Prince and Copyright

Prince and Copyright

Posted by: on June 29, 2017   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news since his untimely passing and two stories of note have emerged in recent months.

The first centers around a fair use debate, similar in nature to a case covered in a previous post about Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a photo as inspiration: The estate of Andy Warhol has filed suit against New York City photographer Lynn Goldsmith as a preemptive strike to protect Warhol’s legacy. According to the NY Daily News, Goldsmith had been expected to file a copyright infringement lawsuit against the estate. Goldsmith alleges that Warhol used a photo she took of Prince in 1981 as inspiration for his Prince Series (created in 1984) without asking permission or crediting her.

The estate argues that Warhol’s appropriation of the photo was transformative enough to be considered new work (therefore, meeting the terms of fair use under U.S. copyright law) and allege Goldsmith’s objective is extortion. Estate lawyer Luke Nikas stated in court documents that, “Although Warhol often used photographs taken by others as inspiration for his portraits, Warhol’s works were entirely new creations. As would be plain to any reasonable observer, each portrait in Warhol’s Prince Series fundamentally transformed the visual aesthetic and meaning of the Prince Publicity Photograph.” When asked why she did not pursue legal measures at any point over the past 30 years, Goldsmith said that she was only made aware of the pieces in 2016, when Condé Nast published a special issue called The Genius of Prince. The estate counters that she knew of the pieces as far back as 1984, when she granted permission to Vanity Fair to publish one of them.

Prince’s image isn’t the only thing sparking debate – his catalog of work is, as well. While his Warner Bros. music catalog was released earlier this year to digital streaming platforms, his videography remains largely inaccessible to the public due to copyright disputes. Will his full videography eventually be made available? And further, will the public ever gain access to the material in his Paisley Park estate’s storied vault? It’s been speculated that nearly all contents of the vault lack thorough rights contracts.

Prince’s estate has been in flux for some time, as it’s battled to resolve contractual disputes over copyright issues with Warner and Universal. Since his passing in April 2016, various issues involving copyright have arisen. The public’s collective hope is for speedy resolution to copyright matters so all may freely access his work. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news since his untimely passing and two stories of note have emerged in recent months. The first centers around a fair use debate, similar in nature to a case covered in a previous post about Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a […]MORE

Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection Releases Hundreds of Digitized Images

Posted by: on April 21, 2017   |Comment (1)|Digital Asset Management

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. New pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s personal archive. Adler served as director of publicity for Def Jam Records and Rush Artist Management from 1984-1990, where he worked alongside producers Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons during an era when the label released notable albums by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys, Slick Rick, Run-DMC, EPMD, and De La Soul. Cornell’s curator of rare books and manuscripts, Katherine Reagan, comments that, “Bill’s files are a rich and deep resource for the study of hip-hop’s emergence in the popular press and as a force within the music industry, and they enrich our understanding of hip-hop’s 40-year history.”

The Hip Hop Collection is part of the Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. They received Adler’s archive in 2013 and the newly added pieces represent only 5 percent of the full archive. The rest can be seen in person at the library, for now; they plan to digitize the rest of Adler’s archive over the next few years. The most recent batch includes over 1700 images. Adler started collecting in the 70s, when there were few resources about hip-hop and the internet did not exist. “But there was a tremendous explosion of writing about hip-hop in real time,” he said. “I’m thrilled to know that the collection is going to be made available to anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection, anywhere in the world.” (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. New pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s […]MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available this month for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative (in partnership with Wikimedia Commons) and enables users to access photos of (a portion of) the Met’s inventory for web viewing and use without copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project. Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available this month for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative (in partnership with Wikimedia Commons) and enables users to access photos of (a portion of) the Met’s inventory for web viewing […]MORE

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Library of Congress's new homepage

The Library of Congress’s new homepage

On Tuesday November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled a redesign of their homepage, which comes as part of a larger redesign of the site currently in the works. On October 27th, the Library’s blog The Signal published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the LOC, wherein she discussed user experience and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative led by Smith and one of its greatest challenges, she says, is that the LOC started sharing their vast amount of content early on the web, using older technologies, and substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions must be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata must be assigned to records. Once the foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to read the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled a redesign of their homepage, which comes as part of a larger redesign of the site currently in the works. On October 27th, the Library’s blog The Signal published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the LOC, […]MORE

Collections as Data 2016 Conference

Posted by: on September 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

CollectionsAsData 1A
On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a Collections as Data conference in Washington, D.C. The conference’s website provided the following description for the event:

“The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.”

