DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

Posted by: on May 5, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the library’s Special Collections and Archives.

Building off the work done on the Theology Collections Portal, Doctors Illuzzi and Urbano worked to create a digital exhibit, Sons of Providence, through which they could share the archival materials and photographs that had informed their research along with multimedia elements including a documentary made in collaboration with Film Studies Minor Joseph Aiello ’17, an interactive map, and a wealth of photographs and primary documents. The Digital Publishing Services Coordinator supported the faculty as they created the exhibit using the Scalar platform. Two library-owned iPad kiosks configured to present the digital exhibit were installed as part of a physical exhibit in Harkins Hall during the spring of 2017. DPS staff photographed the exhibit and the images are available at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/exhibits_sons_providence/ . Another installation of the exhibit and kiosks will take place in the library in the coming year.

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the […]MORE

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

While the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in […]MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above. It was fun […]MORE

SPARC’s Director of Open Education Visits PC

Posted by: on January 30, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis on Monday, January 23rd.  View the slides from the talk here.

Allen described the current state of the textbook market, described how this is hurting students both financially and academically, and outlines some concrete examples of how open textbooks and OER can mitigate the problem.  The talk concluded with some helpful, concrete steps for librarians and faculty interested in setting the default to “open.”  Suggested steps include: when you can share, do share; change the default- consider using OER first for teaching or presentations, and then explore other options; support faculty as they work to adopt, adapt, and create OER; and, make “open” your mission.  Allen’s talk was attended by a mix of librarians, administrator, and faculty.  The event was recorded and a can be viewed here.

In addition to presenting this talk, Allen also attended a meeting of recipients of the OER mini-grants awarded by the Provost’s office.  Faculty grantees come from Education; Chemistry and Biochemistry; Psychology; and Finance.  The library and the Center for Teaching Excellence will work closely with these faculty as they adapt their syllabi to include OER.  More information on the progress of this initiative will be shared as it develops.

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis on Monday, January 23rd.  View the slides from the talk here. Allen described the current state of the textbook market, described how this is hurting students both financially and academically, […]MORE

Providence College Joins Open Textbook Initiative

Posted by: on November 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative is to reduce college costs by saving students $5 million over five years using openly licensed textbooks and open educational resources (OERs).  In addition to PC, current participating institutions include: Rhode Island College, the University of Rhode Island, the Community College of Rhode Island, Brown University, Bryant University, Roger Williams University, and the New England Institute of Technology.

PC textbooks Here at PC work has begun raise awareness of OERs and open textbooks on campus.  Representatives from the Library teamed up with Assistant Professor of Economics, James Campbell, to provide an introduction to open textbooks at the Center for Teaching Excellence on November 1st.  The presentation covered the basics of OER, information on locating open materials, and open licensing with Creative Commons.  Campbell is using an OpenStax textbook to teach several sections of Microeconomics this semester.  His insights on the experience were extremely valuable.  You can view the slides from the talk here.

Through generous support from the Provost’s Office the Center for Teaching Excellence and the Library are collaborating to administer a series of small mini-grants to support course design and revision projects that prioritize open educational resources (OERs).  Awardees will be selected this month.  Over the spring semester mini-grant recipients will work closely with the Library to incorporate open content into their syllabi for adoption in Fall 2017.

A Steering Committee made up of library representatives from participating institutions will be responsible for implementation of RI Open Textbook Initiative.  Members of the Steering Committee will communicate with the Open Textbook Network (URI, RIC, and CCRI are now member organizations), provide training opportunities around OERs for librarians around the state, and develop instruments for documenting and reporting student savings resulting from the initiative.

The Library’s Digital Publishing Services has been engaged with work around OERs for some time.  We are thrilled about these new opportunities to collaborate with PC faculty around OERs.  For further reading on this subject check out some of our previous here, here and here.

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative is to reduce college costs by saving students $5 million over five years using openly licensed textbooks and open educational resources (OERs).  In addition to PC, current participating institutions include: Rhode Island College, the University […]MORE

Playing with Palladio

Posted by: on October 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters, and trends within data that may be difficult for an individual researcher interacting with the data to see.  Palladio serves as a means of enhancing (not replacing) traditional qualitative humanities research methods.  Data can be mapped, graphed to show network relationships, viewed and faceted as an interactive gallery, and more.  Palladio comes out of Stanford University’s Humanities + Design research lab.

I’m enrolled in an Introduction to Digital Humanities course through Library Juice Academy.  One of my assignments this week requires an examination of Palladio (as well as a similar tool, Google Fusion Tables).  Palladio peaked my interest.  My initial introduction and interaction with Palladio came through the very helpful Getting Started With Palladio tutorial by Miriam Posner.  This tutorial provides clear, easy to follow instructions for uploading data into Palladio and beginning to work with the data tools- definitely check it out.

After completing the Posner’s tutorial I got inspired to apply Palladio to some data we have access to through DPS projects.  I took a few minutes to aggregate data from a couple of different spreadsheets around the Dorr Letters Project.  My data looks like this:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.27.34 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

In less than a minute I was able to create this visualization graphing the “to” and “from” fields:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.26.07 PM

 

 

 

 

And this map showing the origination location for each item of correspondence:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.38.00 PM

 

 

 

 

I’ll continue to play with Palladio and update this post accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters, and trends within data that may be difficult for an individual researcher interacting with the data to see.  Palladio serves as a means of enhancing (not replacing) traditional qualitative humanities research methods.  Data can be […]MORE

Digital Publishing Services Welcomes You!

