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Prince and Copyright

Posted by: on June 29, 2017   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news, and two stories of note have emerged in recent months.

The first centers around a fair use debate (similar to the fair use case covered in an earlier post, regarding Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a reference photo as inspiration for the piece). The estate of Andy Warhol has filed suit against New York City photographer, Lynn Goldsmith, as a preemptive strike against her to protect Warhol’s legacy; according to the NY Daily News, Goldsmith had been expected to file a copyright infringement lawsuit against the estate. Goldsmith alleges that Warhol used a photo she took of Prince in 1981 as inspiration for his Prince Series (created in 1984) without asking or crediting her.

The estate argues that Warhol’s appropriation of the photo was transformative enough to be considered new work (therefore, fair use under U.S. copyright law) and Goldsmith is ignoring this aspect in an extortion attempt. Estate lawyer, Luke Nikas, stated in court documents that, “Although Warhol often used photographs taken by others as inspiration for his portraits, Warhol’s works were entirely new creations. As would be plain to any reasonable observer, each portrait in Warhol’s Prince Series fundamentally transformed the visual aesthetic and meaning of the Prince Publicity Photograph.” When asked why she did not pursue legal measures at any point over the past 30 years, Goldsmith said that she was only made aware of the pieces in 2016, when Condé Nast published a special issue called, The Genius of Prince. The estate counters that she knew of the pieces as far back as 1984, when she granted permission to Vanity Fair to publish one of them.

Prince’s image isn’t the only thing sparking debate – his catalog of work is, as well. While his Warner Bros. music catalog was released earlier this year to digital streaming platforms, his videography remains largely inaccessible to the public due to copyright dispute. Will his full videography be made available at some point? And further, will the public ever gain access to the material in his Paisley Park estate’s storied vault? It’s been speculated that nearly all of the contents of the vault lack thorough rights contracts. Prince’s estate has been in flux for some time, as it battles to resolve contractual disputes with Universal and Warner over rights. Since his passing in April 2016, various issues involving rights have arisen – the hope is for speedy resolution to all issues of copyright, so the public may freely access his work. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news, and two stories of note have emerged in recent months. The first centers around a fair use debate (similar to the fair use case covered in an earlier post, regarding Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a reference photo as inspiration […]MORE

30,000 Getty Museum Images Published in Sleek New Viewer

Posted by: on June 23, 2017   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The IIIF Mirador viewer showing the Getty Museum’s Van Tromp Going about to Please His Masters (left) and the Yale Center for British Art’s Dort or Dordrecht: The Dort Packet-Boat from Rotterdam Becalmed (right), both by J.M.W. Turner

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images are from the Open Content Program, a collection of images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the pubic domain. All images added to the program in the future will be immediately available in the new viewer.

To browse the images and play with the Mirador viewer, you can go to getty.edu and search the collection – any image with a blue and read IIIF icon underneath it can be viewed in the new viewer (check out Van Gogh’s Irises).

To do a side-by-side comparison:

  1. Select an artwork from the Getty Museum online collection that has a IIIF icon (just below the image and to the right).
  2. Click the IIIF icon to open the Mirador viewer.
  3. Select “Change Layout” at the top right to add one or more slots where you’d like additional artwork images to display.
  4. Select another artwork (with an IIIF icon) that you’d like to compare. Go to the webpage for this object and drag the IIIF icon from that browser tab or window into the new slot you’ve just created. The two images will now appear side by side.

Enjoy!

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images […]MORE

The MediaHub Gets A Welcome Upgrade

Posted by: on June 15, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard for the last few months revamping the MediaHub with the intent of making it a more active workspace for students, faculty, and staff.  The intention is to make this more like a “Makerspace,” as many other libraries have done across the country.  This is still a work in progress, but we have acquired a few items to get closer to reaching our goal of a creating a fully functioning Makerspace-type lab. The lab includes four iMacs that include a host of audio and video editing software, such as Adobe Premiere, Final Cut Pro, and Adobe Audition. The lab also includes microphones and audio interface devices that can be used for podcasting, etc. And we recently added a green screen kit that includes lights and a tripod to hold various cameras, so that students can create compelling video and still camera projects.  Additionally, we purchased a button maker and a few smartphone VR headsets to add to the creative process.  Please come by the MediaHub and get creative!

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard for the last few months revamping the MediaHub with the intent of making it a more active workspace for students, faculty, and staff.  The intention is to make this more like a “Makerspace,” as many other libraries have done across the country.  This is still a work in progress, […]MORE

DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

Posted by: on May 5, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the library’s Special Collections and Archives.

Building off the work done on the Theology Collections Portal, Doctors Illuzzi and Urbano worked to create a digital exhibit, Sons of Providence, through which they could share the archival materials and photographs that had informed their research along with multimedia elements including a documentary made in collaboration with Film Studies Minor Joseph Aiello ’17, an interactive map, and a wealth of photographs and primary documents. The Digital Publishing Services Coordinator supported the faculty as they created the exhibit using the Scalar platform. Two library-owned iPad kiosks configured to present the digital exhibit were installed as part of a physical exhibit in Harkins Hall during the spring of 2017. DPS staff photographed the exhibit and the images are available at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/exhibits_sons_providence/ . Another installation of the exhibit and kiosks will take place in the library in the coming year.

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the […]MORE

Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection Releases Hundreds of Digitized Images

Posted by: on April 21, 2017   |Comment (1)|Digital Asset Management

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s personal archive. Adler served as director of publicity for Def Jam Records and Rush Artist Management from 1984-1990, where he worked alongside producers Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons, during an era when the label released notable albums by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys, Slick Rick, Run-DMC, EPMD, and De La Soul. Cornell’s curator of rare books and manuscripts, Katherine Reagan, comments that, “Bill’s files are a rich and deep resource for the study of hip-hop’s emergence in the popular press and as a force within the music industry, and they enrich our understanding of hip-hop’s 40-year history.”

The Hip Hop Collection is part of the Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. They received Adler’s archive in 2013, but the newly added pieces represent only 5 percent of the full archive – the rest can be seen in person at the library, for now. The library plans to digitize the rest of Adler’s archive over the next few years, and this recent batch includes over 1700 images. Adler started collecting in the 70s, when there were few resources about hip-hop and the internet did not exist. “But there was a tremendous explosion of writing about hip-hop in real time,” he said. “I’m thrilled to know that the collection is going to be made available to anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection, anywhere in the world.” (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill […]MORE

DPS Goes to DigiCamp

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comment (1)|Facilities and Tools

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology.

This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by Carolyn Goldstein and Andrew Elder on the Mass Memories Road Show, a state-wide digital history project that documents people, places, and events in Massachusetts history. The photographs and stories are preserved and publicly accessible in UMass Boston’s Open Archives.

The breakout session topics, collaboratively chosen by participants in advance of the event, included Technology for Users; Accessibility; Social Media/Marketing/Outreach; Digital Humanities, Preservation, and Pedagogy; VR/Video Games; Web/Course Guide Design and UX; Instructional Design/Teaching with Technology; OER, Open Access, and Altmetrics; Makerspaces; Interfaces & Collections; Cool Tools; and Assessment & Data. I attended the Technology for Users, VR/Video Games, and Makerspaces sessions, and got some great ideas for our MediaHub in Phillips Memorial Library.
The highlight of the day was a tour of and workshop in the UMass Boston MakerSpace lab, where we saw some 3D printing in action and learned the basics of 3D design, including a tutorial in Tinkercad, a free, web-based 3D design tool.