Participants had the option of attending the conference in-person or virtually, as the event was live-streamed on the LOC’s YouTube channel. Members of the Digital Publishing Services team attended sessions virtually throughout the day. Sessions were open to the public and organizers asked that attendees use the hashtag #AsData in their tagging. A video recording of the conference has been archived on the LOC’s YouTube channel. For more information about the event, please visit the conference’s website. (Source)

On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a Collections as Data conference in Washington, D.C. The conference’s website provided the following description for the event: “The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The […]MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the […]MORE

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks. They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, in addition to other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it wasn’t until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release […]MORE

The MTV 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

120 Minutes 1995-98 logo

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was a 2-hour after hours alternative music block that featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. The show was canceled without formal announcement in May 2003, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer (the host at the time) and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. 120 Minutes made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011 but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013.

The 120 Minutes archive

The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder (identified as Tyler) and a team of volunteers. It doesn’t present each episode in its originally recorded form; it instead lists guest artists, hosts, and videos by episode and links out to the YouTube versions of all videos featured. Visitors can view listings by year or episode. The site is presented in tiered form, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings and details.

The Cramps in 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (The Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet. The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes but quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was a 2-hour after hours alternative music block that featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. […]MORE

2016 MediaHub Updates

Posted by: on January 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

MHBWIf you haven’t yet heard or made use of Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer: The MediaHub is a multimedia center (located on the first floor of the library), which aims to assist and inspire Providence College’s students, faculty, staff in their digital media-inclusive work. Stationary equipment is located within the space and loanable equipment is available upon request from the Circulation Desk, located next to the library’s front entrance. Specialized assistance is available from the Digital Publishing Services Lab, upon request.

Static equipment includes several high-end iMac computers, equipped with a variety of media hardware and software including iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Audacity, and GarageBand; three lockboxes for equipment, with plexiglass windows and multiple cable knockouts; specialized audio recording equipment; and Epson scanners. Loanable equipment includes video cameras, digital cameras, drawing tablets, green screen lighting kits, portable digital audio recorders, MIDI keyboards, and microphones; and peripherals to aid in use and storage including tripods, external hard drives, memory cards, headphones, and cables. Loanable equipment has a loan time of 7 days. For more information, please visit Digital Publishing Services’ MediaHub webpage, where you can view a comprehensive online catalog of equipment, listing of item availability, image gallery, and tutorials.

If you haven’t yet heard or made use of Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer: The MediaHub is a multimedia center (located on the first floor of the library), which aims to assist and inspire Providence College’s students, […]MORE

Library of Congress Passes New Exemption to Copyright Law

Posted by: on November 25, 2015   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against the theft of intellectual property, and it renews and expands protections for fair use. Request for the exemption comes in reaction to a law that forbids users from breaking Digital Rights Management (DRM), as users often have to circumvent DRM to make full use of their devices. DRM is, “a term referring to various access control technologies that are used to restrict the usage of proprietary software, hardware, or content. DRM includes technologies that control the use, modification, and distribution of copyrighted works, as well as systems within devices that enforce these policies.” (source)

Proponents of DRM argue that it is necessary to prevent intellectual property from being duplicated, helps copyright holders maintain artistic control, and ensures continued revenue streams. Conversely, opponents to DRM argue that there is no evidence that it helps prevent copyright infringement, serves only to inconvenience customers, and helps big business stifle innovation and competition. The exemptions will go into effect in 2016 and are up for review and approval again in 3 years. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against […]MORE

Rolling Stone Magazine Archive Available Now via Google Play

Posted by: on October 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
via Source

Rolling Stone’s digital archive (source)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free, in collaboration with Google Play. The archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and cultural reporting Rolling Stone has generated over time. The archive can be accessed via the Google Play Newsstand app on both iOS and Android devices. Articles by notable writers, including David Fricke, Hunter S. Thompson, and Cameron Crowe, and imagery by Annie Leibovitz and David LaChapelle, are among the content featured. Rolling Stone’s daily news and coverage is available via the app, as well.