Posted by: on September 1, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you:

  • scholarly communication and copyright
  • personal digital archiving and digital asset management
  • scanning and digitization
  • media creation
  • journal publishing
  • text encoding and other digital humanities tools
  • graphic design
  • data visualization

For assistance contact dps@providence.edu.  We wish you all the best this academic year!

Phillips Memorial Library, your Finals Week study haven. #pcgrad #gofriars #pc2017 #friargram #pc2019

A photo posted by Phillips Memorial Library (@clubphil_pc) on

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you: scholarly communication […]MORE

Theology Collections Portal

Posted by: on July 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Posey_Image2If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the kiosk according to their research goals.  Options include:

  • Find Scholarly Sources for a Paper (articles, ebooks, specific journal titles)
  • Explore Theology Topics (major religions, Thomas Aquinas, Catholicism and Catholic social thought)
  • Find Bibles and Biblical Commentary
  • Get Research Help
  • Provide Feedback

Kiosk content is presented via a content management system (CMS) called Scalar.  Scalar provides a platform for the creation of rich, digital publications that integrate text and media using a variety of flexible templates.  A signature design element in Scalar is the ability to create multiple narrative paths through a work.  This path functionality made Scalar an ideal CMS for the creation of the theology kiosk content.  Additionally, Scalar presents built-in visualization tools, which allow creators to explore and adjust the relationships between content in different ways.   Scalar is supported by the Alliance for Networked Visual Culture.

You are welcome to explore the Theology Collections Portal online as well as at the iPad kiosk in the library.  Please do contact us with questions or suggestions-  our primary goal is to make the kiosk as helpful as possible for our researchers and your feedback is greatly valued!

 

If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the […]MORE

text analysis with Voyant Tools

Posted by: on May 26, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis.

Voyant logoVoyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for textual analysis.  Using the tool is easy.  Go to the site and link to or upload your text (the system accepts a wide variety of formats including PDF, XML, TEI, and more).  Once you ingest the text or corpus you are presented with a dashboard of visualizations and tools.  Some of the tools built into Voyant include: Cirrus, a word cloud generator; Summary, a helpful overview of the corpus; Mandala, a visualization that shows the relationship between terms and documents; and many more (explore Voyant’s helpful documentation for the full list of tools).  Another great feature is the ability to generate a URL for the entire corpus dashboard or specific visualizations which can then be linked to or embedded into web-based writing.

Voyant Tools creators Stéfan Sinclar (@sgsinclair) and Geoffrey Rockwell (@GeoffRockwell) have also written a book called Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities (2016, MIT Press).  Rusty on your Greek and wondering what “hermeneutic” means, anyway?  So was I.  Hermeneutic means interpretive or explanatory and comes from the Greek “hermenēus,” interpreter.   The book is accompanied by an extremely rich and helpful web site, Hermeneuti.ca, that uses Voyant to visualize and interpret the book’s content while providing examples of how humanities scholars might integrate textual analysis visualizations into their writing.   One interesting example is found in Now Analyze That! in which speeches on the topic of race by Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright are analyzed.

Text analysis has been part of the digital humanities toolkit for some time.  Voyant has been in existence since 2013 and several examples of how it has been used in digital pedagogy are available.  These include Brian Croxall’s (@briancroxall) discussion of using Voyant Tools to analyze Hemingway; an explanation of how Voyant Tools was used to analyze a corpus of runaway slave advertisements in the U.S. antebellum south as part of a digital history course at Rice University; and a recent write-up on ProfHacker.

I decided to play with Voyant Tools using the corpus of correspondence presented on our Dorr Letters Project site.  I zipped up all 61 TEI files, uploaded the zip file to Voyant Tools, and got this dashboard:

Voyant Dashboard

How cool!?  There is a lot to unpack in this data but I’ll highlight a couple of the things that most struck me:

  • the most used words in the corpus are: dorr, letter, constitution and state (I didn’t remove the TEI Header, introductory text, or follow-up questions included in our TEI so what shows up in the dashboard is not just representative of the letter content)
  • the second 30 letters in teh collection were written by “Anti-Dorrites.”  isolating that part of the corpus and then comparing it to those letters written by Dorr might be revealing
  • it would be interesting to select only those letters written by Dorr and analyze the frequency of certain terms to see if patterns arise over time in relation to Dorr’s political views (of course, this is a small corpus so broad generalizations are dangerous)

Voyant Tools is simple to use and extremely interesting- give it a try yourself!

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis. Voyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for textual analysis.  Using the tool is easy.  Go to the site and link to or upload your text (the system accepts a wide variety of formats including PDF, XML, TEI, and more).  Once you ingest […]MORE

DPS Welcomes Elizabeth Schneider

Posted by: on January 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a User Relations Manager and Technical Services Lead.  Elizabeth brings a wealth of knowledge about digital asset management systems and metadata to the department.  In her new role as Digital Publishing Services Specialist Elizabeth will work on digitization projects, assist in the management of our Digital Commons and Islandora repositories, collaborate with faculty in the creation of SelectedWorks pages, and contribute to a variety of cross-library initiatives.  Welcome Elizabeth!

