a graphic, sometimes interactive, representation of statistics and other data, but it also clearly has so much potential as a tool for discovery, by helping users to better understand the scope of the information that they’re searching or exploring.

A thousand skaters, Central Park

Strohmeyer & Wyman, “A thousand skaters, Central Park” (1889), stereoscopic image (via NYPL)

Beyond content visualization, NYPL is championing active user/content engagement with the Digital Collections API, a Remix Residency program and other tools from the creative folks at NYPL Labs, like The Green Book trip planner, which uses “locations extracted from mid-20th century motor guides that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, and other destinations where Black travelers would be welcome.”

For those of us who spend most of our days in the weeds of content management, NYPL’s Digital Collections initiatives are a great reminder to think innovatively about how we can better connect and engage users with digital collections.

For some Friday fun, check out their Stereogranimator and create some 3D images!

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic […]MORE

2016 MediaHub Updates

Posted by: on January 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

MHBWIf you have not yet heard or made use of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer. The MediaHub is a multimedia center located on the first floor of the library, which aims to assist and inspire Providence College’s students, faculty, staff in their digital media-inclusive work. Stationary equipment is located within the space and loanable equipment is available upon request from the Circulation Desk, located next to the library’s front entrance. Specialized assistance is available from the Digital Publishing Services Lab.

Static equipment includes five high-end iMac computers, equipped with a variety of media hardware and software, including iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Audacity, Lynda.com, and GarageBand; three lockboxes for equipment with plexiglass windows and multiple cable knockouts; specialized audio recording equipment; and Epson scanners. Loanable equipment includes video cameras, digital cameras, drawing tablets, green screen lighting kits, portable digital audio recorders, MIDI keyboards, and microphones, and peripherals to aid in use and storage including tripods, external hard drives, memory cards, headphones, and cables. Loanable equipment has a loan time of 7 days. For more information, please visit Digital Publishing Services’ MediaHub webpage, where you can view a comprehensive online catalog of equipment, listing of item availability, image gallery, and tutorials.

If you have not yet heard or made use of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer. The MediaHub is a multimedia center located on the first floor of the library, which aims to assist and inspire Providence […]MORE

New Epson Scanner for DPS Lab

Posted by: on July 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

The DPS Lab has a new addition: an Epson Expression 11000xl Flatbed Scanner!  With a scanning area of 12.2″ x 17.2″ it can handle most of our project requests in the lab.  It also comes with a transparency head for scanning photo negatives of various sizes.  This multi-faceted scanner will handle the bulk of the DPS Lab’s projects, along with our two Microtek flatbed scanners, and the Atiz cradle scanner.

Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 9.42.55 AM

The DPS Lab has a new addition: an Epson Expression 11000xl Flatbed Scanner!  With a scanning area of 12.2″ x 17.2″ it can handle most of our project requests in the lab.  It also comes with a transparency head for scanning photo negatives of various sizes.  This multi-faceted scanner will handle the bulk of the […]MORE

ACRL Conference 2015: Spacing Out with the Library

Posted by: on May 7, 2015   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

ACRL_Logo1

Tomorrow (Friday, May 8th, 2015) is the annual Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) New England Chapter conference, held at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. This year’s theme is “Spacing Out with the Library: An Exploration of Collaboration Across the Physical, Virtual and those Places in Between”. At the heart of this theme will be the questions, “What does it take to expand ‘the library’ beyond its traditional physical space?” and “With whom are we working to expand our services?” Addressing these questions will be keynote speakers Marie S.A. Sorensen (Architects + Planners, Inc.) and David Weinberger (Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society) as well as numerous regional librarians and library workers.

We at Digital Publishing Services are excited about what conversations the conference might explore, as much of our work relates to creating connections between the physical and the virtual, and exploring the nature of those connections as they proliferate and evolve. Some sessions of interest to DPS, as they relate to our own digital initiatives, include: “Books in e-Space – How Far Do Students Go?”; “New Object Models and APIs: Foregrounding Re-Use in a Digital Repository”, which posed structural questions regarding institutional repositories, and how to best reflect complex objects and relationships digitally; “Federated Open Access: Balancing the Needs of the Many and the Needs of the Few”; and “Strengthening Service through Collaboration: Digital Scholarship at the University of Connecticut Libraries”.

For more information on the 2015 ACRL NEC Conference, visit http://conference2015.acrlnec.org/.

Hope to see some of our readers there!