Alongside the archive, Rolling Stone has introduced a feature on their website called CoverWall, which offers an immersive experience of the publication’s content, including every iconic cover from their 48-year tenure and extensive archival content. They follow in the footsteps of publications like WIRED and the New York Times with this immersive feature, which is noteworthy, as Rolling Stone was slow to enter into digital format. Gus Wenner, Head of Digital of Wenner Media notes that, “This collaboration is as much about our history as it is our future.” Brian Irving, global head of marketing for Google Play, adds, “Rolling Stone produced some of the most iconic music and political coverage in America for the past five decades. We’re proud to offer this rich history to people for free, where they can explore and interact with every issue… It’s like a highway of information, revisited.” (Sources: 1, 2)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free, in collaboration with Google Play. The archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and […]MORE

Jerry Lewis Archive to be Preserved by Library of Congress

Posted by: on September 17, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Jerry Lewis (source)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; home movies of Lewis at work and play; fully scripted motion pictures produced by Lewis at home; and rare footage of Martin and Lewis doing their nightclub act, among other material.

Lewis himself will be present to perform at the opening event, “An Evening with Jerry Lewis”, on October 9th at Culpeper’s State Theatre. The Packard Campus houses collections for other comedians as well, including Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, and Sid Caesar. For more about the Library of Congress’s collections, please visit loc.gov. (Sources: 1, 2)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; […]MORE

Andy Warhol Became First Modern Digital Artist 30 Years Ago this July

Posted by: on July 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

warhol-debbie-harryAccording to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a portrait of Debbie Harry, of the band Blondie, and essentially created a new form of modern art. According to Burmon, Warhol’s interest in computer graphics could be traced back to an introduction to them (alongside Keith Haring) by Steve Jobs at Sean Lennon’s ninth birthday party, which happened less than a year before the Amiga 1000 presentation. To learn more about Warhol’s pursuit of digital art, please visit the article here.

According to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a […]MORE

Apple & Google Play Announce New Digital Music Streaming Services

Posted by: on June 24, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

1Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th.

Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in an open letter she penned, accusing the company of intending to stiff artists on royalties during the service’s 3-month free streaming trial period. The company has since reconsidered their decision and announced via Apple Senior Vice President Eddy Cue’s Twitter account that they will compensate artists.

Unlike Spotify, neither service allows the user to select songs playing. Google Play Product Manager Elias Roman says he believes many people will not mind this feature, as consumers are after an effortless experience. The company is relying on the behind-the-scenes work of real people, who hand select and curate available playlists; algorithms only come into play after a radio station based on artist or song has been chosen. Apple’s philosophy is similar: Their service claims to offer an “old-fashioned human-curated music playlist for the digital age,” and Apple’s music chief Jimmy Iovine says that algorithms alone “can’t do that emotional task.”

Subscribing to Google Play allows the user to take their playlists offline (as well as manipulate, edit, and rename them) and to listen without interruption. Apple will be offering their service for free for the first 3 months of use and offers individual and family plans once the trial period ends. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Apple and Google Play both launch their new music streaming services this week. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch June 30th. Apple’s service made news this week after it came under fire — most notably by Taylor Swift in […]MORE

Freegal Service Allows Free Digital Access to Music

Posted by: on May 18, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Untitled-4The Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries announced this week that they will now offer access to a service called Freegal. Freegal, a music service offered through subscribing libraries’ websites, provides free access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. Freegal’s service is provided through Library Ideas, LLC, a company based in Vienna, VA that stocks libraries with digital content and offers services like Freading eBook Service and Rocket Languages, in addition to Freegal.

All that is required to access Freegal is a valid library card with a subscribing library. Free Freegal mobile apps for Apple and Android devices are available through the Apple app store and GooglePlay for cardholders of subscribing libraries. There are limits on number of downloads allowed weekly and stream time daily. While mp3 downloads are restricted by weekly amount, they never expire and can be saved to mobile devices indefinitely. Freegal offers a similarly designed movie service that allows patrons of subscribing libraries access to thousands of movies and shows. For more on the Lubbock and Peoria public libraries’ use of Freegal, please see these articles: Lubbock Freegal, Peoria Freegal.

The Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries announced this week that they will now offer access to a service called Freegal. Freegal, a music service offered through subscribing libraries’ websites, provides free access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. Freegal’s service […]MORE

Spotlight: Dorr Rebellion Site Constitutions

Posted by: on April 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

2Featured on the Dorr Rebellion site is a Constitutions module. The section features links to pdfs of The People’s Constitution and Law & Order Constitution, and a side-by-side comparison of the two. The pdfs are available for download and readable online as searchable documents or available for examination in a page viewer, which has automatic and manual page turning options. Each constitution’s page has on it a detailed summary of information relevant to it written by Dr. Patrick T. Conley, constitutional historian and co-author of The Rhode Island State Constitution: A Reference Guide (2010). An article-by-article comparison is also available on the main Constitutions page. You can view this section of the site here.