Looking forward to next year!

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology. This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by […]MORE

New Library Exhibits Now Available

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services has been busy capturing the library’s most recent exhibitions and adding them to our Digital Commons image galleries. Exhibits include: Sister Saints of the Dominican Order, featuring seven female saints rotated throughout the Spring semester 2017, Albertus Magnus: St. Albert the Great, in honor of a lecture in Providence College’s Aquinas Hall on November 10, 2016, Opening Ceremonies of Providence College, September 18, 1919, featuring photographs from Providence College’s opening, and Providence College Charter Day, created in honor of Providence College celebrating its centennial of the signing of its charter on February 14, 2017.

Albertus Magnus: St. Albert The Great Exhibit Case – Photo 1, Fall 2016

Harkins Hall Dedication Ceremonies, May 25, 1919

Charter Day Exhibit Case – Photo 2, Spring 2017

St. Rosa of Lima – Reproduction, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, ca.1670

Digital Publishing Services has been busy capturing the library’s most recent exhibitions and adding them to our Digital Commons image galleries. Exhibits include: Sister Saints of the Dominican Order, featuring seven female saints rotated throughout the Spring semester 2017, Albertus Magnus: St. Albert the Great, in honor of a lecture in Providence College’s Aquinas Hall on November […]MORE

Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of fame are represented, from Elizabeth I and Aphra Behn to anonymous and pseudonymous writers. Here are just a few of the texts:


Cavendish, Margaret (Lucas), Duchess of Newcastle: The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing-World, 1667. An early work of sci-fi!

Neither was it a wonder that the men did freeze to death; for they were not onely driven to the very end or point of the Pole of that World, but even to another Pole of another World, which joined close to it…

By this Poetical Description, you may perceive, that my ambition is not onely to be Empress, but Authoress of a whole World; and that the Worlds I have made, both the Blazing- and the other Philosophical World, mentioned in the first part of this Description, are framed and composed of the most pure, that is, the Rational parts of Matter, which are the parts of my Mind…And in the formation of those Worlds, I take more delight and glory, then ever Alexander or Cesar did in conquering this terrestrial world.


Sowernam, Ester: Esther Hath Hang’d Haman, 1617. One of several responses to Joseph Swetnam’s misogynistic pamphlet “The Arraignment of Lewd, Idle, Froward, and Unconstant Women”, this text methodically points out holes in Swetnam’s logic and refutes his points in like manner.

He runneth on, and saith, They were made of a Rib, and that their froward and crooked nature doth declare, for a Rib is a crooked thing, &c. Woman was made of a crooked rib, so she is crooked of conditions. Joseph Swetnam was made as from Adam of clay and dust, so he is of a durty and muddy disposition.


Barbauld, Anna Laetitia (Aikin): Poems, 1773. Poetry about nature, politics and current events, the poet’s friends, and other subjects.

From glittering scenes which strike the dazzled sight
With mimic grandeur and illusive light,
From idle hurry, and tumultous noise,
From hollow friendships, and from sickly joys,
Will Delia, at the muse’s call retire
To the pure pleasures rural scenes inspire?
Will she from crowds and busy cities fly,
Where wreaths of curling smoke involve the sky,
To taste the grateful shade of spreading trees,
And drink the spirit of the mountain breeze?


And from her Sins of Government, Sins of the Nation, 1793:

If an oppressive law, or a destructive war, were of the nature of a volcano or a hurricane, proceeding from causes totally independent of our operations, all we should have to do, would be to bow our heads in silent submission, and to bear their ravages with a manly patience. We do not repent of a dangerous disorder or a sickly constitution, because these are things which do not depend upon our own efforts…But we are called upon to repent of national sins, because we can help them, and because we ought to help them.

There are some, whose nerves, rather than whose principles, cannot bear cruelty — like other nuisances, they would not chuse it in sight, but they can be well content to know it exists, and that they are indebted for it to the increase of their income, and the luxuries of their table.


Davies, Lady Eleanor: The Benediction, 1651. Davies published a number of works in which she interpreted Biblical prophecies in Daniel and Revelation through anagrams, numerology, and other tools to apply to current events. She anagrammed her own maiden name, Eleanor Audelie, as “Reveale O Daniel.” This document asserts God’s blessing on Oliver Cromwell.

By whom Decypher’d that Generals Thundring Donative his the Crown and Bended Bowe (Rev. 6.) That Seal or Box of Nard opened; as much to say, O: Cromwel, Renowned be Victorious so long as Sun Moon continues or livever.

Anagram, Howl Rome: And thus with one voice, come and see, O: C: Conquering and to Conquer went forth.


Take a look at the WWO database while it’s still Women’s History Month!

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of […]MORE

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

While the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in […]MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above. It was fun […]MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web viewing and for use with no copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project, and Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a recent statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site here, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web […]MORE

A New Look for PC’s Digital Commons

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio Art senior theses along with original student artworks in a variety of media. Check it out at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/.

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio […]MORE

The Zeutschel overhead scanner is here!

Posted by: on February 10, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services is proud to announce a new addition to the DPS Lab! The Zeutschel OS12002 overhead cradle book scanner. This mighty piece of equipment will allow the DPS Lab to work with a variety of print materials, including delicate/ fragile bound books and documents, to larger books, maps and newspapers.  The overhead scanner houses two highly sensitive and intuitive cameras that scan the documents, one of which is a 3D camera, which through the software PerfectBook, can correct the curvature of a book, document, etc.  This scanner was designed specifically to deal with all of the complicated issues many archivists of print material have had to deal with over the years. Digital Publishing Services is excited have this scanner in our possession so we can move forward with many ambitious projects in the future.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to announce a new addition to the DPS Lab! The Zeutschel OS12002 overhead cradle book scanner. This mighty piece of equipment will allow the DPS Lab to work with a variety of print materials, including delicate/ fragile bound books and documents, to larger books, maps and newspapers.  The overhead scanner houses […]MORE

Rosarium is Live

Posted by: on February 3, 2017   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

Rosarium has been up and running for a few months, but I don’t think it’s been officially announced anywhere, so: Rosarium is live!

The Rosarium Project is an online collection of nonfiction writing about roses compiled and TEI-encoded by Julia R. Tryon, Assistant Professor and Commons Librarian for Research & Education at PC. It is expected to be of use to garden historians, to gardeners who may be interested in learning about older techniques and cultivars, and to scholars of leisure activity and lifestyles.

Currently the collection contains magazine articles dating from 1894 to 1922, with an eventual goal of expanding its chronological scope backwards to the sixteenth century. It is fully searchable. Results are sortable by date, reverse date, journal, title, or author, and can additionally be filtered by rose variety or other subject, by rose color, and by journal type (literary, women’s, arts, gardening, etc.). The user can add records to a bookbag which can then be emailed, generate citations, and learn more about people and terms mentioned in the articles by reading pop-ups which appear when names are clicked.

  • View Rosarium here.
  • More about Rosarium here.

Here are a few screenshots:

Rosarium has been up and running for a few months, but I don’t think it’s been officially announced anywhere, so: Rosarium is live! The Rosarium Project is an online collection of nonfiction writing about roses compiled and TEI-encoded by Julia R. Tryon, Assistant Professor and Commons Librarian for Research & Education at PC. It is […]MORE

SPARC’s Director of Open Education Visits PC

Posted by: on January 30, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis on Monday, January 23rd.  View the slides from the talk here.

