Open Access Monographs Coming to JSTOR

Open Access Monographs Coming to JSTOR

Posted by: on November 20, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

jstor-logo

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, UCL Press, and Cornell University Press) are currently available.

“The introduction of this Open Access program is part of our ongoing efforts to expand discovery, access, and use of scholarly materials,” noted Frank Smith, Books at JSTOR Director. “We look forward to sharing what we learn with the scholarly communications community.”

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, […]MORE

Opening the Textbook

Posted by: on October 6, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

oer_survey

A research report was released by the Babson Survey Research Group on July 26, 2016: “Opening the Textbook: Educational Resources in Higher Education, 2015-2016.” Using responses from 3,000 U.S. faculty, the report provides a snapshot of faculty awareness, use and attitudes toward open textbooks. The study seeks to better understand the selection process by faculty for educational materials that they employ in their courses.

REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Most higher education faculty are unaware of open educational resources (OER) – but they are interested and some are willing to give it a try. Survey results, using responses of over 3,000 U.S. faculty, show that OER is not a driving force in the selection of materials – with the most significant barrier being the effort required to find and evaluate such materials. Use of open resources is low overall, but somewhat higher for large enrollment introductory-level courses.

Selecting Teaching Resources:

  • Almost all (90%) of teaching faculty selected new or revised educational materials for at least one course over the previous two years.
  • The most common activity was changing required materials for an existing course (74%), followed by substantially modifying a course (65%). Creating a new course was the least common activity (48%).
  • The most common factor cited by faculty when selecting educational resources was the cost to the students. After cost, the next most common was the comprehensiveness of the resource, followed by how easy it was to find.
  • There is a serious disconnect between how many faculty include a factor in selecting educational resources and how satisfied they are with the state of that factor. For example, faculty are least satisfied with the cost of textbooks, yet that is the most commonly listed factor for resource selections.

Required Textbooks:

  • Virtually all courses (98%) require a textbook or other non-textbook material as part of their suite of required resources.
  • Required textbooks are more likely to be in printed form (69%) than digital. Faculty require digital textbooks in conjunction with a printed textbook more often than using only digital textbooks.
  • Only 5.3% of courses are using an openly licensed (Creative Commons or public domain) required textbook.
  • For large enrollment introductory undergraduate courses openly licensed OpenStax College textbooks are adopted at twice the rate (10%) as open licensed textbooks among all courses.

Licensing:

  • There has been very little change in the past year in the proportion of faculty who report that they are aware of copyright status of classroom content.
  • Awareness of public domain licensing and Creative Commons licensing has remained steady.
  • Faculty continue to have a much greater level of awareness of the type of licensing often used for OER (Creative Commons) than they do of OER itself, and it is clear that they do not always associate this licensing with OER.

Open Educational Resources:

  • Faculty awareness of OER has increased in the last year, but remains low. Only 6.6% of faculty reported that they were “Very aware” of open educational resources, with around three times that many (19%) saying that they were “Aware”.
  • The level of faculty awareness of open textbooks (a specific type of OER) was somewhat lower than that for open educational resources; only 34% of faculty claimed some level of awareness.

Barriers to OER Adoption:

  • The barriers to adopting OER most often cited by faculty are that “there are not enough resources for my subject” (49%), it is “too hard to find what I need” (48%) and “there is no comprehensive catalog of resources” (45%).
  • There has been a decrease in faculty concerns about permission to use or change OER materials, and increases in concerns about the quality of OER and that it is timely and up-to-date.
  • Most faculty do not have experience searching for OER materials and cannot compare the ease of finding OER with traditional materials. Only 2.5% thought that it was easier to search for OER.

Future:

  • The number of faculty claiming that they would use OER in the future (6.9%) is of the same order of magnitude of those already using open resources (5.3%). A larger group (31.3%) reports that they will consider future OER use.

A research report was released by the Babson Survey Research Group on July 26, 2016: “Opening the Textbook: Educational Resources in Higher Education, 2015-2016.” Using responses from 3,000 U.S. faculty, the report provides a snapshot of faculty awareness, use and attitudes toward open textbooks. The study seeks to better understand the selection process by faculty for […]MORE

Vatican Affliate Digitizes 1,600-Year-Old Illuminated Manuscript of the Aeneid

Posted by: on July 25, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.

DVL

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.MORE

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site […]MORE

Hypothes.is

Posted by: on June 16, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and online resources easy for everyone to annotate. Annotations can be used to leave comments on specific lines of text (rather than in a comments section), provide citations, view what other researchers have commented, or take notes for personal use.

Hypothes.is is available as a bookmarklet, a Google Chrome extension, and as an addition to a website. For more information or to get started annotating, visit the Hypothes.is website.

Hypothes.is_logo

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and […]MORE

1,300-Year-Old Writings Inside Later Bookbindings

Posted by: on June 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of the time to cut up and recycle handwritten books from the middle ages following the invention of printing. Thanks to macro x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (MA-XRF), it has become possible to read these older texts used to create 15th through 18th century manuscripts without removing the bookbindings.

Read the full post “X-rays reveal 1,300-year-old writings inside later bookbindings” by Dalya Alberge at The Guardian, US Edition.

bookbinding-16th

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of […]MORE

Open Access Science Research in Europe

Posted by: on June 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. Rebecca’s professional focus is academic libraries, research and research education, and digital publishing. Rebecca will be providing more posts during her internship, so stay tuned!]

Recently, the Netherlands EU Presidency announced that all publicly-funded scientific research in Europe will be published as open access by 2020. They also released The “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science,” a document which lists the goals, steps, and benefits of open access in the sciences.

Releasing scientific research as open access articles will make new research more relevant and available to researchers, as well as interested citizens. Open science “has the potential to increase the quality and benefits of science by making it faster, more responsive to societal challenges, more inclusive and more accessible to new users” (“The Amsterdam Call for Action” 4, 2016). By making these articles freely available, new research can be read as soon it comes out by anyone who’s interested, rather than requiring access through a university after an embargo period or paid access to a single article. Open access in the sciences will also benefit those outside the science field. The Call for Action notes that by making research available to the public, entrepreneurs can use the findings to come up with new products and services.