Tomorrow (Friday, May 8th, 2015) is the annual Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) New England Chapter conference, held at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. This year’s theme is “Spacing Out with the Library: An Exploration of Collaboration Across the Physical, Virtual and those Places in Between”. At the heart of […]MORE

4DSound & the Future of Library Media Spaces

Posted by: on November 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

4dsys_full_front

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than just stereo; its sixteen vertical speaker columns and complex control system can reproduce sounds in a way unlike anything heard before. Listeners can move through the space, experiencing sounds move around them over time – even sometimes giving the illusion that one is passing between the present and the past.

What does this futuristic system have to do with libraries? Well, if the technology behind it becomes more accessible, we could see a huge shift in experiencing media, especially within libraries of the future. If libraries continue aligning themselves with user media expectations, and even become instructional centers for new media, they may soon host experimental spaces similar to 4DSound – spaces for their community to realize applications yet to be conceived. What’s more, imagine how this might impact music librarianship: the release of new 4d-enchanced audio providing patrons a greater sense of how spatial sound is.

Now, of course, not all advances in media forever change the landscape (quadrophonic sound anyone?), but more generally we in libraries should keep our ear to the ground (excuse the bad wordplay…) to know what may becoming, and what we might be able to bring to our patrons if they haven’t brought it to us first.

While you’re waiting for the future to arrive, please enjoy this video of a recent hack session at 4DSound as inspiration: http://vimeo.com/111579911.

 

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than […]MORE

Club Phil Megamix Video

Posted by: on July 23, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

During this spring and summer break, members of DPS have been experimenting with the MediaHub loanable equipment to get a fuller sense of what possibilities it offers to our patrons. We’re happy to say that they are pretty endless. To demonstrate this and promote the MediaHub, we’ve created a short music video & song featuring the library’s ambient sounds, some of which you might recognize if you’ve spent time in “Club Phil,” as the students call it. So, here for you’re viewing pleasure is “Club Phil Megamix” – a video created exclusively using MediaHub equipment, software and some staff know-how.

The video was recorded using two Panasonic 32GB HC-X900M HD camcorders and two Davis & Sanford Provista 7518FM tripods. All sampled sounds were recorded with a Tascam DR-40 digital handheld recorder and edited in Audacity. The song itself was arranged within GarageBand, using an Akai MPK Mini MIDI controller to program in the melodic elements and additional beats. Finally, the video was edited within Final Cut Pro X. All software and equipment listed is available through the MediaHub. If you are interested to learn more about the MediaHub and the resources we offer through it, please feel free to contact us at dps@providence.edu. We’d be happy to hear from you!

In the meantime, sit back (or dance if you wanna) and enjoy the video!

 

During this spring and summer break, members of DPS have been experimenting with the MediaHub loanable equipment to get a fuller sense of what possibilities it offers to our patrons. We’re happy to say that they are pretty endless. To demonstrate this and promote the MediaHub, we’ve created a short music video & song featuring […]MORE

IRENE Audio Preservation

Posted by: on April 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

irene

Yesterday, I was fortunate to attend a fascinating lecture on audio preservation given by Thomas Reiger of the Northeast Document Conservation Center. The specific focus of the lecture was on a new preservation system known as IRENE, a digital imaging system that converts captured visual data (2D and 3D, depending on the analog format) and converts that data into listenable audio waveforms.

IRENE (short for “Image, Reconstruct, Erase Noise, Etc.”) first utilizes high-resolution 2D and 3D camera technology to safely document with extreme precision the physical state of analog audio discs and wax cylinders. Following this capturing process, the software creates an image map of the whole physical object and determines, based on the physical state of the grooves, what the raw audio waveform would be. This proves to be an extremely effective system when working with fragile or broken audio materials that otherwise would be destroyed through other transcription processes.

The output of the waveform, according to Reiger, is then presented in a “pure” archival state – meaning that little to no audio engineering treatments are applied by the NEDCC. This is an intentional decision on behalf of the organization, as they want to follow a digitization model that prioritizes cultural and material integrity. The end result, as can be heard on the IRENE Seeing Sound Blog, is remarkable – especially when considering that many of the original objects would be otherwise unplayable. (Of particular note is the Helen Hartness Flanders Archive, hosted by Middlebury College, and the work the NEDCC has done with the Woody Guthrie Archives.)

I asked Reiger if the NEDCC was investigating models of crowd-sourcing the engineering of these files, so that a range of desired interpolations could be offered to various audiences. This, to an extent, is being considered and the NEDCC is already working with engineers seeking to offer curated versions of the material. It will be interesting to see how the IRENE technology develops over time and how models of support might shift with a greater adoption of inter-media transcription technologies.