Allen described the current state of the textbook market, described how this is hurting students both financially and academically, and outlines some concrete examples of how open textbooks and OER can mitigate the problem.  The talk concluded with some helpful, concrete steps for librarians and faculty interested in setting the default to “open.”  Suggested steps include: when you can share, do share; change the default- consider using OER first for teaching or presentations, and then explore other options; support faculty as they work to adopt, adapt, and create OER; and, make “open” your mission.  Allen’s talk was attended by a mix of librarians, administrator, and faculty.  The event was recorded and a can be viewed here.

In addition to presenting this talk, Allen also attended a meeting of recipients of the OER mini-grants awarded by the Provost’s office.  Faculty grantees come from Education; Chemistry and Biochemistry; Psychology; and Finance.  The library and the Center for Teaching Excellence will work closely with these faculty as they adapt their syllabi to include OER.  More information on the progress of this initiative will be shared as it develops.

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis on Monday, January 23rd.  View the slides from the talk here. Allen described the current state of the textbook market, described how this is hurting students both financially and academically, […]MORE

Google’s New PhotoScan App Turns Prints into High-Quality Digital Images

Posted by: on December 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows you to quickly scan multiple photos, while also guiding you through scanning different parts of each photo to produce a much higher-quality image that reduces glare and shadow. The app also offers automatic rotation, cropping, and color-correction. Naturally, PhotoScan seamlessly integrates with Google Photos, but you can also save your scans to your camera roll or share them in other apps.

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows […]MORE

Providence College Joins Open Textbook Initiative

Posted by: on November 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative is to reduce college costs by saving students $5 million over five years using openly licensed textbooks and open educational resources (OERs).  In addition to PC, current participating institutions include: Rhode Island College, the University of Rhode Island, the Community College of Rhode Island, Brown University, Bryant University, Roger Williams University, and the New England Institute of Technology.

PC textbooks Here at PC work has begun raise awareness of OERs and open textbooks on campus.  Representatives from the Library teamed up with Assistant Professor of Economics, James Campbell, to provide an introduction to open textbooks at the Center for Teaching Excellence on November 1st.  The presentation covered the basics of OER, information on locating open materials, and open licensing with Creative Commons.  Campbell is using an OpenStax textbook to teach several sections of Microeconomics this semester.  His insights on the experience were extremely valuable.  You can view the slides from the talk here.

Through generous support from the Provost’s Office the Center for Teaching Excellence and the Library are collaborating to administer a series of small mini-grants to support course design and revision projects that prioritize open educational resources (OERs).  Awardees will be selected this month.  Over the spring semester mini-grant recipients will work closely with the Library to incorporate open content into their syllabi for adoption in Fall 2017.

A Steering Committee made up of library representatives from participating institutions will be responsible for implementation of RI Open Textbook Initiative.  Members of the Steering Committee will communicate with the Open Textbook Network (URI, RIC, and CCRI are now member organizations), provide training opportunities around OERs for librarians around the state, and develop instruments for documenting and reporting student savings resulting from the initiative.

The Library’s Digital Publishing Services has been engaged with work around OERs for some time.  We are thrilled about these new opportunities to collaborate with PC faculty around OERs.  For further reading on this subject check out some of our previous here, here and here.

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative is to reduce college costs by saving students $5 million over five years using openly licensed textbooks and open educational resources (OERs).  In addition to PC, current participating institutions include: Rhode Island College, the University […]MORE

Open Access Monographs Coming to JSTOR

Posted by: on November 20, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

jstor-logo

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, UCL Press, and Cornell University Press) are currently available.

“The introduction of this Open Access program is part of our ongoing efforts to expand discovery, access, and use of scholarly materials,” noted Frank Smith, Books at JSTOR Director. “We look forward to sharing what we learn with the scholarly communications community.”

Recently, JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources and part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico announced a new program to make Open Access monographs available on the JSTOR platform. An initial 63 titles from four academic presses (University of California Press, University of Michigan Press, […]MORE

Library of Congress Unveils New Homepage

Posted by: on November 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
The Library of Congress's new homepage (Source)

The Library of Congress’s new homepage (Source)

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as part of the larger redesign of their site, currently in the works. The Library’s blog, The Signal, recently published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the Library of Congress, where she discussed user experience (UX) and the importance of design focus in libraries.

Project One is the name of the Library’s redesign initiative, led by Smith. One of Project One’s biggest challenges, says Smith, is that the Library started sharing their (vast amount of) content early on the web, using older technologies, and a substantial amount of “re-work” is necessary to integrate the old content with new technologies. Also challenging has been the task of conceptualizing a framework for the site that is optimized for search; decisions need to be made about which objects need metadata and appropriate metadata needs to be assigned to items. Once that foundation is laid, the team aims to build structures for packaging the content in different ways to appeal to certain audiences.

For more on the design process and to view the interview with Natalie Buda Smith, please visit the post on The Signal‘s site here. To view the Library of Congress’s new homepage, please visit loc.gov.

On Tuesday, November 1st, the Library of Congress unveiled the new redesign of their website homepage. The unveiling comes as part of the larger redesign of their site, currently in the works. The Library’s blog, The Signal, recently published an interview (conducted by Jaime Mears) with Natalie Buda Smith, User (UX) Team supervisor for the […]MORE

1666 London on Two Video Game Maps

Posted by: on November 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

This past September was the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, and the Museum of London has augmented its commemorative “Fire! Fire!” exhibit with a Minecraft map in which players explore the city and fight the fire as it occurs. (NYT article here – one Youtube video of gameplay can be watched here.) One stated goal of using games to convey historical information is to attract and engage children and non-traditional museum patrons — but it’s also interesting to think about ways in which the game might provide a new learning experience even for people with a more conventional history background. For instance, you might read in a book or article that the spread of the fire is partly attributed to the Mayor’s delay in ordering the destruction of houses to create firebreaks — but you could also, as in the gameplay video linked above, run a long way through confusing, similar-looking burning streets to find the Mayor and bring him to the site where the fire started, because your objective as a player is to get him to give the order, and then feel the frustration when he refuses! (Empathy is a subject that comes up in discussion of history-based and history education video games.)

Another video game-related map is Pudding Lane Productions’s 2013 Cryengine map of the area where the fire began, which won the “Off the Map” competition for developing 3D video game scenery based on maps from the British Library. The developers’ discussion of their process reveals some of the challenges that also face scholars working with historical documents. Using the maps as their source, they were able to lay out the streets and the footprints of the buildings, but found that the resulting model was not cramped enough and lacked vitality. Revisions increased the overhang of buildings’ upper stories into the streets, as well as adding crates, carts, vendors’ stalls, wares hung outside shops, washing lines, and other “props” that wouldn’t have made it onto maps, but that were nonetheless a part of London and people’s experience of life in the city. Additionally, they added as many real attested businesses as possible, using historical sources like Samuel Pepys’s diary; this lends the map a great deal of accuracy, but also highlights the gaps in our knowledge of day-to-day life, since most of the houses and businesses on the map did simply have to be generic and modular.

Interestingly, the Pudding Lane developers also mention that “[o]ne key issue caused by following the source material so closely was that a lot of seventeenth-century London looked very similar”. They addressed this by using different palettes in different areas. (This map doesn’t have any people on it, but if it had, perhaps the difference in areas would be established by populating them with different kinds of non-player characters going about their business.) This issue is very prominent in the less-sophisticated Minecraft map as well, but in that game it might be a feature instead of a bug.