A link to the full-text of the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science” is provided at European University Association News.

Open Science

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. […]MORE

Europe’s Open Access Champions launches

Posted by: on April 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.

EOAC

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.MORE

Paul Klee’s Notebooks Online

Posted by: on March 11, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.

Klee-Notebooks

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.MORE

Open Library of Humanities

Posted by: on December 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

From About OLH page:

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.

The OLH publishing platform supports academic journals from across the humanities disciplines, as well as hosting its own multidisciplinary journal. Launched as an international network of scholars, librarians, programmers and publishers in January 2013, the OLH has received two substantial grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to date, and has built a sustainable business model with its partner libraries.

All of our academic articles are subject to rigorous peer review and the scholarship we publish showcases some of the most dynamic research taking place in the humanities disciplines today – from classics, modern languages and cultures, philosophy, theology and history, to political theory, sociology, anthropology, film and new media studies, and digital humanities. Our articles benefit from the latest advances in online journal publishing – with high-quality presentation, annotative functionality, robust digital preservation, strong discoverability and easy-to-share social media buttons.

Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

olh-homepage-resized

From About OLH page: The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the […]MORE

Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist (Open Position)

Posted by: on November 3, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

PML_fron_Fall_2015

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development of digital information content and presentation tools and services.

You can review the complete position description, essential duties, position requirement and apply here.

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development […]MORE

Cultural Institutions Embrace Crowdsourcing

Posted by: on October 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

A recent post on the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Blog, The Signal by Mike Ashenfelder takes a look at crowdsourcing’s value to library and cultural heritage digital projects. Citizen volunteers can participate in activities such as analyzing images, creating tags and metadata, subtitling videos, transcribing documents, correcting OCR’d (optical character recognition) text and more. Ashenfelder provides several international examples of digital projects that leverage the power of citizen volunteer participation.

For the complete post click here.

A recent post on the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Blog, The Signal by Mike Ashenfelder takes a look at crowdsourcing’s value to library and cultural heritage digital projects. Citizen volunteers can participate in activities such as analyzing images, creating tags and metadata, subtitling videos, transcribing documents, correcting OCR’d (optical character recognition) text and more. […]MORE

The Happy Birthday song is now, finally, public domain

Posted by: on September 26, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A legal battle spanning two world wars, 8 track to mp3 players is finally over. Warner/Chappel’s lucrative ($2 million a year!) copyright ownership claim is struck down in court.

Happy Birthday

Warner/Chappel will no longer be able to charge royalties to filmmakers, artists, and many other for profit ventures for using the classic Happy Birthday song. Judge King ruled that the original copyright of the song covered only the piano arrangement and not the entirety of the song. This ends a decades long legal battle between Warner/Chappel and independent filmmakers and artists.

Until now, Warner has asked for royalties from anyone who wanted to sing or play “Happy Birthday to You” — with the lyrics — as part of a profit-making enterprise. Royalties were most often collected from stage productions, television shows, movies or greeting cards. But even those who wanted to sing the song publicly as part of a business, say a restaurant owner giving out free birthday cake to patrons, technically had to pay to use the song, prompting creative renditions at chain eateries trying to avoid paying royalties.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-happy-birthday-song-lawsuit-decision-20150922-story.html

 

A legal battle spanning two world wars, 8 track to mp3 players is finally over. Warner/Chappel’s lucrative ($2 million a year!) copyright ownership claim is struck down in court. Warner/Chappel will no longer be able to charge royalties to filmmakers, artists, and many other for profit ventures for using the classic Happy Birthday song. Judge […]MORE

NYPL Now Loaning WiFi Hotspots

Posted by: on August 6, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Tony Marx, director of the New York Public Library, has recently secured funding for a project that will allow the NYPL to offer it’s patrons free Wi-Fi hotstpot devices. Marx has been known for his vision of a more accessible library.

We’re human beings. We’re social animals. Even if you don’t need to come to the library to read a book, people come to the library to be together and to be in inspiring spaces

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/arianna-huffington-tony-marx-nypl_559aca67e4b0759e2b50e20b

Learn more about the Library HotSpot here: http://hotspot.nypl.org/

If you’d like to learn more about Tony Marx, and the NYPL, check out his talk with Arianna Huffington at the Aspen Ideas Festival.

Tony Marx, director of the New York Public Library, has recently secured funding for a project that will allow the NYPL to offer it’s patrons free Wi-Fi hotstpot devices. Marx has been known for his vision of a more accessible library. We’re human beings. We’re social animals. Even if you don’t need to come to […]MORE

Fales Library at New York University acquires Triple Canopy archive

Posted by: on July 22, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The well known New York art journal Triple Canopy has agreed to host it’s archive at the Fales Library at New York University. The journal has been published (mostly online, though some print versions do exist) since 2007. Triple Canopy is a part of Common Practice New York and publishes physical art as well has performances and artist talks.

Browsers update, links rot and standards evolve – often at a rapid pace,” said Ms. Resnick, who initiated talks with the library about the unusual agreement. In an interview, she added: “For digital preservation you really have to be doing it and thinking about it all the time. And we just felt that it was completely beyond our capabilities.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/n-y-u-library-acquires-archive-of-the-digital-art-journal-triple-canopy/

 

The well known New York art journal Triple Canopy has agreed to host it’s archive at the Fales Library at New York University. The journal has been published (mostly online, though some print versions do exist) since 2007. Triple Canopy is a part of Common Practice New York and publishes physical art as well has performances […]MORE

‘Oligarchy’ of publishers

Posted by: on July 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Recently CBC News provided a report on a study published in PLoS One about the academic publishing industry.

Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein and Philippe Mongeon, co-authors of the study found that research publishing houses have typical profit margins of nearly 40%, whereas traditional book and magazine publishers are struggling to stay afloat. Additionally, the study authors found that the five largest, for-profit academic publishers now publish 53% of scientific papers in the natural and medical sciences; and in the social sciences, the top five publishers publish 70% of papers.

Recently CBC News provided a report on a study published in PLoS One about the academic publishing industry. Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein and Philippe Mongeon, co-authors of the study found that research publishing houses have typical profit margins of nearly 40%, whereas traditional book and magazine publishers are struggling to stay afloat. Additionally, the study authors found that […]MORE

DC comics coming to Hoopla

Posted by: on July 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured fashion, waiting to gauge how well they sell in more traditional markets before hosting them in the library.

Hoopla users will be able to borrow 25 of DC Entertainment’s top titles including Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Watchmen, Superman: Earth One, V for Vendetta, Final Crisis and Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Blood. Whether you’re a hardcore comic fan or just want to catch up on some of the best stories DC has ever published, it’s a pretty nice list of graphic novels.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/25/hoopla-dc-comics/

 

Learn more about Hoopla

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured […]MORE

UK Launches First Fully OA University Press

Posted by: on June 21, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

University College London (UCL) announced the launch of UCL Press on June 4, 2015. UCL Press is described as the first fully Open Access university press in the UK. The Press will focus on scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals. Inaugural titles include:  Temptation in the Archives by Lisa Jardine, Treasures from UCL by Gillian Furlong and The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections by Alice Stevenson.

UCLPress

University College London (UCL) announced the launch of UCL Press on June 4, 2015. UCL Press is described as the first fully Open Access university press in the UK. The Press will focus on scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals. Inaugural titles include:  Temptation in the Archives by Lisa Jardine, Treasures from UCL by Gillian Furlong and The Petrie […]MORE

White House Digital Initiative

Posted by: on June 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A number of major U.S. publishers have agreed to work with the White House, and president Obama, on an initiative to expand access to e-books and digital content to low income students. The goal is to provide at least 250$ million in free e-books and to provide library cards for all low income students.

Several major U.S. publishers have agreed to participate, including Simon & Schuster, Bloomsbury, Macmillan, Random House-Penguin and HarperCollins. Also, nonprofits and libraries will be teaming up to produce an app that will be able deliver the digital books. The New York Public library is working with book donation nonprofit Firstbook to develop the e-reader app for these books – many of which are already in the public domain.  (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to-announce-ebook-initiative-for-low-income-students/)

Read more about the initiative here: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to-announce-ebook-initiative-for-low-income-students/

Read the White House fact sheet here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/04/30/fact-sheet-spreading-joy-reading-more-children-and-young-adults

A number of major U.S. publishers have agreed to work with the White House, and president Obama, on an initiative to expand access to e-books and digital content to low income students. The goal is to provide at least 250$ million in free e-books and to provide library cards for all low income students. Several major […]MORE

UT Libraries release Derris collection

Posted by: on April 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to music composed by local folk musicians, as well as slide shows of iconic Smoky Mountain locales.

Read more about the project here  |  View the collection here!

Approximately 4,400 slides and eight reels of 8mm film shot by Derris were donated to UT Libraries. The film footage was first digitized, and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips.

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to […]MORE

Faculty Authors Series: Jessica Mulligan

Posted by: on March 12, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

A brand new interview is now available for your consumption at our Faculty Authors Series site. Jessica Mulligan, an assistant professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College is currently featured. Her book, Unmanageable Care, explores the privatized health care system in Puerto Rico through a number of interviews and participant observations.

Check out Jessica Mulligans page

A brand new interview is now available for your consumption at our Faculty Authors Series site. Jessica Mulligan, an assistant professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College is currently featured. Her book, Unmanageable Care, explores the privatized health care system in Puerto Rico through a number of interviews and participant observations. Check out […]MORE

Providence College’s Digital Commons Celebrates 1 Million Downloads

Posted by: on February 26, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, Providence College’s Digital Commons, an online platform for publishing College scholarship and creative work, reached a milestone. Since its launch in 2007, Digital Commons content has been collectively downloaded more than one million times. To celebrate and highlight meaningful faculty, student and library collaborations, the Digital Publishing Services (DPS) team has created the following video.

 

Recently, Providence College’s Digital Commons, an online platform for publishing College scholarship and creative work, reached a milestone. Since its launch in 2007, Digital Commons content has been collectively downloaded more than one million times. To celebrate and highlight meaningful faculty, student and library collaborations, the Digital Publishing Services (DPS) team has created the following video. […]MORE

Sneak Peak: Army Specialized Training Program Site

Posted by: on January 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

astp-homepage

We’ve been working on a new site designed to allow for the exploration of media related to the Providence College ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program). Users will have access to historical photos, articles, and correspondence relating to PC’s ASTP, dating back to World War II. The collection can be experienced through pre-made exhibits (sorted by media type), or by searching across the entire collection. The site is being built on top of a customized instance of Omeka, and should be live on the library.providence.edu web space “soon”.

Stay tuned for more updates and an announcement when we go live with the site!

 

We’ve been working on a new site designed to allow for the exploration of media related to the Providence College ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program). Users will have access to historical photos, articles, and correspondence relating to PC’s ASTP, dating back to World War II. The collection can be experienced through pre-made exhibits (sorted by […]MORE

Digitally Animated Ugly Christmas Sweater

Posted by: on December 18, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party.

Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.

 

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party. Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.  MORE

Five Key Moments in the Open Access Movement in the Last Ten Years

Posted by: on October 22, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Oxford University Press Logo

This week, the library and information community along with others in academia are celebrating International Open Access Week. In a post on the Oxford University Press (OUP) blog, OUP publisher Rhodri Jackson lists five key open access to research events since OUP’s beginning participation in the Open Access (OA) Movement: 1) Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) converts to OA in 2004/05; 2) the National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandate OA in 2008 to NIH-funded research; 3) Springer buys BioMed Central (BMC) in 2008; 4) Public Library of Science (PLOS) ONE‘s growth in 2007; and 5) The ‘Finch’ Report in 2012, positively impacting OA.

