30,000 Getty Museum Images Published in Sleek New Viewer

30,000 Getty Museum Images Published in Sleek New Viewer

Posted by: on June 23, 2017   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The IIIF Mirador viewer showing the Getty Museum’s Van Tromp Going about to Please His Masters (left) and the Yale Center for British Art’s Dort or Dordrecht: The Dort Packet-Boat from Rotterdam Becalmed (right), both by J.M.W. Turner

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images are from the Open Content Program, a collection of images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the pubic domain. All images added to the program in the future will be immediately available in the new viewer.

To browse the images and play with the Mirador viewer, you can go to getty.edu and search the collection – any image with a blue and read IIIF icon underneath it can be viewed in the new viewer (check out Van Gogh’s Irises).

To do a side-by-side comparison:

  1. Select an artwork from the Getty Museum online collection that has a IIIF icon (just below the image and to the right).
  2. Click the IIIF icon to open the Mirador viewer.
  3. Select “Change Layout” at the top right to add one or more slots where you’d like additional artwork images to display.
  4. Select another artwork (with an IIIF icon) that you’d like to compare. Go to the webpage for this object and drag the IIIF icon from that browser tab or window into the new slot you’ve just created. The two images will now appear side by side.

Enjoy!

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images […]MORE

DPS Goes to DigiCamp

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comment (1)|Facilities and Tools

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology.

This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by Carolyn Goldstein and Andrew Elder on the Mass Memories Road Show, a state-wide digital history project that documents people, places, and events in Massachusetts history. The photographs and stories are preserved and publicly accessible in UMass Boston’s Open Archives.

The breakout session topics, collaboratively chosen by participants in advance of the event, included Technology for Users; Accessibility; Social Media/Marketing/Outreach; Digital Humanities, Preservation, and Pedagogy; VR/Video Games; Web/Course Guide Design and UX; Instructional Design/Teaching with Technology; OER, Open Access, and Altmetrics; Makerspaces; Interfaces & Collections; Cool Tools; and Assessment & Data. I attended the Technology for Users, VR/Video Games, and Makerspaces sessions, and got some great ideas for our MediaHub in Phillips Memorial Library.
The highlight of the day was a tour of and workshop in the UMass Boston MakerSpace lab, where we saw some 3D printing in action and learned the basics of 3D design, including a tutorial in Tinkercad, a free, web-based 3D design tool.

Looking forward to next year!

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology. This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by […]MORE

A New Look for PC’s Digital Commons

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio Art senior theses along with original student artworks in a variety of media. Check it out at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/.

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio […]MORE

Google’s New PhotoScan App Turns Prints into High-Quality Digital Images

Posted by: on December 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows you to quickly scan multiple photos, while also guiding you through scanning different parts of each photo to produce a much higher-quality image that reduces glare and shadow. The app also offers automatic rotation, cropping, and color-correction. Naturally, PhotoScan seamlessly integrates with Google Photos, but you can also save your scans to your camera roll or share them in other apps.

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows […]MORE

A Designer’s Treasure Trove: 200,000 Objects from Cooper Hewitt’s Collection Digitized

Posted by: on October 21, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized
Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and image complexity (beta). Each object also has a visual timeline of its life in the collection, from acquisition to digitization.

The site also includes an Experimental section with a few features that you can play with, including “Albers boxes”, an homage to the Bauhaus color-theorist:

“We show Albers boxes when an image can’t be found or when an image has not yet been digitized using the concentric squares as a device to convey some of the information about the object. The outer ring of an Albers box represents the department that an object belongs to; the middle ring represents the period that an object is a part of; the inner ring denotes the type of object […] We are trying to imagine a visual language that a person can become familiar with, over time, and use a way to quickly scan a result set and gain some understanding in the absence of an image of the object itself.”

For developers, they’ve also released an API, as well as the collections metadata and concordances for people dedicated to the public domain, under the Creative Commons CC0 license.