This past September was the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, and the Museum of London has augmented its commemorative “Fire! Fire!” exhibit with a Minecraft map in which players explore the city and fight the fire as it occurs. (NYT article here – one Youtube video of gameplay can be watched here.) […]MORE

Open Access Week: Three Open Access-related Videos Worth Watching

Posted by: on October 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

In honor of Open Access week, Digital Publishing would like to share with you three movies related to Open Access and copyright issues: RIP: A Remix Manifesto, The Internet’s Own Boy, and Copyright Criminals.

 

RIP: A Remix Manifesto: release date – ca. 2009

A film by web activist Brett Gaylor and musician Greg Gillis, aka Girl Talk. This is a compelling and fun movie about the history of copyright and its implications on creativity. It draws upon the work of Girl Talk, and the filmmaker himself, as some of the examples of the complexities surrounding copyright law in regards to sampling music, film, etc., and using other artists creativity as a stepping stone for their own work.

The Internet’s Own Boy: release date – 2014

From DocumentaryStorm:

The Internet’s Own Boy follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity.

Copyright Criminals: release date – 2009

From Vimeo:

A documentary that examines the creative and commercial value of sampling in music. Featuring Public Enemy, De La Soul, QBert and more

Still from RIP: A Remix Manifesto

Still from Copyright Criminals

screen-shot-2016-10-27-at-1-56-00-pm

Still from The Internet’s Own Boy

In honor of Open Access week, Digital Publishing would like to share with you three movies related to Open Access and copyright issues: RIP: A Remix Manifesto, The Internet’s Own Boy, and Copyright Criminals.   RIP: A Remix Manifesto: release date – ca. 2009 A film by web activist Brett Gaylor and musician Greg Gillis, aka Girl Talk. This […]MORE

A Designer’s Treasure Trove: 200,000 Objects from Cooper Hewitt’s Collection Digitized

Posted by: on October 21, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized
Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Conservator setting up ceramic object for digital capture.© Smithsonian Institution.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and image complexity (beta). Each object also has a visual timeline of its life in the collection, from acquisition to digitization.

The site also includes an Experimental section with a few features that you can play with, including “Albers boxes”, an homage to the Bauhaus color-theorist:

“We show Albers boxes when an image can’t be found or when an image has not yet been digitized using the concentric squares as a device to convey some of the information about the object. The outer ring of an Albers box represents the department that an object belongs to; the middle ring represents the period that an object is a part of; the inner ring denotes the type of object […] We are trying to imagine a visual language that a person can become familiar with, over time, and use a way to quickly scan a result set and gain some understanding in the absence of an image of the object itself.”

For developers, they’ve also released an API, as well as the collections metadata and concordances for people dedicated to the public domain, under the Creative Commons CC0 license.

What’s maybe most impressive is that the collection was digitized in 18 months. For a glimpse behind the scenes, check out this video from Cooper Hewitt. And if you like to geek out in the weeds of things like project management and data mapping, you’ll want to check out Cooper Hewitt Labs, where Allison Hale is in the middle of a 4-part series of in-depth posts on the mass digitization, beginning with Workflows and Barcodes and Digital Asset Management.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has digitized and released more than 200,000 objects, and as you might expect from a prominent design museum, the collection is presented in a sharp and engaging interface. They’ve included extensive metadata for each object, which allows for an engrossing browsing experience. You can search and filter by a variety of facets, including color, size, and […]MORE

Playing with Palladio

Posted by: on October 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters, and trends within data that may be difficult for an individual researcher interacting with the data to see.  Palladio serves as a means of enhancing (not replacing) traditional qualitative humanities research methods.  Data can be mapped, graphed to show network relationships, viewed and faceted as an interactive gallery, and more.  Palladio comes out of Stanford University’s Humanities + Design research lab.

I’m enrolled in an Introduction to Digital Humanities course through Library Juice Academy.  One of my assignments this week requires an examination of Palladio (as well as a similar tool, Google Fusion Tables).  Palladio peaked my interest.  My initial introduction and interaction with Palladio came through the very helpful Getting Started With Palladio tutorial by Miriam Posner.  This tutorial provides clear, easy to follow instructions for uploading data into Palladio and beginning to work with the data tools- definitely check it out.

After completing the Posner’s tutorial I got inspired to apply Palladio to some data we have access to through DPS projects.  I took a few minutes to aggregate data from a couple of different spreadsheets around the Dorr Letters Project.  My data looks like this:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.27.34 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

In less than a minute I was able to create this visualization graphing the “to” and “from” fields:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.26.07 PM

 

 

 

 

And this map showing the origination location for each item of correspondence:

Screen Shot 2016-10-14 at 4.38.00 PM

 

 

 

 

I’ll continue to play with Palladio and update this post accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

Palladio is a research tool for examining data across time and space.  It allows for the identification of patterns, clusters, and trends within data that may be difficult for an individual researcher interacting with the data to see.  Palladio serves as a means of enhancing (not replacing) traditional qualitative humanities research methods.  Data can be […]MORE

Opening the Textbook

Posted by: on October 6, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

oer_survey

A research report was released by the Babson Survey Research Group on July 26, 2016: “Opening the Textbook: Educational Resources in Higher Education, 2015-2016.” Using responses from 3,000 U.S. faculty, the report provides a snapshot of faculty awareness, use and attitudes toward open textbooks. The study seeks to better understand the selection process by faculty for educational materials that they employ in their courses.

REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Most higher education faculty are unaware of open educational resources (OER) – but they are interested and some are willing to give it a try. Survey results, using responses of over 3,000 U.S. faculty, show that OER is not a driving force in the selection of materials – with the most significant barrier being the effort required to find and evaluate such materials. Use of open resources is low overall, but somewhat higher for large enrollment introductory-level courses.

Selecting Teaching Resources:

  • Almost all (90%) of teaching faculty selected new or revised educational materials for at least one course over the previous two years.
  • The most common activity was changing required materials for an existing course (74%), followed by substantially modifying a course (65%). Creating a new course was the least common activity (48%).
  • The most common factor cited by faculty when selecting educational resources was the cost to the students. After cost, the next most common was the comprehensiveness of the resource, followed by how easy it was to find.
  • There is a serious disconnect between how many faculty include a factor in selecting educational resources and how satisfied they are with the state of that factor. For example, faculty are least satisfied with the cost of textbooks, yet that is the most commonly listed factor for resource selections.

Required Textbooks:

  • Virtually all courses (98%) require a textbook or other non-textbook material as part of their suite of required resources.
  • Required textbooks are more likely to be in printed form (69%) than digital. Faculty require digital textbooks in conjunction with a printed textbook more often than using only digital textbooks.
  • Only 5.3% of courses are using an openly licensed (Creative Commons or public domain) required textbook.
  • For large enrollment introductory undergraduate courses openly licensed OpenStax College textbooks are adopted at twice the rate (10%) as open licensed textbooks among all courses.

Licensing:

  • There has been very little change in the past year in the proportion of faculty who report that they are aware of copyright status of classroom content.
  • Awareness of public domain licensing and Creative Commons licensing has remained steady.
  • Faculty continue to have a much greater level of awareness of the type of licensing often used for OER (Creative Commons) than they do of OER itself, and it is clear that they do not always associate this licensing with OER.

Open Educational Resources:

  • Faculty awareness of OER has increased in the last year, but remains low. Only 6.6% of faculty reported that they were “Very aware” of open educational resources, with around three times that many (19%) saying that they were “Aware”.
  • The level of faculty awareness of open textbooks (a specific type of OER) was somewhat lower than that for open educational resources; only 34% of faculty claimed some level of awareness.