For details on each of the five listed events, see Jackson’s full post here.

This week, the library and information community along with others in academia are celebrating International Open Access Week. In a post on the Oxford University Press (OUP) blog, OUP publisher Rhodri Jackson lists five key open access to research events since OUP’s beginning participation in the Open Access (OA) Movement: 1) Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) […]MORE

TAPAS public launch

Posted by: on September 26, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

 

Untitled-1

 

An exciting project from Northeastern, TAPAS (TEI Archiving Publishing and Access Service), is set to launch publicly October 1st! TAPAS is an open source, low cost, and collaborative repository service for TEI data. Users will have the capability to transform their TEI in a number ways, as well as share their data openly across the service. Digital Publishing Services here at PC was an early adopter, and even participated in beta testing for the system. We are currently working on sharing our Dorr Letters Collection on TAPAS. Stay tuned!

Learn more about the project (and get involved!) here: http://www.tapasproject.org/

    An exciting project from Northeastern, TAPAS (TEI Archiving Publishing and Access Service), is set to launch publicly October 1st! TAPAS is an open source, low cost, and collaborative repository service for TEI data. Users will have the capability to transform their TEI in a number ways, as well as share their data openly across the service. Digital […]MORE

Digital Commons at Providence College Nearing One Million Downloads

Posted by: on July 31, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College is part of a consortium of higher education and special libraries (i.e., Higher Education Library and Information Network / HELIN Consortium). In 2005, the HELIN Central Office, supported by the HELIN Board of Library Directors, was awarded a grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to support implementation of a consortium-wide institutional repository (IR). Grant funds provided that a distinct repository would be created for each HELIN institutional library. Each library’s IR would implement unique institutional domain names and branding.

Digital Commons at Providence College was officially launched on February 14th, 2007. Initially, the repository contained a small set of pre-prints, journals and special collection imaged artifacts. Through ongoing fruitful cross-departmental collaborations, the College can now boast four thousand digital objects in Digital Commons at Providence College representing a wide range of document types–College scholarly output and archival materials.

Digital Commons at Providence College is nearing the one million download mark; that is, collectively the four thousand resources now available will reach one million downloads. The Phillips Memorial Library Digital Publishing Services team will announce when Digital Commons at Providence College reaches one million downloads. Cause for celebration, methinks!

DCHome

The Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College is part of a consortium of higher education and special libraries (i.e., Higher Education Library and Information Network / HELIN Consortium). In 2005, the HELIN Central Office, supported by the HELIN Board of Library Directors, was awarded a grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to support implementation of […]MORE

30 more letters! Working facets! It’s another Dorr Letters site update!

Posted by: on June 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Untitled

 

 

Hello everyone!

I’ve got some great news for those who have been following the Dorr Letters site project. We’ve just finalized the encoding for 30 more letters, uploaded them to the Dorr Letters site, and updated some of the code to allow for faceting not only by date, but now by collection and author!

We’ve added more entries for the contextual “ography” popup content, and squashed a bunch of bugs and glitches!

Check out the new updates here: http://library.providence.edu:8080/xtf/index.xml

Per usual, we are not done with the site. Stay tuned for an updated home page that will be more user friendly and will make more sense of the different Dorr Letter collections!

    Hello everyone! I’ve got some great news for those who have been following the Dorr Letters site project. We’ve just finalized the encoding for 30 more letters, uploaded them to the Dorr Letters site, and updated some of the code to allow for faceting not only by date, but now by collection and […]MORE

Ithaka S+R’s “Sustaining the Digital Humanities”

Posted by: on June 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

IthakaSR

On June 18, 2014, Ithaka’s strategic consulting and research service, Ithaka S+R, published “Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase,” which assesses the role that higher education institutions are playing as faculty and staff continue to create digital resources. With an eye toward value and sustainability, the report casts a wide net, looking beyond just institutionally supported online journals, author-archived post-prints and institutional repositories, to digital collections, portals, encyclopedias, mapping tools, crowdsourced transcription projects, visualization tools, and more.

Read about the report here.
Download the full report here.

On June 18, 2014, Ithaka’s strategic consulting and research service, Ithaka S+R, published “Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase,” which assesses the role that higher education institutions are playing as faculty and staff continue to create digital resources. With an eye toward value and sustainability, the report casts a wide […]MORE

Try DIY, Not Green Or Gold Open Access

Posted by: on May 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Harvey Goldstein and John Bynner, writing in the Opinion section of the UK’s online weekly magazine reporting on higher education news and issues, Times Higher Education, take a very direct approach to the future of scholarly publishing: DIY (Do It Yourself). Goldstein and Bynner find the Green and Gold Open Access approaches unacceptable–both still conceding too large profit margins to commercial scholarly publishers. Goldstein and Bynner believe in time that high-quality publishing tools and academy-controlled journal publishing will “make the gold-green debate increasingly irrelevant.”

For more read their article here.

Harvey Goldstein and John Bynner, writing in the Opinion section of the UK’s online weekly magazine reporting on higher education news and issues, Times Higher Education, take a very direct approach to the future of scholarly publishing: DIY (Do It Yourself). Goldstein and Bynner find the Green and Gold Open Access approaches unacceptable–both still conceding […]MORE

Media Hub site officially launched

Posted by: on April 11, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

http://www.providence.edu/library/PublishingImages/rotator-images/media-hub%20rotator/mediaHub3.jpg

The MediaHub is a campus collaborative space that offers patrons support in creating, editing, and producing a wide range of multimedia, and now it’s website is officially launched!

Check it out here

Get access to Media Hub tutorials, peruse the listing of loanable Media Hub equipment, or take a look at some photos in the image gallery! If you have any feedback or suggestions for the Media Hub site do not hesitate to email them to dps@providence.edu.