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a […]MORE

#ReCollectingRI: The Dorr Letters

Posted by: on November 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

What does the past mean to you?  What comes to your mind when you think of Rhode Island history?  These questions are at the heart of the #ReCollectingRI project, an effort of the Rhode Island Historical Society to engage all Rhode Islanders with our past.

Here at the Phillips Memorial Library one of our digital collections presents a very interesting glimpse into Rhode Island history.  For that reason, we share our Dorr Letters to #ReCollectingRI.

2015-11-09_1013The Dorr Letters web site currently presents 60 letters written to and from Thomas Wilson Dorr around the time of the Dorr Rebellion in 1842.  The letters present an important glimpse into how this critical event unfolded.  You can view the original manuscripts on the site, or read their transcriptions.  The site also provides contextual information about many of the important peoples and places that show up in the letters.

For more on #ReCollectingRI visit: http://www.rihs.org/recollectingri/ or check out the the hashtag on Facebook and TwitterWhat will you add?

 

What does the past mean to you?  What comes to your mind when you think of Rhode Island history?  These questions are at the heart of the #ReCollectingRI project, an effort of the Rhode Island Historical Society to engage all Rhode Islanders with our past. Here at the Phillips Memorial Library one of our digital […]MORE

Guest Post: Russell Franks on Infrared Photography

Posted by: on November 4, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College. 

PC_infrared_0502Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us with vital subtle clues and information about the world around us.

But there is another part of the light spectrum – infrared light – that we cannot see. We know it exists; scientists quantified it over one hundred years ago, but we can’t perceive it naturally without the aid of specialized recording equipment, such as a camera.

Infrared light lies between the visible and microwave portions (think microwave oven) of the electromagnetic spectrum. It also has a range of wavelengths, just like visible light has wavelengths that reflect the colors red to violet. The “near” infrared light spectrum, which is closest to the color red, is just beyond what we naturally see and “far” infrared is closest to the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

PC_infrared_0183My curiosity in infrared photography began during my analog camera days. In the pre-digital world infrared imaging required infrared sensitive film, an infrared filter for the camera lens, and a complicated focusing method since light in the infrared range focuses differently than the visible light we normally see.

However, my fascination with infrared imagery deepened upon realizing infrared photography extended the perception of my reality and my understanding in that there is more to see than what we actually see. The sense of other worldliness that infrared imagery suggests stretches the logic of my imagination in how I see mankind and nature interact with each other. This “through the lens” altered perception has even invaded my daily life. Every day I am confronted with various scenes that beg to be photographed in infrared to magically reveal the unseen play of light. This is just one part of nature I seek to explore through the medium of the lens.

As an artist, the infrared journey has been filled with surprise, frustration, and immense satisfaction, but more importantly this unveiling of the unseen natural world to the naked eye has permanently changed how I visually perceive my surroundings.

In the days of analog photography, infrared imagery was usually thought of as a specialized art form reserved for professionals. However, with the advent of digital photography, infrared imaging has become much easier and less expensive in the long run – not to mention a lot more FUN! True, having your digital camera converted for a few hundred dollars to “see” the infrared spectrum might be considered extravagant, but well worth it if you want to view the world – literally – in a different light.

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College.  Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us […]MORE

U.S. Department of Education to Hire Open Education Adviser

Posted by: on October 8, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources
OER image

adapted from an image by Kevin Mearso posted on the Open Knowledge Flickr stream

Open educational resources (OERs) are teaching, learning, and research resources that are freely available for re-use (and often remixing).  OERs come in a variety of formats including course materials or modules, textbooks, videos, assessment tools, or digital exhibits.  There are several growing repositories of OERs including: OER Commons and MERLOT.

As OERs become more widely available they are gaining currency as worthwhile teaching tools that present cost savings to schools and students.  The U.S. Department of Education recently announced that they will hire and open education adviser.  The adviser will work to connect educators from both K-12 schools and higher ed with OERs that can be integrated into their curricula.

Read the Department of Ed press release here

Open educational resources (OERs) are teaching, learning, and research resources that are freely available for re-use (and often remixing).  OERs come in a variety of formats including course materials or modules, textbooks, videos, assessment tools, or digital exhibits.  There are several growing repositories of OERs including: OER Commons and MERLOT. As OERs become more widely […]MORE

Welcome Fall 2015!

Posted by: on September 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Greetings, and welcome (or welcome back) to campus.  We are very glad to see you!  Below you’ll find a couple of quick pointers to help you start the semester off smoothly.

original photo from flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dLJU1F

original photo from flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dLJU1F

Get Help Fast

Need a book?  Have a research question?  Need access to an article?  You can reach a librarian quickly via:

text: 401-484-7004

email: askalibrarian@lists.providence.edu

phone: 401-865-1993

DPS Can Help

DPS stands for Digital Publishing Services.  We are a department within the library that can assist you with the following:

  • scanning and digitization
  • multimedia creation (including software tutorials and/or access to hardware such as video cameras, microphones, etc.)
  • information about Digital Commons, PC’s institutional repository
  • consultation around how to integrate digital humanities methodologies into your research

For help with any of the above leave a comment below or contact us at dps@providence.edu.  Wishing you a great semester!