Barriers to OER Adoption:

  • The barriers to adopting OER most often cited by faculty are that “there are not enough resources for my subject” (49%), it is “too hard to find what I need” (48%) and “there is no comprehensive catalog of resources” (45%).
  • There has been a decrease in faculty concerns about permission to use or change OER materials, and increases in concerns about the quality of OER and that it is timely and up-to-date.
  • Most faculty do not have experience searching for OER materials and cannot compare the ease of finding OER with traditional materials. Only 2.5% thought that it was easier to search for OER.

Future:

  • The number of faculty claiming that they would use OER in the future (6.9%) is of the same order of magnitude of those already using open resources (5.3%). A larger group (31.3%) reports that they will consider future OER use.

A research report was released by the Babson Survey Research Group on July 26, 2016: “Opening the Textbook: Educational Resources in Higher Education, 2015-2016.” Using responses from 3,000 U.S. faculty, the report provides a snapshot of faculty awareness, use and attitudes toward open textbooks. The study seeks to better understand the selection process by faculty for […]MORE

Collections as Data 2016 Conference

Posted by: on September 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

CollectionsAsData 1A
On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website provides the following description for the event:

“The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.”

Participants had the option of attending in-person or virtually, as the event was live-streamed on the Library of Congress YouTube channel; members of the Digital Publishing Services team attended sessions virtually throughout the day. Sessions were open to the public and organizers asked that attendees use the hashtag #AsData in their tags. A video recording of the conference has been archived on the LOC YouTube channel. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website. (Source)

On September 27th, the Library of Congress hosted a conference called Collections as Data in Washington, D.C. The conference website provides the following description for the event: “The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. […]MORE

Paleography Tips!

Posted by: on September 23, 2016   |Comment (1)|Digital Humanities

Leah Grandy, of the Loyalist Collection at the University of New Brunswick Libraries, has a few recent(-ish) posts on paleography, or deciphering historical handwriting. Grandy notes here that paleography training—previously thought to be necessary only for people studying medieval and early modern texts, which may be written in styles such as blackletter or secretary hand that they don’t necessarily encounter much in their modern lives—may also need to be extended to students and researchers of later centuries as well. Cursive, previously a staple of early education, is no longer taught in many schools, and as a result, undergrads are arriving at college who have trouble reading 18th-20th century handwritten primary sources. As someone who has deciphered written annotations for the Women Writers Project and sometimes transcribes documents on Shakespeare’s World for fun, I’m used to people recoiling in fear and/or disgust at the idea of facing down secretary hand, but it’s strange for me to think about people having a similar reaction to cursive!

In this post, Grandy offers a really helpful set of tips for reading or transcribing handwritten documents—whatever style they’re written in. Among them: comparing unclear letters/words to identifiable ones; looking up people and places; transcribing what you can identify and leaving blanks before coming back; guessing and going with your gut! If you’re a student or researcher dealing with handwritten primary sources, check it out.

Leah Grandy, of the Loyalist Collection at the University of New Brunswick Libraries, has a few recent(-ish) posts on paleography, or deciphering historical handwriting. Grandy notes here that paleography training—previously thought to be necessary only for people studying medieval and early modern texts, which may be written in styles such as blackletter or secretary hand […]MORE

Providence College Centennial Library Exhibit In Digital Commons

Posted by: on September 15, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

The Phillips Memorial Library is celebrating Providence College’s Centennial with a grand exhibition.  The exhibit was curated and installed by Special and Archival Collections, and photographed and archived by, Digital Publishing Services.  It features items on loan or donated by alumni that span the College’s first 100 years.  The exhibit is available through Digital Commons’ Image Gallery.  Items in this collection include: a basketball signed by the winners of the NIT Championship’s from 1961 and 1963, a Friars Club jacket circa 1964, and an address to the first Honorary Degree recipient given out at the school, General Armando Diaz, former Minister of War and Chief of Staff of the Italian Army from 1917-1924.  Check out the online exhibit or come visit the library to see it. The exhibit runs through the Fall semester of 2016.

pc_banner pc_football_photo

The Phillips Memorial Library is celebrating Providence College’s Centennial with a grand exhibition.  The exhibit was curated and installed by Special and Archival Collections, and photographed and archived by, Digital Publishing Services.  It features items on loan or donated by alumni that span the College’s first 100 years.  The exhibit is available through Digital Commons’ Image Gallery.  Items […]MORE

Personal Digital Archiving Faculty Workshop

Posted by: on September 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Trouble finding research or teaching materials on your computer? Overwhelmed with family photos? Not sure what “the cloud” even is?

PDA workspace computerJoin me on Tuesday, September 20 at 2:30 PM in the Phillips Memorial Library to learn some simple ways to start managing your digital life including tips for file naming, choosing file formats, and storage best practices.

I hope to see you there!

Can’t make it, but want to learn more? Check out this post from the Library of Congress blog, The Signal.

 

Trouble finding research or teaching materials on your computer? Overwhelmed with family photos? Not sure what “the cloud” even is? Join me on Tuesday, September 20 at 2:30 PM in the Phillips Memorial Library to learn some simple ways to start managing your digital life including tips for file naming, choosing file formats, and storage best practices. […]MORE

Digital Publishing Services Welcomes You!

Posted by: on September 1, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you:

  • scholarly communication and copyright
  • personal digital archiving and digital asset management
  • scanning and digitization
  • media creation
  • journal publishing
  • text encoding and other digital humanities tools
  • graphic design
  • data visualization

For assistance contact dps@providence.edu.  We wish you all the best this academic year!

Phillips Memorial Library, your Finals Week study haven. #pcgrad #gofriars #pc2017 #friargram #pc2019

A photo posted by Phillips Memorial Library (@clubphil_pc) on

It’s that time of year again- the campus is buzzing with beginning-of-semester activity and the library is no exception.  As one of the library’s primary service areas, Digital Publishing Services is here to help the PC community with a variety of needs.  Here are some areas that may be of use to you: scholarly communication […]MORE

Folger Digital Anthology is Live!

Posted by: on August 4, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The long-awaited (at least by me) Folger Digital Anthology has been released! The Folger Shakespeare Library, whose online texts of the Bard are something of a gold standard, announced a little while back that they’d also be releasing an online anthology of TEI-encoded non-Shakespearean plays from the early modern period. The collection includes 403 plays that were performed professionally between the 1576 construction of The Theatre, England’s first successful permanent theatre, and the 1642 closure of the theatres due to the English Civil War. Some of the plays are old chestnuts that already have a bunch of online transcriptions, but in browsing the genre categories (which include the comedies, tragedies, and histories familiar to fans of Shakespeare, but also tragicomedies, morality plays, classical legends, pseudo-histories, and more – Meaghan J. Brown, the project leader, discusses genre decisions here) I found some that, as far as I can tell, were not previously accessible to the general public online.

Here it is: A Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama

The long-awaited (at least by me) Folger Digital Anthology has been released! The Folger Shakespeare Library, whose online texts of the Bard are something of a gold standard, announced a little while back that they’d also be releasing an online anthology of TEI-encoded non-Shakespearean plays from the early modern period. The collection includes 403 plays […]MORE

Vatican Affliate Digitizes 1,600-Year-Old Illuminated Manuscript of the Aeneid

Posted by: on July 25, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.