 

The MediaHub is a campus collaborative space that offers patrons support in creating, editing, and producing a wide range of multimedia, and now it’s website is officially launched! Check it out here Get access to Media Hub tutorials, peruse the listing of loanable Media Hub equipment, or take a look at some photos in the […]MORE

Party & Society, Dr. Cedric de Leon

Posted by: on March 26, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Party & Society Book Cover

Providence College’s Dr. Cedric de Leon from the Department of Sociology has published his first book, Party & Society, with Polity Press. Dr. de Leon examines the ways in which social scientists and other observers have imagined the relationship between parties and society, offering a succinct and lively analysis that outlines the key thinking in the field. Several weeks ago Chris Machado, Providence College’s Academic Communications Director, spoke with Dr. de Leon to discuss Party & Society–video interview here.

A book launch celebration [see poster below] sponsored by Sociology, Global Studies, and the Office of Institutional Diversity will be held on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. The afternoon launch and celebration will begin at 3:30pm with an author-meets-critics session in Siena 200 followed by a reception at 5:00pm in the Department of Sociology, Howley Hall. To rsvp please email cdeleon@providence.edu.

Party & Society Book LaunchPoster

Providence College’s Dr. Cedric de Leon from the Department of Sociology has published his first book, Party & Society, with Polity Press. Dr. de Leon examines the ways in which social scientists and other observers have imagined the relationship between parties and society, offering a succinct and lively analysis that outlines the key thinking in the field. […]MORE

Hoopla and borrowing digital media

Posted by: on February 27, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

hoopla

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per individual use but allows for unlimited simultaneous access.

The Kansas City library will limit patrons to 12 Hoopla checkouts a month. Each episode of a TV show is one checkout.

But patrons have access to videos for 72 hours, to music CDs for seven days and to audiobooks for three weeks. After the time is up, the material is automatically deleted, eliminating the possibility of late-return fees.

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per […]MORE

Dorr Letters site, big update!

Posted by: on January 17, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

twd1_preview

Do you remember awhile back we posted a sneak peek at some of the upcoming features of the Dorr Letters site? If you don’t, no worries, check it out here. Well, we have finally gone live with those changes!

The Dorr Letters project site now includes:

  • Contextual, informative popups for most persons, places, and organizations within the letters
  • Working date facets, you can now filter letters by the date they were written
  • Working formatting templates, the plain text now mirrors some of the formatting of the actual letters.

Go to the Dorr Letters project site, and check out the updates!

Do you remember awhile back we posted a sneak peek at some of the upcoming features of the Dorr Letters site? If you don’t, no worries, check it out here. Well, we have finally gone live with those changes! The Dorr Letters project site now includes: Contextual, informative popups for most persons, places, and organizations […]MORE

bioRxiv: Preprint Server for Biology

Posted by: on December 11, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

biorxiv

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used to introduce the results of new research within a scholarly community for initial review and feedback.

From Science:

BioRxiv, launched yesterday by the nonprofit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), aims to be biologists’ version of arXiv, the popular preprint server where physicists have shared their draft manuscripts for more than 20 years. The goal is to speed the dissemination of research and give scientists a way to get feedback on their papers before they are formally peer-reviewed.”

For more information read.

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used […]MORE

Open Access Button recently launched

Posted by: on November 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser.

“People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it slows innovation, kills curiosity and harms patients. This is an indictment of the current system. Open Access has given us the solution to this problem by allowing everyone to read and re-use research. We created the Open Access Button to track the impact of paywalls and help you get access to the research you need. By using the button you’ll help show the impact of this problem, drive awareness of the issue, and help change the system. Furthermore, the Open Access Button has several ways of helping you get access to the research you need right now.”

Be sure to check out the map to see the breakdown of paywalls across the globe. Hint: zooming in will afford a more granular look at the paywall statistics.

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser. “People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it […]MORE

Archiving Public Broadcasting

Posted by: on November 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The archive will eventually be hosted online and will be freely available to the public.

Read through the Library of Congress’s release here

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald […]MORE

Digitizing Frankenstein

Posted by: on November 7, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Phase one of the Shelley-Godwin Archive has recently launched with digitized versions of all the known manuscripts of Frankenstein. The Archive is the result of institutional partnerships: New York Public Library, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, Oxford’s Bodleian Library, with contributions from the Huntington Library, the British Library, and the Houghton Library—totaling over 90% of all known relevant manuscripts.

Subsequent Shelley-Goodwin Archive project phases will include digitization of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft, “bringing together online for the first time ever the widely dispersed handwritten legacy of this uniquely gifted family of writers.”

shelley-frankenstein

Read More.

Phase one of the Shelley-Godwin Archive has recently launched with digitized versions of all the known manuscripts of Frankenstein. The Archive is the result of institutional partnerships: New York Public Library, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, Oxford’s Bodleian Library, with contributions from the Huntington Library, the British Library, and the Houghton Library—totaling over […]MORE

The Bookless Library

Posted by: on October 24, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Bexar Library

Just recently, the nations first completely digital, e-reader only library opened its doors. While the physical library is ostensibly unnecessary, (the entire collection can be viewed from a home computer or other capable device) the space remains important to the community as many in the Bexar area do not have access to computers and/or broadband internet.

“Our digital library is stored in the cloud, so you don’t have to come in to get a book. But we’re a traditional library in that the building itself is an important community space.” –  Laura Cole, BiblioTech’s special projects coordinator

The idea originated with Nelson Wolff, a Bexar County Judge, who had felt that libraries were lagging behind current technologies. Read more about Wolff and Bexar County Digital Library.

Check out the Bexar County Digital Library

 

Update:

NBC has done a story about the library, here is the video!

Just recently, the nations first completely digital, e-reader only library opened its doors. While the physical library is ostensibly unnecessary, (the entire collection can be viewed from a home computer or other capable device) the space remains important to the community as many in the Bexar area do not have access to computers and/or broadband […]MORE

Dorr Letters Site: Update In The Works

Posted by: on October 16, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Dorr Popups

The Dorr Letters site will be looking a bit differently in the coming weeks. We’ve been at work creating and implementing some new content that will be weaved into each letter. The goal is to allow users the ability to click on the name of a person, place, or organization and be served a quick morsel of information about that person/place/organization. We’re currently working on setting up this workflow for all three information types as well as filling out the content behind the curtains so that none of the popups come up empty!