Yesterday, I was fortunate to attend a fascinating lecture on audio preservation given by Thomas Reiger of the Northeast Document Conservation Center. The specific focus of the lecture was on a new preservation system known as IRENE, a digital imaging system that converts captured visual data (2D and 3D, depending on the analog format) and […]MORE

Media Hub site officially launched

Posted by: on April 11, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

http://www.providence.edu/library/PublishingImages/rotator-images/media-hub%20rotator/mediaHub3.jpg

The MediaHub is a campus collaborative space that offers patrons support in creating, editing, and producing a wide range of multimedia, and now it’s website is officially launched!

Check it out here

Get access to Media Hub tutorials, peruse the listing of loanable Media Hub equipment, or take a look at some photos in the image gallery! If you have any feedback or suggestions for the Media Hub site do not hesitate to email them to dps@providence.edu.

 

The MediaHub is a campus collaborative space that offers patrons support in creating, editing, and producing a wide range of multimedia, and now it’s website is officially launched! Check it out here Get access to Media Hub tutorials, peruse the listing of loanable Media Hub equipment, or take a look at some photos in the […]MORE

Library E-Faire on April 1st!

Posted by: on March 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

e-faire poster

On Tuesday April 1st, Phillips Memorial Library will host an e-faire on the main level of the library, which will include food and prizes!  Stop by from 3-5pm to see what is new in the world of online resources, and enter for a chance to win an iPod shuffle and iTunes gift card.  Digital Publishing Services will be there to promote new resources, BrowZine and SelectedWorks.  For more info about this event, please click here.

mrtImages courtesy of PML Access Services.

On Tuesday April 1st, Phillips Memorial Library will host an e-faire on the main level of the library, which will include food and prizes!  Stop by from 3-5pm to see what is new in the world of online resources, and enter for a chance to win an iPod shuffle and iTunes gift card.  Digital Publishing […]MORE

MediaHub Loanable Equipment

Posted by: on January 31, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

mediahub2

We’re excited to announce that an assortment of MediaHub hardware is available for patron loan later in the Spring 2014 semester! In the interest of expanding our multimedia services and facilities, patrons are now able to work on their multimedia projects outside the scope of our physical space and hours. All loanable material is viewable through the HELIN catalog and can be checked out in the Phillips Memorial Library. (Loan periods of items may vary.) Introductory training on the equipment can be offered via appointment (dps@providence.edu).

Here is a brief listing of some items available through the MediaHub:

  • Panasonic HC-X900M HD camcorders
  • Canon PowerShot G15 digital cameras
  • Tascam DR-40 portable audio recorders
  • Wacom Intuos 5 tablets
  • AKAI USB MIDI keyboards

For a full listing, please visit the HELIN catalog entry or inquire at dps@providence.edu.

 

 

 

We’re excited to announce that an assortment of MediaHub hardware is available for patron loan later in the Spring 2014 semester! In the interest of expanding our multimedia services and facilities, patrons are now able to work on their multimedia projects outside the scope of our physical space and hours. All loanable material is viewable […]MORE

Dynamic Shape Display & Motion Synth (New Forms of Interactivity)

Posted by: on December 6, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

We in Digital Publishing Services try to closely follow new advances in computing and multimedia, particularly if they directly impact scholarly or artistic creation. So, it was quite exciting to find out about two new projects that could significantly influence creative technologies over the next few years. Here, for your interest, are demo videos of the two systems: the inFORM dynamic shape display and the Motion Synth for iPhone and iPod Touch.

inFORM dynamic shape display (MIT)

The first is a “dynamic shape display” developed by MIT’s Tangible Media Group. This interface allows users to “interact with digital information in a tangible way” by physically rendering 3D content through a grid of digitally-controlled columns. It’s a very captivating project, and seems to have potential both in terms of teaching and creative generation, but also as a useful technology for disabilities access.

Motion Synth for iPhone and iPod Touch (AUUG)

AUUG’s Motion Synth offers a simple solution for gestural composition with the iPhone – an specially-designed aluminum frame that is fastened around the user’s hand, ensuring that the device won’t fall and that access to the touch screen isn’t impeded. While this may seem like just a matter of ergonomics at first, AUUG has also create a program that would utilize the device’s internal sensing, relaying the physical information back to a compatible musical software or hardware. In effect, you can modify sounds in new, physically expressive ways through this system. One can envision this offering a very unique and approachable way of creating and engaging with multimedia works.

