DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

Posted by: on May 5, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the library’s Special Collections and Archives.

Building off the work done on the Theology Collections Portal, Doctors Illuzzi and Urbano worked to create a digital exhibit, Sons of Providence, through which they could share the archival materials and photographs that had informed their research along with multimedia elements including a documentary made in collaboration with Film Studies Minor Joseph Aiello ’17, an interactive map, and a wealth of photographs and primary documents. The Digital Publishing Services Coordinator supported the faculty as they created the exhibit using the Scalar platform. Two library-owned iPad kiosks configured to present the digital exhibit were installed as part of a physical exhibit in Harkins Hall during the spring of 2017. DPS staff photographed the exhibit and the images are available at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/exhibits_sons_providence/ . Another installation of the exhibit and kiosks will take place in the library in the coming year.

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the... MORE

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

While the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and... MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones. ... MORE

SPARC’s Director of Open Education Visits PC

Posted by: on January 30, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis on Monday, January 23rd.  View the slides from the talk here.

Allen described the current state of the textbook market, described how this is hurting students both financially and academically, and outlines some concrete examples of how open textbooks and OER can mitigate the problem.  The talk concluded with some helpful, concrete steps for librarians and faculty interested in setting the default to “open.”  Suggested steps include: when you can share, do share; change the default- consider using OER first for teaching or presentations, and then explore other options; support faculty as they work to adopt, adapt, and create OER; and, make “open” your mission.  Allen’s talk was attended by a mix of librarians, administrator, and faculty.  The event was recorded and a can be viewed here.

In addition to presenting this talk, Allen also attended a meeting of recipients of the OER mini-grants awarded by the Provost’s office.  Faculty grantees come from Education; Chemistry and Biochemistry; Psychology; and Finance.  The library and the Center for Teaching Excellence will work closely with these faculty as they adapt their syllabi to include OER.  More information on the progress of this initiative will be shared as it develops.

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and... MORE

Providence College Joins Open Textbook Initiative

Posted by: on November 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative is to reduce college costs by saving students $5 million over five years using openly licensed textbooks and open educational resources (OERs).  In addition to PC, current participating institutions include: Rhode Island College, the University of Rhode Island, the Community College of Rhode Island, Brown University, Bryant University, Roger Williams University, and the New England Institute of Technology.

PC textbooks Here at PC work has begun raise awareness of OERs and open textbooks on campus.  Representatives from the Library teamed up with Assistant Professor of Economics, James Campbell, to provide an introduction to open textbooks at the Center for Teaching Excellence on November 1st.  The presentation covered the basics of OER, information on locating open materials, and open licensing with Creative Commons.  Campbell is using an OpenStax textbook to teach several sections of Microeconomics this semester.  His insights on the experience were extremely valuable.  You can view the slides from the talk here.

Through generous support from the Provost’s Office the Center for Teaching Excellence and the Library are collaborating to administer a series of small mini-grants to support course design and revision projects that prioritize open educational resources (OERs).  Awardees will be selected this month.  Over the spring semester mini-grant recipients will work closely with the Library to incorporate open content into their syllabi for adoption in Fall 2017.

A Steering Committee made up of library representatives from participating institutions will be responsible for implementation of RI Open Textbook Initiative.  Members of the Steering Committee will communicate with the Open Textbook Network (URI, RIC, and CCRI are now member organizations), provide training opportunities around OERs for librarians around the state, and develop instruments for documenting and reporting student savings resulting from the initiative.

The Library’s Digital Publishing Services has been engaged with work around OERs for some time.  We are thrilled about these new opportunities to collaborate with PC faculty around OERs.  For further reading on this subject check out some of our previous here, here and here.

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative... MORE

Playing with Palladio

Posted by: on October 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters, and trends within data that may be difficult for an individual researcher interacting with the data to see.  Palladio serves as a means of enhancing (not replacing) traditional qualitative humanities research methods.  Data can be mapped, graphed to show network relationships, viewed and faceted as an interactive gallery, and more.  Palladio comes out of Stanford University’s Humanities + Design research lab.

I’m enrolled in an Introduction to Digital Humanities course through Library Juice Academy.  One of my assignments this week requires an examination of Palladio (as well as a similar tool, Google Fusion Tables).  Palladio peaked my interest.  My initial introduction and interaction with Palladio came through the very helpful Getting Started With Palladio tutorial by Miriam Posner.  This tutorial provides clear, easy to follow instructions for uploading data into Palladio and beginning to work with the data tools- definitely check it out.

After completing the Posner’s tutorial I got inspired to apply Palladio to some data we have access to through DPS projects.  I took a few minutes to aggregate data from a couple of different spreadsheets around the Dorr Letters Project.  My data looks like this:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.27.34 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

In less than a minute I was able to create this visualization graphing the “to” and “from” fields:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.26.07 PM

 

 

 

 

And this map showing the origination location for each item of correspondence:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.38.00 PM

 

 

 

 

I’ll continue to play with Palladio and update this post accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters,... MORE

Digital Publishing Services Welcomes You!