We took a bit of inspiration from the Colonial Despatches website created by the Humanities Computing and Media Centre, University of Victoria:

Check out their work here: http://bcgenesis.uvic.ca/index.htm

The Dorr Letters site will be looking a bit differently in the coming weeks. We’ve been at work creating and implementing some new content that will be weaved into each letter. The goal is to allow users the ability to click on the name of a person, place, or organization and be served a quick […]MORE

Dorr Rebellion Project Site Highlighted in The Junto

Posted by: on October 10, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03, ’05G and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) and Mr. Russell DeSimone (’67, local historian and collector) recently posted about the Dorr Rebellion Project Site on the early Americanists blog, The Junto. Dr. Chaput and Mr. DeSimone provide beautifully written, content-rich historical context leading up to and surrounding “the constitutional crisis that erupted in Rhode Island in 1841-1842.” The Dorr Rebellion Project Site is the resulting collaboration of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons (Providence College), Dr. Erik Chaput and Mr. Russell DeSimone.

Junto

View Dr. Chaput and Mr. DeSimone’s post here.

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03, ’05G and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) and Mr. Russell DeSimone (’67, local historian and collector) recently posted about the Dorr Rebellion Project Site on the early Americanists blog, The Junto. Dr. Chaput and Mr. DeSimone provide beautifully written, content-rich historical context leading up to and surrounding […]MORE

Letters of 1916: Creating History

Posted by: on October 4, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Trinity College Dublin has launched what it is calling “the first public humanities project in Ireland.” The Letters of 1916 project is crowd-sourcing digital history through public engagement and community collection building to commemorate the centenary of the Easter Rising (1 November 1915 – 31 October 1916). Community members are being invited to participate in the project by uploading private letters and photographs dating from the period.

LettersProject1916

For more details see Letters of 1916: Creating History.

Trinity College Dublin has launched what it is calling “the first public humanities project in Ireland.” The Letters of 1916 project is crowd-sourcing digital history through public engagement and community collection building to commemorate the centenary of the Easter Rising (1 November 1915 – 31 October 1916). Community members are being invited to participate in […]MORE

Library Spaces

Posted by: on September 5, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Hello all,

This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the pipeline like tying in space requesting, video tours, and possibly an interactive floor plan. The site is still in very early development, we’re hoping we can get something up and published before the semester is over, maybe even before October hits. Hopefully!

 

If you’re interested in some of the inspiration behind our Library Spaces site, check out some of our favorites below:

http://libraries.mit.edu/study/ – MIT’s setup is super clean and functional, they’ve managed to fit all of the important information about a space into a neat little block of content. I like the use of icons here as well.

http://www.library.ucsf.edu/services/computing – UCSF breaks down their spaces by function, which I think is super handy for students who need to get something done in the library but might not know exactly where to go to do it.

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/learningspaces – NCSU has a great multimedia component complementing their spaces page(s). Nice pictures and a slick gallery highlight the spaces nicely.

Hello all, This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the […]MORE

Studio Art Majors: Student Work Collection

Posted by: on August 28, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Department of Art and Art History and the Phillips Memorial Library have been collaborating on an exciting project this summer—the creation of a digital collection representing Providence College Art Studio students’ work, presented at student senior shows. Each year, images from senior shows in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture will be added to the evolving collection, reflecting a diversity of intellectual, creative expression and of formats from Providence College Art Studio students. To view the collection, visit Studio Art Majors: Student Work.

StudioArtistsPC

The Department of Art and Art History and the Phillips Memorial Library have been collaborating on an exciting project this summer—the creation of a digital collection representing Providence College Art Studio students’ work, presented at student senior shows. Each year, images from senior shows in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture will be […]MORE

Dorr Rebellion site update!

Posted by: on August 21, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Thomas Wilson Dorr

Hello all!

I had mentioned awhile back that the Dorr Rebellion site would be getting a bit of a facelift. Well, after a few meetings and some brainstorming, I present, the new, updated Dorr Rebellion site! The architecture has been optimized to highlight some of the newer Dorr Rebellion project developments and we’ve added a cleaner solution for the videos in the gallery as well as a dynamically generated updates page!

Check it out!

Hello all! I had mentioned awhile back that the Dorr Rebellion site would be getting a bit of a facelift. Well, after a few meetings and some brainstorming, I present, the new, updated Dorr Rebellion site! The architecture has been optimized to highlight some of the newer Dorr Rebellion project developments and we’ve added a […]MORE

3D printing starting to catch on in libraries

Posted by: on August 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

3d printer in action

Libraries are beginning to offer, for a fee and a bit of training, access to 3d printing. The LA Times has recently published an article about 3d printing and some of the libraries that are beginning to venture into offering 3d printing services. Check out the article here: http://lat.ms/1exwWnV

One of the pioneer libraries offering 3d printing is the Cleveland Public Library, check out their 3d printer info page here: http://bit.ly/1cOg4wE

 

 

Libraries are beginning to offer, for a fee and a bit of training, access to 3d printing. The LA Times has recently published an article about 3d printing and some of the libraries that are beginning to venture into offering 3d printing services. Check out the article here: http://lat.ms/1exwWnV One of the pioneer libraries offering […]MORE

The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion by Dr. Erik Chaput

Posted by: on August 6, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03 alum and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) has published, The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion.” Through his engaging narrative, Dr. Chaput shows the Dorr Rebellion as a critical moment of American history leading up to the Civil War. The rebellion was the only revolutionary republican movement in the antebellum period that claimed the people’s sovereignty as the basis for the right to alter or abolish a form of government.