Greetings, and welcome (or welcome back) to campus.  We are very glad to see you!  Below you’ll find a couple of quick pointers to help you start the semester off smoothly. Get Help Fast Need a book?  Have a research question?  Need access to an article?  You can reach a librarian quickly via: text: 401-484-7004 […]MORE

Providence College Army Specialized Training Program Site Now Live

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/.

astp

PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) for leadership roles within the Army during World War II.  During the program’s short tenure over 500 soldiers from around the country lived and took classes at Providence College. The ASTP Program was important to Providence College as it kept enrollments up during the war. The program concluded nationally when soldiers were needed on the battlefields of Europe as war efforts increased.

PC’s ASTP collection includes video, photographs, correspondence, newspaper coverage, archival materials, and more.  While the site remains a work in progress in terms of organization and curation, it is complete in terms of presenting digitized content.  Please explore the collection and let us know if you have thoughts or feedback using the commenting feature on each item’s page, or be emailing us at dps@providence.edu.  We are especially interested in identifying individuals pictured in the collection photographs.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/. PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) […]MORE

New Journal: Sociology Between the Gaps

Posted by: on March 5, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share that our newest journal collaboration has launched.  Sociology Between the Gaps is a new, innovative, peer-reviewed, open-access, cross-disciplinary, independent online journal being published using the Digital Commons platform.  The journal also aims to reflect the intersections of social class, race, gender, age, and cross-disciplinary views by encouraging sociologists and professionals in related fields to submit work on topics that cross disciplinary boundaries and/or areas of specialization but effectively link disciplines to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective on the topics addressed.  The first issue, Adoption and Families: National and International Perspectives, is currently open for submissions.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share that our newest journal collaboration has launched.  Sociology Between the Gaps is a new, innovative, peer-reviewed, open-access, cross-disciplinary, independent online journal being published using the Digital Commons platform.  The journal also aims to reflect the intersections of social class, race, gender, age, and cross-disciplinary views by encouraging sociologists […]MORE

PC’s Digital Commons Reaches 1 Million Downloads!

Posted by: on January 8, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access
photo by flickr user ludovik

photo by flickr user ludovik available here

It’s official, Providence College’s Digital Commons has reached 1 Million Downloads!

Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository, a place for faculty and students to publish their scholarly and creative work on the web. Managed by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons, the repository was launched in 2007. Digital Commons now hosts over 4,000 items, which have been downloaded over one million times!

To learn more about Digital Commons at PC, check out this post.  Now, for the party hats and confetti!

 

 

 

It’s official, Providence College’s Digital Commons has reached 1 Million Downloads! Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository, a place for faculty and students to publish their scholarly and creative work on the web. Managed by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons, the repository was launched in 2007. Digital Commons now hosts over 4,000 items, […]MORE

Need a diversion during finals? Try the Inspirograph

Posted by: on December 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Feeling a little overwhelmed this week?  We hear you!  Here’s a suggestion for a little diversion: the Inspirograph, a digital version of the classic, analog, Spirograph toy.

inspiro 2

To use the Inspirograph, simply select either a fixed or rotating gauge in any of the sizes available and start making your spirals.  You can select different pen and background colors using the preset selections or choosing your own.  Here’s a look at my creation:

inspiro

Once you’ve completed a design, you can download it or submit it to a gallery full of designs by other users.  Trust me, this is addictive.

I discovered the Inspirograph via the Co.Design blog. Try it our yourself!

 

Feeling a little overwhelmed this week?  We hear you!  Here’s a suggestion for a little diversion: the Inspirograph, a digital version of the classic, analog, Spirograph toy. To use the Inspirograph, simply select either a fixed or rotating gauge in any of the sizes available and start making your spirals.  You can select different pen […]MORE

Data Viz Exploration: the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards

Posted by: on October 31, 2014   |Comment (1)|Spotlights

Here in DPS we are just starting to get our feet wet in the world of data visualization.  Is this a new topic for you too?  Well, to help you gain an understanding of the power of data visualization, we suggest checking out the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards.  Voting is taking place now for the 2014 Awards, but you can view the list of finalists here.

Here are a couple of my personal favorites from the short list:

 Data Visualizationaftermarket eduction copy:

Aftermarket Education by Beutler Ink

For its annual Education Issue, Popular Science magazine explored the huge uptick in massive open online courses (MOOCs) and tapped us for our data visualization expertise to bring the numbers to life. Using a series of clusters to represent available MOOCs, we showed the number of courses available through 2014 at nine of the largest MOOC providers. Through light-hearted callouts, we suggest possible courses of study a casual student might pursue. The infographic appeared in the September 2013 issue of the print edition.

Infographicceative routines copy:

Creative Routines by RJ Andrews

How do creatives – composers, painters, writers, scientists, philosophers – find the time to produce their opus? Mason Currey investigated the rigid Daily Rituals that hundreds of creatives practiced in order to carve out time, every day, to work their craft. Some kept to the same disciplined regimen for decades while others locked in patterns only while working on specific works. “Creative Routines” visualizes a selection of the routines Currey researched.