What’s maybe most impressive is that the collection was digitized in 18 months. For a glimpse behind the scenes, check out this video from Cooper Hewitt. And if you like to geek out in the weeds of things like project management and data mapping, you’ll want to check out Cooper Hewitt Labs, where Allison Hale is in the middle of a 4-part series of in-depth posts on the mass digitization, beginning with Workflows and Barcodes and Digital Asset Management.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and […]MORE

Personal Digital Archiving Faculty Workshop

Posted by: on September 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Trouble finding research or teaching materials on your computer? Overwhelmed with family photos? Not sure what “the cloud” even is?

PDA workspace computerJoin me on Tuesday, September 20 at 2:30 PM in the Phillips Memorial Library to learn some simple ways to start managing your digital life including tips for file naming, choosing file formats, and storage best practices.

I hope to see you there!

Can’t make it, but want to learn more? Check out this post from the Library of Congress blog, The Signal.

 

Trouble finding research or teaching materials on your computer? Overwhelmed with family photos? Not sure what “the cloud” even is? Join me on Tuesday, September 20 at 2:30 PM in the Phillips Memorial Library to learn some simple ways to start managing your digital life including tips for file naming, choosing file formats, and storage best practices. […]MORE

Redressing Wikipedia’s Diversity Problem

Posted by: on April 22, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

A couple of weeks ago, I participated in Strong Voices, Indigenous Women, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. It was my first foray into Wikipedia editing, and I was a little intimidated. I knew that Wikipedia uses a special markup language that I wasn’t familiar with, and beyond that I was feeling the import of editing such a hugely popular and public information resource. I’m no expert – who am I to edit this content?

But as I chatted with some of the other participants, it was clear that I wasn’t alone. These feelings are not uncommon among new editors, but overcoming them is a key to righting a big problem with Wikipedia – the lack of diversity in Wikipedia’s scope and content that’s been widely attributed to an overwhelmingly homogeneous editor community. Wikipedia’s gender issue has gained particular attention over the past several years, but the problem goes far beyond that. If you’re not very familiar with these issues, Sara Boboltz provides an incisive overview. As she succinctly puts it, Wikipedia editors are “mainly technically inclined, English-speaking, white-collar men living in majority-Christian, developed countries in the Northern hemisphere.”

There are many theories as to why this is, including the burden that the technical knowledge and time required place on potential editors. For example, women in many communities have less free time to devote to work like this. Also, like much of the rest of the male-dominated internet, women are not always welcomed and are much more likely to face harassment in these spaces, which inherently discourages their participation.

Another big part of this problem is Wikipedia’s notability guideline, which says that a topic has to have “received significant coverage in reliable sources that are independent of the subject” in order to be included in Wikipedia. It’s one of the ways that Wikipedia tries to maintain the integrity of its content, but it’s not hard to see the perpetuating effect that this guideline has on the lack of coverage of historically disenfranchised groups of people in our documented history.

If Wikipedia’s aim is to compile “the sum of all human knowledge”, everyone should be represented in the editor community. And as Wikipedia continues to grow as one of the most popular websites in the world, and its content becomes increasingly visible and authoritative, this is increasingly crucial. For example, Google now pulls Wikipedia content into it’s biographical sidebar making the information even more prominent.

The good news is that the Wikimedia Foundation is keenly aware of this problem and dedicating resources toward correcting it. For example, in 2012 they released VisualEditor, a more user-friendly editing interface and they’ve also allocated funds to initiatives that are building content on under-represented communities and subjects, like Wikipedia edit-a-thons.

While events like edit-a-thons are very successful at introducing Wikipedia editing and creating a safe space for first-timers to learn, a problem this entrenched and complex will require long-term engagement from this new wave of editors. We all have a right, and I might also argue, a responsibility, to participate in the documentation of our collective knowledge and history, and for all its shortcomings, Wikipedia provides an amazing space for us to do just that. In the words of co-founder, Jimmy Wales, “See that link up there? ‘edit this page’. Go for it, it’s a wiki.”

Want to try your hand at editing Wikipedia? Check out this beginner’s guide. Want to organize an edit-a-thon at your institution? This how-to is a great place to start.