Featured on the Dorr Rebellion site is a Constitutions module. The section features links to pdfs of The People’s Constitution and Law & Order Constitution, and a side-by-side comparison of the two. The pdfs are available for download and readable online as searchable documents or available for examination in a page viewer, which has automatic and manual […]MORE

Historic Catholic & Dominican Documents in Digital Commons

Posted by: on February 20, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

thumbnailRecently added to Providence College’s Digital Commons, courtesy of Phillips Memorial Library’s Special Collections, is a specialty section of historic Catholic and Dominican documents, including selections by Pope Benedict XV, Reverend John Proctor, and the Catholic Church. Visit the site to take a look!

Recently added to Providence College’s Digital Commons, courtesy of Phillips Memorial Library’s Special Collections, is a specialty section of historic Catholic and Dominican documents, including selections by Pope Benedict XV, Reverend John Proctor, and the Catholic Church. Visit the site to take a look!MORE

New Digitization Project: John Farrell Sports Scrapbooks

Posted by: on January 14, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

11Digital Publishing Services has recently taken on a new and exciting digitization project: Providence College sports scrapbooks curated by John E. Farrell. Farrell, a Providence College alum and former PC athlete, saved and kept 40 years of newspaper articles related PC sports in bound volumes. The articles span from the 1920s to the 1960s. Over the next few months, Digital Publishing Services, along with help from the department of Special and Archival Collections, who house the volumes, will be photographing and digitizing the volumes for display online. Check our Digital Commons site to see the progress as it is made.

Digital Publishing Services has recently taken on a new and exciting digitization project: Providence College sports scrapbooks curated by John E. Farrell. Farrell, a Providence College alum and former PC athlete, saved and kept 40 years of newspaper articles related PC sports in bound volumes. The articles span from the 1920s to the 1960s. Over […]MORE

The Assisi Institute Journal

Posted by: on November 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

45398528c7d715dd1ce4728e426441efNew to Providence College’s Digital Commons this Fall is the Assisi Institute Journal.

“The Assisi Institute Journal provides a forum for interdisciplinary investigation into the presence and working of psyche in matter, and the influence of archetypal patterns and dynamics in the personal and collective domains of culture and life. Accordingly, the Journal seeks to advance analysis of the ‘psychic fields of experience’ present in clinical and therapeutic settings, organizations (government, business, leadership, scientific, and cultural), artistic, spiritual, and religious practices, and the natural and/or built environment. Of particular importance is the contribution toward a more profound understanding of archetypal patterns as they influence both the proliferation of violence in the world and the establishment of justice and peace in human relations in both local and international communities.” (source)

Please click here to view this new and exciting peer-reviewed journal!

New to Providence College’s Digital Commons this Fall is the Assisi Institute Journal. “The Assisi Institute Journal provides a forum for interdisciplinary investigation into the presence and working of psyche in matter, and the influence of archetypal patterns and dynamics in the personal and collective domains of culture and life. Accordingly, the Journal seeks to […]MORE

Inti Celebrates 40 Years

Posted by: on October 16, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

17This Fall, the Inti journal celebrates 40 years of publication. Inti was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time, for 40 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish literature, creative writing by Latin and Spanish authors, and works of art by visual artists. Phillips Memorial Library will host an exhibit highlighting Inti’s tenure during the month of October – stop by to view and check out the virtual exhibit here!

This Fall, the Inti journal celebrates 40 years of publication. Inti was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time, for 40 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish […]MORE

Shepard Fairey’s Case of Fair Use

Posted by: on September 8, 2014   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use
4

L to R: Andre the Giant Has a Posse (1989), Obama Hope poster (2008), Fairey

In mid-August, my colleagues and I completed a course on Copyright for Librarians & Educators, hosted by Duke University. A topic widely discussed and debated in the lectures and forums was the issue of fair use. Fair use (in U.S. copyright law) is, “the doctrine that brief excerpts of copyright material may, under certain circumstances, be quoted verbatim for purposes such as criticism, news reporting, teaching, and research, without the need for permission from or payment to the copyright holder.” (source)

One of the most intriguing cases of fair use for me is street artist Shepard Fairey’s 2009 court case. Fairey, known primarily for being the artist behind OBEY GIANT, battled in court from 2009 to 2012 with the Associated Press and photographer Mannie Garcia over his transformation of the photograph used to create his Obama Hope print. Fairey ultimately won in court on the issue of fair use but lost on the issue of perjury, as he initially lied about which photo he used as inspiration for his work.