 

 

 

Interactivewomen in science copy:

Women in Science by FF Function

An interactive tool built for the Unesco Institute for Statistics as part of the International Women’s Day and centered on the theme “Equality for women is progress for all” helps visualize the gender gaps in the pipeline leading to a career in research.

There is much more to explore at the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards site.  Enjoy!

Here in DPS we are just starting to get our feet wet in the world of data visualization.  Is this a new topic for you too?  Well, to help you gain an understanding of the power of data visualization, we suggest checking out the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards.  Voting is taking place now for […]MORE

LC Shares Free, Interactive eBooks

Posted by: on September 17, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources
h ren 1

table of contents for the Harlem Renaissance book

The Library of Congress recently made available six interactive ebooks for use by educators, students, and the public.  The books, referred to as the Student Discovery Set, cover a range of topics including: the Constitution, the Dust Bowl,the Harlem Renaissance, Immigration, Symbols of the United States, and Understanding the Cosmos.  The books are available for the iPad and can be downloaded for free on iBooks.

Each book includes 15-20 primary sources.  Interactive tools let students zoom in for close examination, draw to highlight interesting details and make notes about what they discover.  The end of each book provides a detailed list of citation information for each source, as well as link to it within the Library of Congress collections.

This set is of interest to us in DPS for a couple of reasons.  It serves as an interesting model of publishing content using the iBook format, something we are also currently investigating.  It also demonstrates the power of curating digital collections as open educational resources for use in classrooms.

Visit the LC site to download the books! http://www.loc.gov/teachers/student-discovery-sets/

The Library of Congress recently made available six interactive ebooks for use by educators, students, and the public.  The books, referred to as the Student Discovery Set, cover a range of topics including: the Constitution, the Dust Bowl,the Harlem Renaissance, Immigration, Symbols of the United States, and Understanding the Cosmos.  The books are available for […]MORE

Dorr Rebellion Lesson Plans

Posted by: on August 6, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Did you know that in addition to the documentary, the gallery, and the letters, the Dorr Rebellion Project web site also contains five lesson plans for use in the high school or post-secondary classroom?

The plans can be used independently or combined to form a unit on the Dorr Rebellion.  The lessons cover the following topics:

dorr lesson plans

Each lesson plan is aligned with specific Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics and Social Studies.  All of the lessons require that students to engage with primary source material hosted on the Dorr Rebellion web site.

In May the lesson plans were shared with local K-12 teachers at the RI Social Studies Institute.  Both the lesson plans and the web site generated a lot of enthusiasm from middle and high school teachers.

If you use the lesson plans and have feedback we’d love to hear from you.  You can comment here or email dps@providence.edu.  Happy teaching!

Did you know that in addition to the documentary, the gallery, and the letters, the Dorr Rebellion Project web site also contains five lesson plans for use in the high school or post-secondary classroom? The plans can be used independently or combined to form a unit on the Dorr Rebellion.  The lessons cover the following […]MORE

Spring Publishing

Posted by: on May 14, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

As the semester comes to a close Digital Publishing Services has been busy publishing scholarship from a variety of Providence College conferences, events, and classes.  Here is a selection of the work being added to the repository:

Annual Undergraduate Conference on Health and Society
In its fifth year, this conference attracts submissions from around the country.  Conference presenters are selected through a peer-review process.  This year’s topics included the Affordable Care Act and insurance marketplaces, challenges in contemporary global health practice, and gendered dimensions of health.

Second Annual Cleary Lecture
The annual lecture honors the memory of Rev. Edward L. Cleary, O.P., a professor of Political Science at Providence College for eighteen years and the director of the Latin American Studies program for twelve years.  This year’s lecture, Prospects for Peace in Colombia, was presented by Virgina Bouvier of the U.S. Institute of Peace.  A video of the lecture is available through Digital Commons.

Annual Celebration of Student Scholarship and Creativity
This year marked the fifth Annual Celebration.  We are currently working with several students to publish their scholarship from the event.

Liberal Arts Honors Program
This Spring we are partnering with English faculty Bill Hogan to publish student scholarship from the Liberal Arts Honors Colloquium, Dostoevsky.

As the semester comes to a close Digital Publishing Services has been busy publishing scholarship from a variety of Providence College conferences, events, and classes.  Here is a selection of the work being added to the repository: Annual Undergraduate Conference on Health and Society In its fifth year, this conference attracts submissions from around the […]MORE

Exploring Digital Curation

Posted by: on April 4, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Here in Digital Publishing Services (DPS) we work with digital objects every day.  We scan, process, store, and present a wide variety of digital content in many formats.  We are engaged in aspects of the digital curation process, but we don’t often label it as such.

I set out to locate some introductory resources about digital curation to help me better understand the field.  Here’s a selection of what I found:

DCC Curation Lifecycle Model
DCC Curation LifecycleThe Digital Curation Centre is a UK-based organization that specializes in digital information curation “with a focus on building capacity, capability and skills for research data management across the UK’s higher education research community.”  The Centre presents a wealth of helpful resources on digital curation including How-To guides and case studies.