You can read a complete summary of The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion” and reviews at the University Press of Kansas Website, here.

chapeo

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03 alum and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) has published, The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion.” Through his engaging narrative, Dr. Chaput shows the Dorr Rebellion as a critical moment of American history leading up to the Civil War. The rebellion was […]MORE

Dissertation Embargo Debate

Posted by: on August 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

During their June 2013 meeting, the American Historical Association drafted a statement on policies regarding best practices for history PhD dissertation embargoes. The recent release of that policy statement, which recommends allowing for an embargo period of as much as six years, generated reactions on both sides of the debate. Last week, a post on the Harvard University Press Blog titled, “Can’t Find It, Can’t Sign It: On Dissertation Embargoes” provided a balanced view on the issue.

During their June 2013 meeting, the American Historical Association drafted a statement on policies regarding best practices for history PhD dissertation embargoes. The recent release of that policy statement, which recommends allowing for an embargo period of as much as six years, generated reactions on both sides of the debate. Last week, a post on the […]MORE

Fred Friend on the state of Open Access: Where are we, what still needs to be done?

Posted by: on July 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

Independent journalist Richard Poynder has been conducting interviews with leaders, thinkers, and practitioners of the Open Access Movement for some time (list of interviews dating back to 2001). Recently, Poynder spoke with Fred Friend, librarian, committed advocate for Open Access and attendee at the 2001 meeting that led to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), where the term Open Access was coined and defined. Friend has also worked for the UK organization JISC, and has recently undertaken consultancy work for the European Commission and for Knowledge Exchange.

Interview excerpts:

What in your view have been the major achievements of the OA movement since you helped draft the definition of OA in Budapest in 2001?

I am continually amazed by the fact that the concept of open access to publicly-funded research outputs, as we drafted in the Initiative, is now on the agenda of governments and funding agencies across the world.

We proved to be the “butterfly effect” that has led to the winds of change blowing through scholarly communication, not because we planned it that way but because what we proposed in the BOAI chimed with the until then unexpressed hopes of hundreds of thousands of researchers to use the Internet in ways which benefit human society.

What are your expectations for OA in 2013?

Obviously more growth in OA content and commitment, but perhaps even more important are the stories we are beginning to hear of the value of sharing research and teaching resources freely across the world.

Open access is good in itself, but the real benefit from the ability of researchers, teachers and learners to share content without financial, legal or technical barriers lies in the intellectual, economic and social growth which results from that sharing.

Click here for the complete Fred Friend interview.

Independent journalist Richard Poynder has been conducting interviews with leaders, thinkers, and practitioners of the Open Access Movement for some time (list of interviews dating back to 2001). Recently, Poynder spoke with Fred Friend, librarian, committed advocate for Open Access and attendee at the 2001 meeting that led to the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), where […]MORE

Check out Shelf.io

Posted by: on July 11, 2013   |Comments (2)|Spotlights

Shelf.ioThe folks over at the Harvard Innovation Lab have created a very interesting tool/website called Shelf.io. What is shelf.io exactly? Well, it is, essentially, a collection of shelves. Shelves that are initially empty, but can be filled with all of your favorite things (bookmarks, books, media, just about anything). These shelves can be made public for all the internet to see, or private so that only you can see.

Shelf.io was created using the StackView jQuery plugin and is open source under the MIT and GPL licenses. If you’re feeling up to editing up your own version of Shelf.io grab the github code here.

I’ve started up my own personal Shelf.io at shelf.io/marcmestre. I’ve got two shelves that I’m working on currently, one is a showcase of all of the interesting Digital Publishing Services projects we’re working on, and the other is a collection of links to useful resources that I use a lot in my work. Check them both out! And while you’re at it, get your own shelf.io and start organizing some shelves of your own!

The folks over at the Harvard Innovation Lab have created a very interesting tool/website called Shelf.io. What is shelf.io exactly? Well, it is, essentially, a collection of shelves. Shelves that are initially empty, but can be filled with all of your favorite things (bookmarks, books, media, just about anything). These shelves can be made public […]MORE

Charles Darwin / Joseph Hooker Correspondence

Posted by: on June 18, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

1,200 letters between Charles Darwin and Joseph Hooker, 300 of which have not been published before, are being made available in more than 5,000 images by Cambridge’s Digital Library (http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/). Their decades of correspondence include Darwin’s most famous letter, where he first reveals not only that he thinks species change, but also that he has worked out a completely new theory as to how.

“No single set of letters was more important to Darwin, or is more important now, than those exchanged with Hooker over 40 years.” — Alison Pearn

Darwin

For more information, and links to selected letters see: http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/darwin-hooker-letters.

1,200 letters between Charles Darwin and Joseph Hooker, 300 of which have not been published before, are being made available in more than 5,000 images by Cambridge’s Digital Library (http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/). Their decades of correspondence include Darwin’s most famous letter, where he first reveals not only that he thinks species change, but also that he has […]MORE

Dorr Letters and XTF

Posted by: on June 7, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

http://library.providence.edu:8080/xtf/icons/default/dorrlogo.jpg

Just recently, Digital Publishing Services finished a semester long endeavor to put together a website with the purpose of sharing both the digital transcriptions and the original scans of the Dorr letters. The site is built on XTF (eXtensible Text Framework), which is a free, open source platform that provides a super customizable framework for working with the transforming and display of TEI (and many other encoding languages). The beauty of XTF lies within it’s text indexer tool, it automatically creates an index of your documents which then allows for search-ability across the entire collection, or within each document. XTF can be a bit daunting to learn for a newcomer as there are very many moving parts, that said I’d still recommend it, there are a number of helpful tutorials and documentation and the XTF community is strong and usually quick to help. If you’re working with XTF I’d suggest joining the XTF User List on Google groups immediately!

At present the project includes digital transcriptions of thirty letters from the Dorr Correspondence files in the Sidney S. Rider Collection at the John Hay Library (Brown University), the James Fowler Simmons Papers at the Library of Congress, the Gilder Lehrman Institute, and one letter from the private collection of Richard Slaney. These letters illustrate aspects of race, reform, antislavery and proslavery politics, and, of course, the Dorr Rebellion.