Fairey’s thoughts on the matter were detailed eloquently by him in an article published by the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology called, “Reflections on the Hope Poster Case“. In it, he states his argument for why his work falls under fair use’s terms, saying he used pieces of the photo as raw material to create a heroic and inspirational political portrait, the aesthetic of which was fundamentally different than that of the original photo. On appropriation, he said: “The cultures that inspire me creatively — punk rock, skateboarding, and streetwear (graphics-heavy casual fashion) — all rely heavily on appropriation art, both because they are irreverent cultures, questioning the status quo, and because they are cultures with a rapid metabolism and throw-away mentality.”

As to why he didn’t obtain a license to use the photo, he said: “I intended no disrespect to photographer Mannie Garcia, but I did not think I needed permission to make an art piece using a reference photo. From the beginning, I openly acknowledged that my illustration of Obama was based on a reference photograph. But the photograph is just a starting point. The illustration transforms it aesthetically in its stylization and idealization, and the poster has an altogether different purpose than the photograph does.” (source)

What do you think? Does Fairey’s work fall under the terms of fair use or does he owe royalty money to the Associated Press and Mannie Garcia? For more of his thoughts on the case, take a look at Fairey’s article here.

In mid-August, my colleagues and I completed a course on Copyright for Librarians & Educators, hosted by Duke University. A topic widely discussed and debated in the lectures and forums was the issue of fair use. Fair use (in U.S. copyright law) is, “the doctrine that brief excerpts of copyright material may, under certain circumstances, be […]MORE

Copyright for Educators & Librarians

Posted by: on July 24, 2014   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

2Beginning this week, I along with three of my colleagues will participate in an online workshop held at Duke University and hosted by Kevin Smith (M.L.S., J.D.), Lisa A. Macklin (J.D., M.L.S.), and Anne Gilliland (J.D., M.L.S.).

All three instructors began as librarians and went on to get law degrees in order to better assist schools, colleges, and libraries with copyright matters. The principal objective of their current positions is to help sort out copyright issues that arise in educational institutions and libraries. From their introductory bio on the course’s site:

“In all of these situations, our goal is to help teachers and librarians accomplish their legitimate educational goals in ways that respect copyright and reduce the fear and uncertainty that sometimes hampers creative teaching. As lawyers, we strive to find responsible ways to say ‘yes’ when asked if a new teaching idea or library services can be considered within the confines of the copyright law.”

Over the next four weeks, we will learn about how the history, purpose, and structure of U.S. copyright law is relevant to educators and librarians. For more more information on this course, please visit the course’s website.

Beginning this week, I along with three of my colleagues will participate in an online workshop held at Duke University and hosted by Kevin Smith (M.L.S., J.D.), Lisa A. Macklin (J.D., M.L.S.), and Anne Gilliland (J.D., M.L.S.). All three instructors began as librarians and went on to get law degrees in order to better assist […]MORE

Skullphone: Digital Media

Posted by: on June 12, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

SkullphoneTTDBILSkullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas stations. The intent of his early work was to blend in to existing outdoor advertising, signage, and architecture.

In 2010, he debuted a series called Digital Media, an exhibit intended for indoor viewing, a departure from his outdoor work, at a space called Subliminal Projects. The exhibit explored advertising, government, and private enterprise signage, and the spaces on which outdoor media is displayed – making permanent on panels what is reprogrammable and removable in outdoor space. The paintings were done on polished black-painted aluminum panels, used a grid system of red, blue, and green paint (to mimic LED displays) – and were pointillistic, dislocating when approached. They examined the contradictions inherent in outdoor digital signage. (References: Obey, SH, Skullphone, Wikipedia)

SkullphoneHalfMassImages: Theres 30 Digital Billboards in Los Angeles (top) and Half Mass (bottom) from Digital Media ’10.

Skullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas […]MORE

INTI’s Artists: Mario Toral

Posted by: on May 1, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Each issue of the Inti journal we digitize features artwork by well-known artists. One of the best known is Mario Toral.

Mario Toral Muñoz is a Chilean-born painter and photographer, who at 16 relocated to Argentina before studying as a fine art student in Uruguay and France. He settled in New York from 1973-92, where he established himself professionally by regularly participating in exhibitions. One of his most famous works, a mural entitled Visual Memory of a Nation, is located in the Santiago Metro station at the Universidad de Chile. The massive piece took him 3 years to complete, from 1996-99.