The DCC presents the Digital Curation Lifecycle Model pictured above.  As someone new to the field, this lifecycle model is a little daunting.  Luckily, I cam across a helpful webinar presented by Lisa Snider and the ALA ACRL Digital Curation Interest Group that broke down the lifecycle model into manageable “pieces of the digital curation pie.”  Lisa outlines the pieces as:

Digital Objects (Data)
Selection and Acquisition
Appraisal
Arrangement and Description
Metadata Creation
Preservation
Migration
Storage
Access

Each of these items deserve more attention, and I’ll expand upon them in further posts.  Lisa’s presentation emphasized that digital curation goes beyond digital preservation.  Preservation is one very important (and often challenging) part of the larger digital curation lifecycle.

I plan to deepen my understanding of this subject through the upcoming MOOC, Introduction to Digital Curation, presented by University College London.  Interested?  Join me!

Here in Digital Publishing Services (DPS) we work with digital objects every day.  We scan, process, store, and present a wide variety of digital content in many formats.  We are engaged in aspects of the digital curation process, but we don’t often label it as such. I set out to locate some introductory resources about […]MORE

Digital Humantites Awards

Posted by: on February 19, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

humanities matter infographicIt’s award season time of year, and we are always interested in the DH Awards!  These annual awards allow the public to nominate and vote on exemplary projects in the digital humanities community.  Here are 2013’s winners:

Best DH visualization or infographic: Infographic – the Humanities Matter

Best use of DH for fun: Serendip-o-matic
“Serendip-o-matic connects your sources to digital materials located in libraries, museums, and archives around the world. By first examining your research interests, and then identifying related content in locations such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Europeana, and Flickr Commons, our serendipity engine helps you discover photographs, documents, maps and other primary sources.”

Best DH tool or suite of tools: Commons In A Box
“Commons In A Box (CBOX) is a free software project aimed at turning the infrastructure that successfully powers the CUNY Academic Commons into a free, distributable, easy-to-install package.” “CBOX takes the complexity out of creating a Commons site, helping organizations create a space where their members can discuss issues, collaborate on projects, and share their work.”

Best DH blog post, article, or short publication: “‘Psychopower’ of Cultural Diplomacy in the Information Age” by Natalia Grincheva

Best DH project for public audiences: Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive
See our post on Our Marathon from November.

Best DH contribution not in the English language: Eä – Revista de Humanidades Médicas & Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología

Explore more and learn about the runners up at: http://dhawards.org/dhawards2013/results/ or on Twitter @dhawards

It’s award season time of year, and we are always interested in the DH Awards!  These annual awards allow the public to nominate and vote on exemplary projects in the digital humanities community.  Here are 2013’s winners: Best DH visualization or infographic: Infographic – the Humanities Matter Best use of DH for fun: Serendip-o-matic “Serendip-o-matic […]MORE

Happy New Year

Posted by: on January 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Happy New Year from the Digital Publishing Services Team!  For us, the new year has meant welcoming a new team member – Stephen Mattos.  Stephen has extensive digitization experience and photography skills.  Most recently, Stephen worked at Roger Williams University where he was the Digital Imaging Specialist in the Architecture Library.  He focused on the digitization and archiving of their slide collection.  We welcome Stephen and look forward to working with him.

There are lots of exciting projects on our horizon for Spring 2014, including:

  • an update to the Dorr Letters Project
  • further collaboration with Special Collections and Archives on digitization projects including digitization of the Army Specialized Training Program collection
  • launch of the Art Journal in Digital Commons, a journal created and edited by PC Art History and Studio Art students
  • continued development of the MediaHub
  • and much more!

We will highlight many of these projects here on the Digital Publishing @ PC Blog.  Hope to see you again soon!

 

 

Happy New Year from the Digital Publishing Services Team!  For us, the new year has meant welcoming a new team member – Stephen Mattos.  Stephen has extensive digitization experience and photography skills.  Most recently, Stephen worked at Roger Williams University where he was the Digital Imaging Specialist in the Architecture Library.  He focused on the […]MORE

Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive

Posted by: on November 19, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A team from Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Net­works  (a research center for Dig­ital Human­i­ties and Com­pu­ta­tional Social Sci­ence) has devel­op­ed an extensive, crowd-sourced, dig­ital archive fea­turing sto­ries, photos, videos, oral his­to­ries, social media, and other mate­rials related to the Boston Marathon bomb­ings that took place on April 15, 2013.  The archive “will allow the public to explore not only what happened during the event, but also how the event was experienced by Bostonians, visitors to the city, and those many members of the Boston diaspora who were far away but deeply engaged in the unfolding events. The archive will serve as a long-term memorial, preserving these records for students and researchers, providing future historians with invaluable, local windows into an important national event.”

Explore the Our Marathon site or learn more on Twitter @OurMarathon

Screen Shot 2013-11-19 at 12.11.20 PM

A team from Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Net­works  (a research center for Dig­ital Human­i­ties and Com­pu­ta­tional Social Sci­ence) has devel­op­ed an extensive, crowd-sourced, dig­ital archive fea­turing sto­ries, photos, videos, oral his­to­ries, social media, and other mate­rials related to the Boston Marathon bomb­ings that took place on April 15, 2013.  The archive “will […]MORE

Introducing Digital Commons

Posted by: on July 2, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital CommonsWhat is an institutional repository?

Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository.  Well, what does institutional repository mean, and why is having one useful for an academic community?