For more information, see the project pages at MIT and AUUG:

http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/

http://www.auug.com/

We in Digital Publishing Services try to closely follow new advances in computing and multimedia, particularly if they directly impact scholarly or artistic creation. So, it was quite exciting to find out about two new projects that could significantly influence creative technologies over the next few years. Here, for your interest, are demo videos of […]MORE

MediaHub Catalog

Posted by: on September 19, 2013   |Comments (3)|Facilities and Tools

2As we continue situating and preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing an inventory catalog, for use by patrons.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase all of the MediaHub’s static/loanable equipment, along with specifications and features for each item.

The catalog’s design riffs off of, and complements, other branding that we have developed for the MediaHub over recent weeks. A printed copy will be available in the MediaHub, Access Services, and on the web.  Provided here is a sample page from the catalog.  More to come soon!

As we continue situating and preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing an inventory catalog, for use by patrons.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase all of the MediaHub’s static/loanable equipment, along with specifications and features for each item. The catalog’s design riffs off […]MORE

MediaHub Tutorials

Posted by: on September 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video production; basic audio editing; media backup and archiving; online video services; and more! So, here is the first installment on basic video production. In the video, I’ll demonstrate to you how to record video, transfer it to an iMac, edit the footage in iMovie, and share the final project on YouTube. And certainly, if anyone viewing this has questions following the video, you are more than welcome to contact the DPS department at dps@providence.edu.

Stay tuned for other installments!

http://bit.ly/dpstutorials

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video […]MORE

Library Spaces

Posted by: on September 5, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Hello all,

This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the pipeline like tying in space requesting, video tours, and possibly an interactive floor plan. The site is still in very early development, we’re hoping we can get something up and published before the semester is over, maybe even before October hits. Hopefully!

 

If you’re interested in some of the inspiration behind our Library Spaces site, check out some of our favorites below:

http://libraries.mit.edu/study/ – MIT’s setup is super clean and functional, they’ve managed to fit all of the important information about a space into a neat little block of content. I like the use of icons here as well.

http://www.library.ucsf.edu/services/computing – UCSF breaks down their spaces by function, which I think is super handy for students who need to get something done in the library but might not know exactly where to go to do it.

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/learningspaces – NCSU has a great multimedia component complementing their spaces page(s). Nice pictures and a slick gallery highlight the spaces nicely.

Hello all, This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the […]MORE

Studio Art Majors: Student Work Collection

Posted by: on August 28, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Department of Art and Art History and the Phillips Memorial Library have been collaborating on an exciting project this summer—the creation of a digital collection representing Providence College Art Studio students’ work, presented at student senior shows. Each year, images from senior shows in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture will be added to the evolving collection, reflecting a diversity of intellectual, creative expression and of formats from Providence College Art Studio students. To view the collection, visit Studio Art Majors: Student Work.

StudioArtistsPC

The Department of Art and Art History and the Phillips Memorial Library have been collaborating on an exciting project this summer—the creation of a digital collection representing Providence College Art Studio students’ work, presented at student senior shows. Each year, images from senior shows in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture will be […]MORE

3D printing starting to catch on in libraries

Posted by: on August 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

3d printer in action

Libraries are beginning to offer, for a fee and a bit of training, access to 3d printing. The LA Times has recently published an article about 3d printing and some of the libraries that are beginning to venture into offering 3d printing services. Check out the article here: http://lat.ms/1exwWnV

One of the pioneer libraries offering 3d printing is the Cleveland Public Library, check out their 3d printer info page here: http://bit.ly/1cOg4wE

 

 

Libraries are beginning to offer, for a fee and a bit of training, access to 3d printing. The LA Times has recently published an article about 3d printing and some of the libraries that are beginning to venture into offering 3d printing services. Check out the article here: http://lat.ms/1exwWnV One of the pioneer libraries offering […]MORE

MediaHub Video Update

Posted by: on July 19, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

With its development moving right along, seems that it’s time to provide another installment in our MediaHub video series! In this video, I give another quick tour of the space as it is now, and discuss some of the equipment the MediaHub will offer our patrons. It’s a great experience to see this new collaborative space take shape in the Phillips Memorial Library, and it is our hope that the Providence College community feels similarly. Stay tuned for more updates as the summer moves along!

With its development moving right along, seems that it’s time to provide another installment in our MediaHub video series! In this video, I give another quick tour of the space as it is now, and discuss some of the equipment the MediaHub will offer our patrons. It’s a great experience to see this new collaborative […]MORE