DVL

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.MORE

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site […]MORE

Theology Collections Portal

Posted by: on July 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Posey_Image2If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the kiosk according to their research goals.  Options include:

  • Find Scholarly Sources for a Paper (articles, ebooks, specific journal titles)
  • Explore Theology Topics (major religions, Thomas Aquinas, Catholicism and Catholic social thought)
  • Find Bibles and Biblical Commentary
  • Get Research Help
  • Provide Feedback

Kiosk content is presented via a content management system (CMS) called Scalar.  Scalar provides a platform for the creation of rich, digital publications that integrate text and media using a variety of flexible templates.  A signature design element in Scalar is the ability to create multiple narrative paths through a work.  This path functionality made Scalar an ideal CMS for the creation of the theology kiosk content.  Additionally, Scalar presents built-in visualization tools, which allow creators to explore and adjust the relationships between content in different ways.   Scalar is supported by the Alliance for Networked Visual Culture.

You are welcome to explore the Theology Collections Portal online as well as at the iPad kiosk in the library.  Please do contact us with questions or suggestions-  our primary goal is to make the kiosk as helpful as possible for our researchers and your feedback is greatly valued!

 

If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the […]MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the […]MORE

“Hamilton” and Digital Humanities

Posted by: on June 24, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The musical Hamilton, winner of a slew of awards including (most recently) 11 Tonys, has gained notice as a vehicle for educating children and teens about the early history of the United States. Public interest in the Founding Fathers’ lives and views is high — at the moment, Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography of Alexander Hamilton is at the top of the NYT’s paperback nonfiction bestseller list, where it has resided for 35 weeks, and also appears on the e-book nonfiction bestseller list, while Nathaniel Philbrick’s new book on George Washington has a place on the hardcover list. Some die-hard musical fans have moved beyond the Chernow biography into primary sources like Aaron Burr’s journals and John Laurens’s letters.

It’s not only the musical’s content that’s gained a spot in the public eye, though — its critical acclaim and widespread popularity have meant that DH-esque projects relating to its lyrics have attracted mainstream attention of a kind that similar projects on other subjects rarely get. Raplyzer, Eric Malmi’s 2015 program analyzing assonance and other rhymes in rap lyrics, was covered in a handful of sources as a light “computers, whatever will they do next” story — the non-specialist sources largely focused on the aspect of the project where the computer generated raps of its own, rather than on its analysis. (It goes without saying that rhyme analysis tools developed by literature scholars for poetry, like this one by Elise Thorsen and David J. Birnbaum, don’t even get that media attention.) Meanwhile, in 2016, Hamilton’s reputation led the Wall Street Journal itself to develop an algorithm similar to Malmi’s to use on the show’s lyrics; due to the show’s broad appeal, this was widely shared online.

Although the website Genius, a database of rap lyrics and other content with crowdsourced annotations, had been widely covered before its association with Hamilton, observers took particular note of the speed and thoroughness with which the site’s users marked up the show’s libretto. Genius’s strength, as it related to Hamilton specifically, lay in the breadth of knowledge of its crowdsourcing crowd: hip-hop aficionados picked up the references to Grandmaster Flash, Notorious B.I.G. and Jay-Z, fans coming from a musical theatre background noticed the shout-outs to South Pacific and The Last Five Years, and history buffs provided more context for details that are elided or come up only in passing, like the Battle of Fort Necessity, the Whiskey Rebellion, Hercules Mulligan’s slave Cato, or New York’s prominence in the 1770s. These annotations help a reader understand the musical both as a 21st-century document and as a narrative of the 18th-19th century.

Crowdsourced digital humanities projects frequently deal with much larger corpora than this, which need to be put into indexable form before they can be used by researchers. Such projects are therefore less subjective and less demanding of subject area knowledge. A selection of crowdsourced DH projects:

Hamilton fans who would like to read the title character’s writings can find them at Founders Online. A few that may be of interest:

  • “The Farmer Refuted”, actually far more eloquently insulting than its paraphrase in the musical
  • First preserved letter from Hamilton to Eliza Schuyler, his future wife, apologizing for having offered to drive her and a friend to a party before remembering that he was not a good enough driver to do so
  • Draft of an Opinion on the Constitutionality of an Act to Establish a Bank, one of Hamilton’s most noted political successes. This draft, with cross-outs and additions, is an interesting look at Hamilton’s thought process!
  • Letters between Hamilton and Aaron Burr (1, 2, 3, 4) leading up to their duel, signed — indeed — “I have the honor to be your obedient servant, A. Hamilton/A. Burr”
  • And many more!

The musical Hamilton, winner of a slew of awards including (most recently) 11 Tonys, has gained notice as a vehicle for educating children and teens about the early history of the United States. Public interest in the Founding Fathers’ lives and views is high — at the moment, Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography of Alexander Hamilton […]MORE

Hypothes.is

Posted by: on June 16, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and online resources easy for everyone to annotate. Annotations can be used to leave comments on specific lines of text (rather than in a comments section), provide citations, view what other researchers have commented, or take notes for personal use.

Hypothes.is is available as a bookmarklet, a Google Chrome extension, and as an addition to a website. For more information or to get started annotating, visit the Hypothes.is website.

Hypothes.is_logo

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and […]MORE

1,300-Year-Old Writings Inside Later Bookbindings

Posted by: on June 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of the time to cut up and recycle handwritten books from the middle ages following the invention of printing. Thanks to macro x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (MA-XRF), it has become possible to read these older texts used to create 15th through 18th century manuscripts without removing the bookbindings.

Read the full post “X-rays reveal 1,300-year-old writings inside later bookbindings” by Dalya Alberge at The Guardian, US Edition.

bookbinding-16th

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of […]MORE

Open Access Science Research in Europe

Posted by: on June 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. Rebecca’s professional focus is academic libraries, research and research education, and digital publishing. Rebecca will be providing more posts during her internship, so stay tuned!]

Recently, the Netherlands EU Presidency announced that all publicly-funded scientific research in Europe will be published as open access by 2020. They also released The “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science,” a document which lists the goals, steps, and benefits of open access in the sciences.

Releasing scientific research as open access articles will make new research more relevant and available to researchers, as well as interested citizens. Open science “has the potential to increase the quality and benefits of science by making it faster, more responsive to societal challenges, more inclusive and more accessible to new users” (“The Amsterdam Call for Action” 4, 2016). By making these articles freely available, new research can be read as soon it comes out by anyone who’s interested, rather than requiring access through a university after an embargo period or paid access to a single article. Open access in the sciences will also benefit those outside the science field. The Call for Action notes that by making research available to the public, entrepreneurs can use the findings to come up with new products and services.

A link to the full-text of the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science” is provided at European University Association News.

Open Science

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. […]MORE

Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection

Posted by: on June 2, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Digital Publishing Services recently added the Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection to our dpml.providence.edu site.

Edward P. Doyle, O.P., 1907-1997, was a member of the Providence College faculty from 1941-1954. During a leave of absence for military service Father Doyle served as a World War II U.S. Army Chaplain. As a member of the 104th Infantry Division, Father Doyle was present at the liberation of the concentration camp in Nordhausen, Germany.

The collection includes photographs, text documents, and a single audio file (including a link to the video from that audio file).  The focus of this collection is Father Doyle’s personal photographs from the liberation of the Nordhausen Concentration CampScreen Shot 2016-06-02 at 10.31.08 AM. These images are deeply disturbing, so caution is advised.

Digital Publishing Services recently added the Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection to our dpml.providence.edu site. Edward P. Doyle, O.P., 1907-1997, was a member of the Providence College faculty from 1941-1954. During a leave of absence for military service Father Doyle served as a World War II U.S. Army Chaplain. As a member of the 104th Infantry […]MORE

text analysis with Voyant Tools

Posted by: on May 26, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis.