Scholar Raym Crow defines institutional repositories (IRs) as, “digital collections that preserve and provide access to the intellectual output of a single or multi-university community”  (Crow, 2002 SPARC position paper, “The Case for Institutional Repositories”).

Basically, an IR is a place where scholarship written by a given institution’s students, faculty, and staff is made freely accessible online.  IRs are usually managed through an institution’s library.  IRs expand access to research, increase the institution’s visibility online, and provide long-term preservation of the institution’s digital scholarship.

What makes Providence College’s Digital Commons unique?

Providence College Digital Commons Discipline WheelProvidence College’s Digital Commons contains over 2964 records, which have been downloaded a total of 590088 times.  Items include research, scholarship and creative works by Providence College faculty and students in a variety of media and formats including articles, monographs, white papers, proceedings, presentations, theses, artworks, performances, and multimedia products; as well as digitized primary source materials from the library’s Special and Archival Collections.

The content in PC’s Digital Commons comes from a range of academic disciplines.  Click on the discipline wheel image to the right to explore the range of content that’s represented.

What kind of content is added to the repository regularly?

The Digital Publishing Services Department is adding content to Digital Commons all the time.  Here is a selection of items we have added recently:

 Want to publish?  Have questions?

Contact me, Hailie Posey (hposey@providence.edu), with questions about publishing in Providence College’s Digital Commons.

 

What is an institutional repository? Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository.  Well, what does institutional repository mean, and why is having one useful for an academic community? Scholar Raym Crow defines institutional repositories (IRs) as, “digital collections that preserve and provide access to the intellectual output of a single or multi-university community”  (Crow, 2002 […]MORE

DPS Presents on Inti at Conference

Posted by: on June 10, 2013   |Comment (1)|Scholarly Communication

On May 31, 2013 Mark Caprio, Christiane Marie Landry, and Marc Mestre presented Publishing Inti: a Suite of Services Case Study at the first annual Querying the Library: Digitization and Its Impact conference at Rhode Island College.

For more on Inti be sure to check out the Inti web site and the Inti Archive.

RIC Conf Collage Sized for Web

Other presentations at the conference covered: converting EPUBS to PDFS, open access and the institutional repository, the role of the conservator in the digitization program at BC, building digital libraries, using technology to promote active learning, and more.  It was a fruitful and interesting day and we hope to be involved again next year.

On May 31, 2013 Mark Caprio, Christiane Marie Landry, and Marc Mestre presented Publishing Inti: a Suite of Services Case Study at the first annual Querying the Library: Digitization and Its Impact conference at Rhode Island College. For more on Inti be sure to check out the Inti web site and the Inti Archive. Other […]MORE

DP @ PC: Summer Research Edition

Posted by: on May 28, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Isn’t it wonderful how things slow down in the summer?  Often, the summer season allows us to dig into projects and explore interests that have been set aside for more pressing tasks during the academic year.  I tend to make a list of digital publishing tools to research and gain facility with over the summer.  Here are four tools you might enjoy exploring as well:

prismPrism, an effort of UVA’s Scholars Lab, is a tool for collecting and visualizing crowd-sourced interpretations of texts.  “Users are invited to provide an interpretation of a text by highlighting words according to different categories, or “facets.” Each individual interpretation then contributes to the generation of a visualization which demonstrates the combined interpretation of all the users.”  Prism’s creators envision it as a tool for both pedagogical use and scholarly exploration.

 

metadata gamesFunded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, “Metadata Games is an online game system for gathering useful data on photo, audio, and moving image artifacts, enticing those who might not visit archives to explore humanities content while contributing to vital records. Furthermore, the suite enables archivists to gather and analyze information for image archives in novel and possibly unexpected ways.”  For more information, see this interview with Mary Flanagan, one of Metadata Games’ creators.

 

scoop itAccording to the creators of Scoop It, everyone is a publisher.  This tool allows users to curate content from the web around a specific theme or topic.  The pages you can create in Scoop It have an eye-catching layout bring images and multimedia to the foreground.  Scoop It is rapidly being adopted as a tool for creating content in academic libraries and educational institutions.

 

learnistYou may have heard of Pinterest?  Learnist is is a similar tool with an intellectual bent.  It acts as a visual repository of all your favorite articles, videos, ebooks, maps, surveys, blogs, podcasts, and images. You can create boards based on your interests and curate content around a chosen theme.

 

 

What do you plan to explore this summer???

Isn’t it wonderful how things slow down in the summer?  Often, the summer season allows us to dig into projects and explore interests that have been set aside for more pressing tasks during the academic year.  I tend to make a list of digital publishing tools to research and gain facility with over the summer.  […]MORE

In Honor of Earth Day a Look at “Earth as Art”

Posted by: on April 21, 2013   |Comment (1)|Digital Publishing

earth as art logoIn honor of Earth Day we invite you to take a minute and marvel at the beauty of the Earth.  One way to do this- explore satellite images of the Earth through one of NASA’s digital publishing ventures.  In late 2012 NASA published a book called Earth as Art.  The book is available for free download in PDF format.  NASA also created a free iPad App for the book.