Universidad_de_Chile_8Visual Memory of a Nation, by Mario Toral, Santiago Metro station

You can see Mario Toral’s work, as well as work from other artists, in the pages of Inti. Visit Digital Publishing Services’ Inti issue archive, Inti Gallery, and Inti website to see past issues and find out about new publications.

Each issue of the Inti journal we digitize features artwork by well-known artists. One of the best known is Mario Toral. Mario Toral Muñoz is a Chilean-born painter and photographer, who at 16 relocated to Argentina before studying as a fine art student in Uruguay and France. He settled in New York from 1973-92, where […]MORE

Library E-Faire on April 1st!

Posted by: on March 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

e-faire poster

On Tuesday April 1st, Phillips Memorial Library will host an e-faire on the main level of the library, which will include food and prizes! Stop by from 3-5pm to see what’s new in the world of online resources and enter for a chance to win an iPod shuffle or iTunes gift card. Digital Publishing Services will be there to promote new resources, BrowZine and SelectedWorks. For more info about this event, please click here.

mrtImages courtesy of PML Access Services.

On Tuesday April 1st, Phillips Memorial Library will host an e-faire on the main level of the library, which will include food and prizes! Stop by from 3-5pm to see what’s new in the world of online resources and enter for a chance to win an iPod shuffle or iTunes gift card. Digital Publishing Services […]MORE

Cultural Anthropology Goes Open Access

Posted by: on February 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This week, a prominent journal in anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, has gone open access. Cultural Anthropology is a peer-reviewed academic journal, which covers issues related to theory, research, public dissemination, and ethnography across a variety of perspectives in the field of anthropology. The journal going open access means that it has become freely available to the public without any cost associated. This status will allow for new opportunities in scholarship, communication, and dialogue to occur. The open access movement has arisen in part in protest to the privatization of intellectual work. For more about this development, please click here.

JCA

This week, a prominent journal in anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, has gone open access. Cultural Anthropology is a peer-reviewed academic journal, which covers issues related to theory, research, public dissemination, and ethnography across a variety of perspectives in the field of anthropology. The journal going open access means that it has become freely available to the […]MORE

MediaHub Catalog

Posted by: on September 19, 2013   |Comments (3)|Facilities and Tools

As we continue preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing a catalog of the MediaHub’s inventory for patron use.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase the MediaHub’s static and loanable equipment, along with the specifications and features of each item.

The catalog’s design complements the rest of the branding we have developed for the MediaHub. A printed copy will be available in the MediaHub itself, at the Circulation desk, and online. More to come soon!

As we continue preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing a catalog of the MediaHub’s inventory for patron use.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase the MediaHub’s static and loanable equipment, along with the specifications and features of each item. The catalog’s design complements […]MORE

Digitization Process for INTI

Posted by: on August 8, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

As described in my last entry, digitizing the Inti journal is an ongoing project for DPS. For this entry, I thought we could take an inside look at the digitization process. Here are the steps we take to make the paper journal digital:

1. Remove binding from the journal: We remove the journal’s binding so we can lay the pages flat on the flatbed scanner.

2. Scan pages: We use Microtek scanners to scan the pages. We scan photographs and book covers in color mode and pages that are text-only in grayscale mode, adjusting histogram settings as needed to eliminate bleed-through from ink on reverse sides of pages.

3. Run Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software on the scans: Optical character recognition is a technology that converts image documents into editable and searchable text. We run OCR on our scans using a program called ABBYY FineReader. Once the pages have been scanned by ABBYY, we proofread the text, then export to pdf.

4. Upload to Digital Commons: Once PDFs are created, we upload them to Digital Commons along with associated metadata so they are available for download.

As described in my last entry, digitizing the Inti journal is an ongoing project for DPS. For this entry, I thought we could take an inside look at the digitization process. Here are the steps we take to make the paper journal digital: 1. Remove binding from the journal: We remove the journal’s binding so […]MORE

INTI in Digital Commons @ PC

Posted by: on June 28, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The Inti journal was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time and for 39 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish literature, creative writing by Latin and Spanish authors, and works of art by visual artists.

Digital Publishing Services has been working on digitizing the journal for the past several years. An archive of the digitized issues can be found in PC’s institutional repository, Digital Commons. In addition to the journal archive, DPS has created the Inti Gallery, a collection of photographs and images featured in Inti’s issues. Please take a look and take advantage of being able to view Inti in digital form!

The Inti journal was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time and for 39 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish literature, creative writing by Latin and Spanish authors, […]MORE