Voyant logoVoyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for textual analysis.  Using the tool is easy.  Go to the site and link to or upload your text (the system accepts a wide variety of formats including PDF, XML, TEI, and more).  Once you ingest the text or corpus you are presented with a dashboard of visualizations and tools.  Some of the tools built into Voyant include: Cirrus, a word cloud generator; Summary, a helpful overview of the corpus; Mandala, a visualization that shows the relationship between terms and documents; and many more (explore Voyant’s helpful documentation for the full list of tools).  Another great feature is the ability to generate a URL for the entire corpus dashboard or specific visualizations which can then be linked to or embedded into web-based writing.

Voyant Tools creators Stéfan Sinclar (@sgsinclair) and Geoffrey Rockwell (@GeoffRockwell) have also written a book called Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities (2016, MIT Press).  Rusty on your Greek and wondering what “hermeneutic” means, anyway?  So was I.  Hermeneutic means interpretive or explanatory and comes from the Greek “hermenēus,” interpreter.   The book is accompanied by an extremely rich and helpful web site, Hermeneuti.ca, that uses Voyant to visualize and interpret the book’s content while providing examples of how humanities scholars might integrate textual analysis visualizations into their writing.   One interesting example is found in Now Analyze That! in which speeches on the topic of race by Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright are analyzed.

Text analysis has been part of the digital humanities toolkit for some time.  Voyant has been in existence since 2013 and several examples of how it has been used in digital pedagogy are available.  These include Brian Croxall’s (@briancroxall) discussion of using Voyant Tools to analyze Hemingway; an explanation of how Voyant Tools was used to analyze a corpus of runaway slave advertisements in the U.S. antebellum south as part of a digital history course at Rice University; and a recent write-up on ProfHacker.

I decided to play with Voyant Tools using the corpus of correspondence presented on our Dorr Letters Project site.  I zipped up all 61 TEI files, uploaded the zip file to Voyant Tools, and got this dashboard:

Voyant Dashboard

How cool!?  There is a lot to unpack in this data but I’ll highlight a couple of the things that most struck me:

  • the most used words in the corpus are: dorr, letter, constitution and state (I didn’t remove the TEI Header, introductory text, or follow-up questions included in our TEI so what shows up in the dashboard is not just representative of the letter content)
  • the second 30 letters in teh collection were written by “Anti-Dorrites.”  isolating that part of the corpus and then comparing it to those letters written by Dorr might be revealing
  • it would be interesting to select only those letters written by Dorr and analyze the frequency of certain terms to see if patterns arise over time in relation to Dorr’s political views (of course, this is a small corpus so broad generalizations are dangerous)

Voyant Tools is simple to use and extremely interesting- give it a try yourself!

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis. Voyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for textual analysis.  Using the tool is easy.  Go to the site and link to or upload your text (the system accepts a wide variety of formats including PDF, XML, TEI, and more).  Once you ingest […]MORE

Redressing Wikipedia’s Diversity Problem

Posted by: on April 22, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

A couple of weeks ago, I participated in Strong Voices, Indigenous Women, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. It was my first foray into Wikipedia editing, and I was a little intimidated. I knew that Wikipedia uses a special markup language that I wasn’t familiar with, and beyond that I was feeling the import of editing such a hugely popular and public information resource. I’m no expert – who am I to edit this content?

But as I chatted with some of the other participants, it was clear that I wasn’t alone. These feelings are not uncommon among new editors, but overcoming them is a key to righting a big problem with Wikipedia – the lack of diversity in Wikipedia’s scope and content that’s been widely attributed to an overwhelmingly homogeneous editor community. Wikipedia’s gender issue has gained particular attention over the past several years, but the problem goes far beyond that. If you’re not very familiar with these issues, Sara Boboltz provides an incisive overview. As she succinctly puts it, Wikipedia editors are “mainly technically inclined, English-speaking, white-collar men living in majority-Christian, developed countries in the Northern hemisphere.”

There are many theories as to why this is, including the burden that the technical knowledge and time required place on potential editors. For example, women in many communities have less free time to devote to work like this. Also, like much of the rest of the male-dominated internet, women are not always welcomed and are much more likely to face harassment in these spaces, which inherently discourages their participation.

Another big part of this problem is Wikipedia’s notability guideline, which says that a topic has to have “received significant coverage in reliable sources that are independent of the subject” in order to be included in Wikipedia. It’s one of the ways that Wikipedia tries to maintain the integrity of its content, but it’s not hard to see the perpetuating effect that this guideline has on the lack of coverage of historically disenfranchised groups of people in our documented history.

If Wikipedia’s aim is to compile “the sum of all human knowledge”, everyone should be represented in the editor community. And as Wikipedia continues to grow as one of the most popular websites in the world, and its content becomes increasingly visible and authoritative, this is increasingly crucial. For example, Google now pulls Wikipedia content into it’s biographical sidebar making the information even more prominent.

The good news is that the Wikimedia Foundation is keenly aware of this problem and dedicating resources toward correcting it. For example, in 2012 they released VisualEditor, a more user-friendly editing interface and they’ve also allocated funds to initiatives that are building content on under-represented communities and subjects, like Wikipedia edit-a-thons.

While events like edit-a-thons are very successful at introducing Wikipedia editing and creating a safe space for first-timers to learn, a problem this entrenched and complex will require long-term engagement from this new wave of editors. We all have a right, and I might also argue, a responsibility, to participate in the documentation of our collective knowledge and history, and for all its shortcomings, Wikipedia provides an amazing space for us to do just that. In the words of co-founder, Jimmy Wales, “See that link up there? ‘edit this page’. Go for it, it’s a wiki.”

Want to try your hand at editing Wikipedia? Check out this beginner’s guide. Want to organize an edit-a-thon at your institution? This how-to is a great place to start.

A couple of weeks ago, I participated in Strong Voices, Indigenous Women, a Wikipedia edit-a-thon at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. It was my first foray into Wikipedia editing, and I was a little intimidated. I knew that Wikipedia uses a special markup […]MORE

Europe’s Open Access Champions launches

Posted by: on April 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.

EOAC

SPARC Europe (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) has launched a new service – Europe’s Open Access Champions – focusing on highlighting those who are driving Open Access forward in Europe’s academic communities. These administrators and scholars share their personal views on what still needs to be done to achieve more Open Access.MORE

Beatles Anthology Now Available to Stream

Posted by: on April 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have just been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it was not until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, a release which included the band’s thirteen U.K. studio albums and four compilation sets.

Anthology, Volumes 1-3, originally released in 1995 and 1996, are compilation albums that include rarities, studio outtakes, and alternative versions of iconic tracks They have been remastered at Abbey Road Studios by the same engineers who worked on the 2009 reissue of the same set. All three albums are available now on Apple Music, Spotify, GooglePlay, Tidal, Deezer, and Rhapsody, as well as other platforms. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Several news outlets reported this week that the Beatles Anthology albums have just been released by Apple Records to digital streaming services worldwide. This is a significant development, as the Beatles’ music was long withheld from digital streaming services; it was not until December 2015 that the first of their catalog became available across platforms, […]MORE

Faculty Author Series: Fred Drogula

Posted by: on April 1, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The latest installment of the Faculty Author Series is now available. Fred DrogulaAssociate Professor of History, is the latest featured author. Drogula’s new book, Commanders & Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire, explores how concepts of authority, control over territory, and military power underwent continual transformation throughout the history of the Roman Republic. 

