Prince and Copyright

Prince and Copyright

Posted by: on June 29, 2017   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news, and two stories of note have emerged in recent months.

The first centers around a fair use debate (similar to the fair use case covered in an earlier post, regarding Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a reference photo as inspiration for the piece). The estate of Andy Warhol has filed suit against New York City photographer, Lynn Goldsmith, as a preemptive strike against her to protect Warhol’s legacy; according to the NY Daily News, Goldsmith had been expected to file a copyright infringement lawsuit against the estate. Goldsmith alleges that Warhol used a photo she took of Prince in 1981 as inspiration for his Prince Series (created in 1984) without asking or crediting her.

The estate argues that Warhol’s appropriation of the photo was transformative enough to be considered new work (therefore, fair use under U.S. copyright law) and Goldsmith is ignoring this aspect in an extortion attempt. Estate lawyer, Luke Nikas, stated in court documents that, “Although Warhol often used photographs taken by others as inspiration for his portraits, Warhol’s works were entirely new creations. As would be plain to any reasonable observer, each portrait in Warhol’s Prince Series fundamentally transformed the visual aesthetic and meaning of the Prince Publicity Photograph.” When asked why she did not pursue legal measures at any point over the past 30 years, Goldsmith said that she was only made aware of the pieces in 2016, when Condé Nast published a special issue called, The Genius of Prince. The estate counters that she knew of the pieces as far back as 1984, when she granted permission to Vanity Fair to publish one of them.

Prince’s image isn’t the only thing sparking debate – his catalog of work is, as well. While his Warner Bros. music catalog was released earlier this year to digital streaming platforms, his videography remains largely inaccessible to the public due to copyright dispute. Will his full videography be made available at some point? And further, will the public ever gain access to the material in his Paisley Park estate’s storied vault? It’s been speculated that nearly all of the contents of the vault lack thorough rights contracts. Prince’s estate has been in flux for some time, as it battles to resolve contractual disputes with Universal and Warner over rights. Since his passing in April 2016, various issues involving rights have arisen – the hope is for speedy resolution to all issues of copyright, so the public may freely access his work. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news, and two stories of note have emerged in recent months. The first centers around a fair use debate (similar to the fair use case covered in an earlier post, regarding Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a reference photo as inspiration […]MORE

Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection Releases Hundreds of Digitized Images

Posted by: on April 21, 2017   |Comment (1)|Digital Asset Management

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s personal archive. Adler served as director of publicity for Def Jam Records and Rush Artist Management from 1984-1990, where he worked alongside producers Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons, during an era when the label released notable albums by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys, Slick Rick, Run-DMC, EPMD, and De La Soul. Cornell’s curator of rare books and manuscripts, Katherine Reagan, comments that, “Bill’s files are a rich and deep resource for the study of hip-hop’s emergence in the popular press and as a force within the music industry, and they enrich our understanding of hip-hop’s 40-year history.”

The Hip Hop Collection is part of the Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. They received Adler’s archive in 2013, but the newly added pieces represent only 5 percent of the full archive – the rest can be seen in person at the library, for now. The library plans to digitize the rest of Adler’s archive over the next few years, and this recent batch includes over 1700 images. Adler started collecting in the 70s, when there were few resources about hip-hop and the internet did not exist. “But there was a tremendous explosion of writing about hip-hop in real time,” he said. “I’m thrilled to know that the collection is going to be made available to anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection, anywhere in the world.” (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill […]MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web viewing and for use with no copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project, and Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a recent statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site here, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web […]MORE

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
The Library of Congress's new homepage (Source)

The Library of Congress’s new homepage (Source)

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as part of the larger redesign of their site, currently in the works. The Library’s blog, The Signal, recently published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the Library of Congress, where she discussed user experience (UX) and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative, led by Smith. One of Project One’s biggest challenges, says Smith, is that the Library started sharing their (vast amount of) content early on the web, using older technologies, and a substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate the old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions need to be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata needs to be assigned to items. Once that foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to view the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as part of the larger redesign of their site, currently in the works. The Library’s blog, The Signal, recently published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the […]MORE

Collections as Data 2016 Conference

Posted by: on September 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

CollectionsAsData 1A
On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website provides the following description for the event:

“The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.”

Participants had the option of attending in-person or virtually, as the event was live-streamed on the Library of Congress YouTube channel; members of the Digital Publishing Services team attended sessions virtually throughout the day. Sessions were open to the public and organizers asked that attendees use the hashtag #AsData in their tags. A video recording of the conference has been archived on the LOC YouTube channel. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website. (Source)

On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website provides the following description for the event: “The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. […]MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the […]MORE

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have just been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it was not until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, as well as other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have just been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it was not until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, […]MORE

The 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

Photo via Source

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. In May of 2003, the show was canceled without formal announcement, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer, the host at the time, and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. The show made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011, but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013. The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder, identified as Tyler (no last name), and a team of volunteers. The archive does not present each episode in its original recorded form, but rather, lists the videos contained within each episode (and links out to their YouTube versions) and notes hosts and guest artists by episode. Visitors can view the archival listings by year and episode; the site is presented in a tiered layout, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings.

Source – the Cramps on 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (the Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet.

The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, the Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes, but was quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands […]MORE

2016 MediaHub Updates

Posted by: on January 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

MHBWIf you have not yet heard or made use of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer. The MediaHub is a multimedia center located on the first floor of the library, which aims to assist and inspire Providence College’s students, faculty, staff in their digital media-inclusive work. Stationary equipment is located within the space and loanable equipment is available upon request from the Circulation Desk, located next to the library’s front entrance. Specialized assistance is available from the Digital Publishing Services Lab.

Static equipment includes five high-end iMac computers, equipped with a variety of media hardware and software, including iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Audacity, Lynda.com, and GarageBand; three lockboxes for equipment with plexiglass windows and multiple cable knockouts; specialized audio recording equipment; and Epson scanners. Loanable equipment includes video cameras, digital cameras, drawing tablets, green screen lighting kits, portable digital audio recorders, MIDI keyboards, and microphones, and peripherals to aid in use and storage including tripods, external hard drives, memory cards, headphones, and cables. Loanable equipment has a loan time of 7 days. For more information, please visit Digital Publishing Services’ MediaHub webpage, where you can view a comprehensive online catalog of equipment, listing of item availability, image gallery, and tutorials.

If you have not yet heard or made use of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer. The MediaHub is a multimedia center located on the first floor of the library, which aims to assist and inspire Providence […]MORE

Library of Congress Passes New Exemption to Copyright Law

Posted by: on November 25, 2015   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against the theft of intellectual property, and it renews and expands protections for fair use. Request for the exemption comes in reaction to a law that forbids users from breaking Digital Rights Management (DRM), as users often have to circumvent DRM to make full use of their devices. DRM is, “a term referring to various access control technologies that are used to restrict the usage of proprietary software, hardware, or content. DRM includes technologies that control the use, modification, and distribution of copyrighted works, as well as systems within devices that enforce these policies.” (source)

Proponents of DRM argue that it is necessary to prevent intellectual property from being duplicated, helps copyright holders maintain artistic control, and ensures continued revenue streams. Conversely, opponents to DRM argue that there is no evidence that it helps prevent copyright infringement, serves only to inconvenience customers, and helps big business stifle innovation and competition. The exemptions will go into effect in 2016 and are up for review and approval again in 3 years. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against […]MORE