Posted by: on September 1, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you:

  • scholarly communication and copyright
  • personal digital archiving and digital asset management
  • scanning and digitization
  • media creation
  • journal publishing
  • text encoding and other digital humanities tools
  • graphic design
  • data visualization

For assistance contact dps@providence.edu.  We wish you all the best this academic year!

Phillips Memorial Library, your Finals Week study haven. #pcgrad #gofriars #pc2017 #friargram #pc2019

A photo posted by Phillips Memorial Library (@clubphil_pc) on

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As... MORE

Theology Collections Portal

Posted by: on July 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Posey_Image2If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the kiosk according to their research goals.  Options include:

  • Find Scholarly Sources for a Paper (articles, ebooks, specific journal titles)
  • Explore Theology Topics (major religions, Thomas Aquinas, Catholicism and Catholic social thought)
  • Find Bibles and Biblical Commentary
  • Get Research Help
  • Provide Feedback

Kiosk content is presented via a content management system (CMS) called Scalar.  Scalar provides a platform for the creation of rich, digital publications that integrate text and media using a variety of flexible templates.  A signature design element in Scalar is the ability to create multiple narrative paths through a work.  This path functionality made Scalar an ideal CMS for the creation of the theology kiosk content.  Additionally, Scalar presents built-in visualization tools, which allow creators to explore and adjust the relationships between content in different ways.   Scalar is supported by the Alliance for Networked Visual Culture.

You are welcome to explore the Theology Collections Portal online as well as at the iPad kiosk in the library.  Please do contact us with questions or suggestions-  our primary goal is to make the kiosk as helpful as possible for our researchers and your feedback is greatly valued!

 

If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology... MORE

text analysis with Voyant Tools

Posted by: on May 26, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis.

Voyant logoVoyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for textual analysis.  Using the tool is easy.  Go to the site and link to or upload your text (the system accepts a wide variety of formats including PDF, XML, TEI, and more).  Once you ingest the text or corpus you are presented with a dashboard of visualizations and tools.  Some of the tools built into Voyant include: Cirrus, a word cloud generator; Summary, a helpful overview of the corpus; Mandala, a visualization that shows the relationship between terms and documents; and many more (explore Voyant’s helpful documentation for the full list of tools).  Another great feature is the ability to generate a URL for the entire corpus dashboard or specific visualizations which can then be linked to or embedded into web-based writing.

Voyant Tools creators Stéfan Sinclar (@sgsinclair) and Geoffrey Rockwell (@GeoffRockwell) have also written a book called Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities (2016, MIT Press).  Rusty on your Greek and wondering what “hermeneutic” means, anyway?  So was I.  Hermeneutic means interpretive or explanatory and comes from the Greek “hermenēus,” interpreter.   The book is accompanied by an extremely rich and helpful web site, Hermeneuti.ca, that uses Voyant to visualize and interpret the book’s content while providing examples of how humanities scholars might integrate textual analysis visualizations into their writing.   One interesting example is found in Now Analyze That! in which speeches on the topic of race by Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright are analyzed.

Text analysis has been part of the digital humanities toolkit for some time.  Voyant has been in existence since 2013 and several examples of how it has been used in digital pedagogy are available.  These include Brian Croxall’s (@briancroxall) discussion of using Voyant Tools to analyze Hemingway; an explanation of how Voyant Tools was used to analyze a corpus of runaway slave advertisements in the U.S. antebellum south as part of a digital history course at Rice University; and a recent write-up on ProfHacker.

I decided to play with Voyant Tools using the corpus of correspondence presented on our Dorr Letters Project site.  I zipped up all 61 TEI files, uploaded the zip file to Voyant Tools, and got this dashboard:

Voyant Dashboard

How cool!?  There is a lot to unpack in this data but I’ll highlight a couple of the things that most struck me:

  • the most used words in the corpus are: dorr, letter, constitution and state (I didn’t remove the TEI Header, introductory text, or follow-up questions included in our TEI so what shows up in the dashboard is not just representative of the letter content)
  • the second 30 letters in teh collection were written by “Anti-Dorrites.”  isolating that part of the corpus and then comparing it to those letters written by Dorr might be revealing
  • it would be interesting to select only those letters written by Dorr and analyze the frequency of certain terms to see if patterns arise over time in relation to Dorr’s political views (of course, this is a small corpus so broad generalizations are dangerous)

Voyant Tools is simple to use and extremely interesting- give it a try yourself!

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis. Voyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for... MORE

DPS Welcomes Elizabeth Schneider

Posted by: on January 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a User Relations Manager and Technical Services Lead.  Elizabeth brings a wealth of knowledge about digital asset management systems and metadata to the department.  In her new role as Digital Publishing Services Specialist Elizabeth will work on digitization projects, assist in the management of our Digital Commons and Islandora repositories, collaborate with faculty in the creation of SelectedWorks pages, and contribute to a variety of cross-library initiatives.  Welcome Elizabeth!

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s... MORE