To see our XTF implementation in action, visit the Dorr Letters project page. You can browse or search through the Dorr letters. Once on a letter page you can then click “view page #” to see the original scan of that page. There also exists an option to view the raw TEI.

The letters were selected, edited, and transcribed from the original manuscripts by Dr. Erik J. Chaput and Russell DeSimone, with the assistance of Dr. Edward E. Andrews.

The letters were encoded by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons Digital Publishing Services team including Deborah Angelo, Mark Caprio, Rachel Golub, Christiane Marie Landry, Marc Mestre, and  Hailie Posey.

Also, be sure to visit the Dorr Rebellion project page to learn more about the Dorr Rebellion. The site was recently updated with lesson plans created specifically for interaction with the Dorr Letters site. We will be doing some more updating to the site later this summer, so be sure to check back in.

Project questions or comments may be sent to dps@providence.edu

Just recently, Digital Publishing Services finished a semester long endeavor to put together a website with the purpose of sharing both the digital transcriptions and the original scans of the Dorr letters. The site is built on XTF (eXtensible Text Framework), which is a free, open source platform that provides a super customizable framework for […]MORE

Inti Web: Inti 75-76 Coming Soon!

Posted by: on May 3, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

inti_logo
Inti: Revista de la Literatura Hispánica is a 39 year old academic journal started by Roger Carmosino. It has published research and analysis in all areas of Spanish and Latin literature and has often included creative writing written by Latin and Spanish authors and artists.

I’ve worked with my fellow Digital Publishing colleagues and Roger to revamp the Inti website that was originally created by web dev guru Chris Gubata. The goal of Inti web is to act as a digital extension of the themes surrounding each issue of Inti. We try to keep it up to date with pertinent links to multimedia (photos and videos), news articles, and interviews. The site is, by default, set to be viewed in Spanish, but not to worry, if you can’t habla Espanol, there is a handy toggle up at the top of the site that will automatically translate the page into English for you.

Check out Inti web here:
http://library.providence.edu/dps/publications/inti/

Check out the site for the latest issue of Inti (73-74) here:
http://library.providence.edu/dps/publications/inti/inti-73-74/index.php

Stay tuned for new updates as we finalize the content for Issue 75-76!

Inti: Revista de la Literatura Hispánica is a 39 year old academic journal started by Roger Carmosino. It has published research and analysis in all areas of Spanish and Latin literature and has often included creative writing written by Latin and Spanish authors and artists. I’ve worked with my fellow Digital Publishing colleagues and Roger […]MORE

Digital Public Library of America Launches!

Posted by: on April 18, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) launched a beta of its discovery portal today, delivering millions of freely available materials found in American archives, libraries, museums, and cultural heritage institutions to students, teachers, scholars, and the public. Read and discovery more at dp.la.

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) launched a beta of its discovery portal today, delivering millions of freely available materials found in American archives, libraries, museums, and cultural heritage institutions to students, teachers, scholars, and the public. Read and discovery more at dp.la.MORE

Faculty Authors Series: Adrian Weimer

Posted by: on April 10, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The Providence College Faculty Authors Series promotes the breadth and depth of scholarship undertaken by recently published Providence College faculty members through video interviews coordinated by faculty and staff members from the Office of Academic Affairs and the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons.

The interview with Adrian Weimer is currently featured on the Faculty Authors Home Page. Watch her interview there, or here!

The Providence College Faculty Authors Series promotes the breadth and depth of scholarship undertaken by recently published Providence College faculty members through video interviews coordinated by faculty and staff members from the Office of Academic Affairs and the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons. The interview with Adrian Weimer is currently featured on the Faculty Authors Home Page. […]MORE

Journal of Library Administration Editorial Board Resigns

Posted by: on March 27, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

The tweet/blog ‘osphere has been buzzing in recent days about the resignation of the entire editorial board of the Journal of Library Administration. Board members had requested that publisher Taylor & Francis be more aligned with current Library and Information Studies professionals’ expectations with respect to author licensing agreements. Taylor & Francis offered a less restrictive license in exchange for what would amount to an author-paid $2995 article publication fee. The board found this unacceptable and resigned.

You can read more about this at Confessions of a Science Librarian’s blog post, “Journal of Library Administration editorial board resigns over author rights.”

The tweet/blog ‘osphere has been buzzing in recent days about the resignation of the entire editorial board of the Journal of Library Administration. Board members had requested that publisher Taylor & Francis be more aligned with current Library and Information Studies professionals’ expectations with respect to author licensing agreements. Taylor & Francis offered a less […]MORE

Faculty Authors Series: Bob Hackey

Posted by: on March 20, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The Providence College Faculty Authors Series promotes the breadth and depth of scholarship undertaken by recently published Providence College faculty members through video interviews coordinated by faculty and staff members from the Office of Academic Affairs and the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons.

Bob Hackey was the first to be showcased in the Faculty Authors Series. Check out his interview!

The Providence College Faculty Authors Series promotes the breadth and depth of scholarship undertaken by recently published Providence College faculty members through video interviews coordinated by faculty and staff members from the Office of Academic Affairs and the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons. Bob Hackey was the first to be showcased in the Faculty Authors Series. Check […]MORE

Welcome to Digital Publishing @ Providence College!

Posted by: on March 5, 2013   |Comment (1)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing @ Providence College provides information and updates for the Providence College community about developments in scholarly communication, including posts about copyright, policy debates, protocols, platforms and examples of local, national and international innovations in scholarly dissemination and discourse practices. Digital Publishing @ Providence College is managed by staff of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons.

Digital Publishing @ Providence College provides information and updates for the Providence College community about developments in scholarly communication, including posts about copyright, policy debates, protocols, platforms and examples of local, national and international innovations in scholarly dissemination and discourse practices. Digital Publishing @ Providence College is managed by staff of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons.MORE