A couple of weeks ago, I participated in Strong Voices, Indigenous Women, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. It was my first foray into Wikipedia editing, and I was a little intimidated. I knew that Wikipedia uses a special markup […]MORE

Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies

Posted by: on March 18, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous issues not only in New England, but also in the United States and internationally”. The discussion centered on “the use of digital media to foster education, research, and outreach within Indigenous communities and studies.” There was a focus on how digital media and tools can help to create connections between people and materials, as well as the importance of relationship-building with Native communities, the ethics surrounding these projects, and project management issues of resource allocation, stewardship, and sustainability.

I was particularly impressed with Tobias Glaza and Paul Grant-Costa’s Yale Indian Papers Project. They focused on the importance of Indigenous communities as stakeholders in the project and collaborating with community members right from the beginning to answer questions like – What’s most important to the community? How do they tell their stories? What information should remain private? How do they want to access and use their digital history? With this approach, they published the New England Indian Papers Series – “a scholarly critical edition of New England Native American primary source materials gathered into one robust virtual collection.” Built on Yale’s Ladybird software and using a Blacklight front-end, the platform is clean and easy-to-use, and includes a document reader, scholarly transcription, and extensive metadata.

An eye-opening takeaway from Alyssa Mt. Pleasant’s presentation on the American Indian Studies (AIS) resources portal that she built at Yale, is the importance of maintaining a project’s stewardship to ensure its longevity. Unfortunately, the AIS portal, which took 3 years to build, wasn’t taken on by anyone else when she left Yale, and consequently, is no longer accessible.

Lisa Brooks from Amherst College gave a fantastic talk on the problem of trying to understand the history of Native spaces when the main existing reference points are colonial maps. She’s worked extensively on creating new historical maps of Indigenous spaces to support her research and is also engaged in the idea of maps as storytelling, often combining her maps with present-day photos of the locations to bring them to life. Her work is included in Amherst’s digital map collection, which was created using Esri’s ArcGIS platform, and is definitely worth checking out.

Another standout was Dana Leibsohn’s project, Vistas, which “seeks to bring an understanding of the visual culture of Spanish America to a broad audience.” Vistas was designed as a non-linear platform, in an effort to encourage multiple pathways between content that would support research in a variety of scholarly disciplines, as well as less formal modes of education and learning. Launched in the late 90’s, Vistas has undergone three major evolutions, from a website hosted by Smith College, to a DVD, and now back to an online version hosted by Fordham University. Dr. Leibsohn’s stewardship of the project over the years has clearly been integral to its longevity, which includes her commitment to tackling the challenges of migrating the platform to keep up with ever-evolving technologies.

There were also a couple of great discussions surrounding endangered Native languages, including a conversation on the power of digital activism to increase online, and particularly social media usage of these languages, as a way of preserving them.

Obviously all of these projects are contributing to content-collection, digital preservation, and scholarship needs, but it was great to hear that so many are focused on supporting Indigenous communities by facilitating access to their histories, preserving them, and ultimately, helping to amplify the voices of these communities.

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous […]MORE

Engaging Users and Remixing Content: New York Public Library’s Digital Collections

Posted by: on February 12, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic views of the U.S., but as I delved deeper, I discovered all of the exciting tools and initiatives that they’ve integrated into the collections to encourage discovery, interaction, sharing, research, and reuse. In particular, I’ve been musing on the fantastic visual browsing tool. Data visualization is still often thought of simply as a graphic, sometimes interactive, representation of statistics and other data, but it also clearly has so much potential as a tool for discovery, by helping users to better understand the scope of the information that they’re searching or exploring.

A thousand skaters, Central Park

Strohmeyer & Wyman, “A thousand skaters, Central Park” (1889), stereoscopic image (via NYPL)

Beyond content visualization, NYPL is championing active user/content engagement with the Digital Collections API, a Remix Residency program and other tools from the creative folks at NYPL Labs, like The Green Book trip planner, which uses “locations extracted from mid-20th century motor guides that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, and other destinations where Black travelers would be welcome.”

For those of us who spend most of our days in the weeds of content management, NYPL’s Digital Collections initiatives are a great reminder to think innovatively about how we can better connect and engage users with digital collections.

For some Friday fun, check out their Stereogranimator and create some 3D images!

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic […]MORE