In the book’s foreword, NASA Earth Scientist and editor of the volume Lawrence Friedl eloquently states:

“In 1960, the United States put its first Earth-observing environmental satellite into orbit around the planet. Over the decades, these satellites have provided invaluable information, and the vantage point of space has provided new perspectives on Earth. This book celebrates Earth’s aesthetic beauty in the patterns, shapes, colors, and textures of the land, oceans, ice, and atmosphere. Earth-observing environmental satellites can measure outside the visible range of light, so these images show more than what is visible to the naked eye. The beauty of Earth is clear, and the artistry ranges from the surreal to the sublime. Truly, by escaping Earth’s gravity we discovered its attraction.”

Here is a selection screen shots from the App.  We highly recommend you check it out.  Happy Earth Day!

Bombetoka Bay, Madagascare as art 7

Bogda Mountains, Chinae as art 5

Lena River Delta, Russiae as art 3

Himalayas, Central Asiae as art 2

Garden City, Kansas, United Statese as art 1

 

 

 

In honor of Earth Day we invite you to take a minute and marvel at the beauty of the Earth.  One way to do this- explore satellite images of the Earth through one of NASA’s digital publishing ventures.  In late 2012 NASA published a book called Earth as Art.  The book is available for free […]MORE

New guide makes citing film and audio easier

Posted by: on April 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

Front-cover-image-Audiovisual Citation GuidelinesDoes the word “citation” make you want to take a snooze?  We don’t blame you.  But if you’ve ever tried to cite something specifically challenging like a YouTube video or a TV commercial, you probably know the frustration that can ensue.  Thankfully, the British Universities Film and Television Council has just released a new set of Audiovisual Citation Guidelines that simplify the process.  The guidelines “address the growing need for a clear, comprehensive and consistent system for the citation of moving image and sound.”  They demonstrate citations for a variety of media including television and radio shows, audio recordings, DVD extras, video and audio clips, trailers, advertisements, amateur and archive material, podcasts, and more.

Here are a couple of examples from the guidelines:

Television Show Accessed Online:
Roddy Doyle’, Writer in Profile [television program clip, online] Pres. David Hanly. RTÉ, Ireland, 10/06/1992, RTÉ 1. 5mins 59secs. http://www.euscreen.eu/play.jsp?id=EUS_74BF381109E04797841DB8C2E30E20EF (accessed 29/09/2012).

Music Track:
‘Romance No.2 in F Major, op. 50’, Chill with Beethoven [music track, CD] Cond. Kenneth Jean, Perf. Slovak Philharmonic orchestra. Naxos, UK, 31/01/2006. 4mins 42secs. [Naxos, 8.556790, 2006].

User-Generated Online Content:
Kittys Meet [user-generated content, online] Creat. BFvsGF. 19/01/2013, 7mins 28secs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34hoyQ7oc2k (accessed 21/01/2013)

For more on this visit the British Universities Film and Television Council’s web page, or download the Audiovisual Citation Guidelines themselves.   You can also view the Phillips Memorial Library’s citation guide for further help with citations in a variety of formats and styles.

Does the word “citation” make you want to take a snooze?  We don’t blame you.  But if you’ve ever tried to cite something specifically challenging like a YouTube video or a TV commercial, you probably know the frustration that can ensue.  Thankfully, the British Universities Film and Television Council has just released a new set […]MORE

Open Education Week @ PC

Posted by: on March 7, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Next week marks the second annual International Open Education Week and we are pleased to announce a series of events exploring Open Education (OE).  If you are new to the idea of OE, this video gives a great summary:

Throughout the week we’ll look into some of the most prominent themes in the OE movement including Open Textbooks, Open Educational Resources, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), and more.  We hope the week’s events will prompt local discussion about the role librarians play in curating OERs (and OA collections) for students and faculty here at PC.

Here is the schedule of events.  All are welcome, so please mark your calendars!

Webinar: Driving Adoptions of OER Through Communities of Practice
Monday, March 11.  12:00 pm.  Library LL104A
Communities of practice, or mutually supporting groups organized around a common subject area, have the potential to increase the rate of adoption of Open Education Resources. College Open Textbooks sponsors a number of such communities. In this webinar, members of four communities will present their experience in driving adoption of OER. They will present lessons learned and look ahead to how these communities can be strengthened and increase their influence in the battle for adoptions.

Library Staff Present: OER Show and Tell
Friday, March 15.  10:00 am.  Library E-Classroom
Wondering what OERs are and what they look like?  Several library staff will demo how to find OERs, multi-media OERs, local OA collections, and review the major MOOC platforms.

Live Presentation, Developing MOOCs at Brown University
Monday, March 18.  3:00 pm.  “The Pit” Library First Floor
Kathy Takayama, Director of the Brown University Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, will lead a discussion on the development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) at Brown.  With courses scheduled to launch in June through the Coursera platform, Brown is currently developing their MOOC offerings.  This interactive presentation will center on the valuable lessons Kathy and her colleagues have learned about planning for MOOCs.  It will also emphasize important future considerations for faculty development and training in preparation for teaching and using MOOCs.  Anyone with an interest in MOOCs, online education, or open educational resources is encouraged to attend.

Next week marks the second annual International Open Education Week and we are pleased to announce a series of events exploring Open Education (OE).  If you are new to the idea of OE, this video gives a great summary: Throughout the week we’ll look into some of the most prominent themes in the OE movement […]MORE