The latest installment of the Faculty Author Series is now available. Fred Drogula, Associate Professor of History, is the latest featured author. Drogula’s new book, Commanders & Command in the Roman Republic and Early Empire, explores how concepts of authority, control over territory, and military power underwent continual transformation throughout the history of the Roman Republic. MORE

Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies

Posted by: on March 18, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous issues not only in New England, but also in the United States and internationally”. The discussion centered on “the use of digital media to foster education, research, and outreach within Indigenous communities and studies.” There was a focus on how digital media and tools can help to create connections between people and materials, as well as the importance of relationship-building with Native communities, the ethics surrounding these projects, and project management issues of resource allocation, stewardship, and sustainability.

I was particularly impressed with Tobias Glaza and Paul Grant-Costa’s Yale Indian Papers Project. They focused on the importance of Indigenous communities as stakeholders in the project and collaborating with community members right from the beginning to answer questions like – What’s most important to the community? How do they tell their stories? What information should remain private? How do they want to access and use their digital history? With this approach, they published the New England Indian Papers Series – “a scholarly critical edition of New England Native American primary source materials gathered into one robust virtual collection.” Built on Yale’s Ladybird software and using a Blacklight front-end, the platform is clean and easy-to-use, and includes a document reader, scholarly transcription, and extensive metadata.

An eye-opening takeaway from Alyssa Mt. Pleasant’s presentation on the American Indian Studies (AIS) resources portal that she built at Yale, is the importance of maintaining a project’s stewardship to ensure its longevity. Unfortunately, the AIS portal, which took 3 years to build, wasn’t taken on by anyone else when she left Yale, and consequently, is no longer accessible.

Lisa Brooks from Amherst College gave a fantastic talk on the problem of trying to understand the history of Native spaces when the main existing reference points are colonial maps. She’s worked extensively on creating new historical maps of Indigenous spaces to support her research and is also engaged in the idea of maps as storytelling, often combining her maps with present-day photos of the locations to bring them to life. Her work is included in Amherst’s digital map collection, which was created using Esri’s ArcGIS platform, and is definitely worth checking out.

Another standout was Dana Leibsohn’s project, Vistas, which “seeks to bring an understanding of the visual culture of Spanish America to a broad audience.” Vistas was designed as a non-linear platform, in an effort to encourage multiple pathways between content that would support research in a variety of scholarly disciplines, as well as less formal modes of education and learning. Launched in the late 90’s, Vistas has undergone three major evolutions, from a website hosted by Smith College, to a DVD, and now back to an online version hosted by Fordham University. Dr. Leibsohn’s stewardship of the project over the years has clearly been integral to its longevity, which includes her commitment to tackling the challenges of migrating the platform to keep up with ever-evolving technologies.

There were also a couple of great discussions surrounding endangered Native languages, including a conversation on the power of digital activism to increase online, and particularly social media usage of these languages, as a way of preserving them.

Obviously all of these projects are contributing to content-collection, digital preservation, and scholarship needs, but it was great to hear that so many are focused on supporting Indigenous communities by facilitating access to their histories, preserving them, and ultimately, helping to amplify the voices of these communities.

A couple of weeks ago, I attended a fantastic roundtable on Digital Futures of Indigenous Studies in the Digital Scholarship Lab at Brown University’s John D. Rockefeller Library. The event was “part of an ongoing initiative at the JCB to encourage and support a new generation of scholars and community members as they build consciousness about Indigenous […]MORE

Paul Klee’s Notebooks Online

Posted by: on March 11, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.

Klee-Notebooks

Recently, the Zentrum Paul Klee, a museum dedicated to the artist Paul Klee, located in Bern, Switzerland made available online almost all 3,900 pages of Klee’s personal notebooks, which he used as the source for his Bauhaus teaching between 1921 and 1931.MORE

The 120 Minutes Digital Archive

Posted by: on March 3, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights
Source

Photo via Source

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands and artists. In May of 2003, the show was canceled without formal announcement, with the final episode co-hosted by Jim Shearer, the host at the time, and past hosts Dave Kendall and Matt Pinfield. The show made a brief return to MTV2 under the name 120 Minutes with Matt Pinfield in 2011, but was canceled for good shortly after in 2013. The 120 Minutes digital archive is the product of a collaboration between its founder, identified as Tyler (no last name), and a team of volunteers. The archive does not present each episode in its original recorded form, but rather, lists the videos contained within each episode (and links out to their YouTube versions) and notes hosts and guest artists by episode. Visitors can view the archival listings by year and episode; the site is presented in a tiered layout, with years listed at the top of each page that expand down into episode listings.

Source – the Cramps on 120 Minutes

During its tenure, 120 Minutes was hosted by a slew of notable guest artists, including Iggy Pop, Bob Mould, Lou Reed, Robert Smith (the Cure), Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman (Operation Ivy/Rancid), Superchunk, and Weezer. It featured interviews with the likes of Joe Strummer, the Cramps, John Lydon, Sonic Youth, and Mojo Nixon; spotlights on bands and artists like Bauhaus, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and Sisters of Mercy; and live performances by the Dead Milkmen, the Pixies, and Helmet.

The show aired thousands of videos, featuring artists like the Pogues, the Stone Roses, Hüsker Dü, Billy Bragg, John Doe, Big Audio Dynamite, PiL, the English Beat, X, Anti-Nowhere League, Descendents, the Mighty Lemon Drops, Ministry, the Smithereens, the Ramones, Nick Cave, Dinosaur Jr., Charlatans UK, and TSOL. Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” made its world premiere on 120 Minutes, but was quickly moved to daytime rotation due to popularity. To check out the archive, please visit the site here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

New to the online world is an extensive digital archive of MTV’s late night show, 120 Minutes. The show, which ran from 1986 through 2000 without cessation, and later on MTV2 from 2001-2003, was the 2-hour alternative music block that ran after hours and featured videos, interviews, and performances by alternative, underground, and fringe bands […]MORE

Photogrammar

Posted by: on February 29, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Yale University, through a National Endowment for the Humanities grant (NEH), created a beautiful online database called Photogrammar for searching, organizing and visualizing over 170,000 photographs from 1935-1945.  The photographs were created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).  This web-based platform uses various ways to interact with this content, including a map of the United States that can organize the photographs by photographer and where the photographs were taken.  There are Photogrammar Labs, which include a Treemap: “a three-tier classification starting with 12 main subject headings (ex. THE LAND), then 1300 sub-headings (ex. Mountains, Deserts, Foothills, Plains) and then sub-sub headings. 88,000 photographs were assigned classifications,” and a Metadata Platform: “an interactive dashboard showing the relationship between date, county, photographer, and subject in photographs from individual states. The dashboard is still in development, but California is now available.” Coming soon will be a ColorSpace lab, which explores “the 17,000 color photographs based on hue, saturation and lightness.”

A great resource for educators, researchers, students and the public alike.Screen Shot 2016-02-26 at 10.35.26 AM

Yale University, through a National Endowment for the Humanities grant (NEH), created a beautiful online database called Photogrammar for searching, organizing and visualizing over 170,000 photographs from 1935-1945.  The photographs were created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI).  This web-based platform uses various ways to interact with this content, including […]MORE

Engaging Users and Remixing Content: New York Public Library’s Digital Collections

Posted by: on February 12, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic views of the U.S., but as I delved deeper, I discovered all of the exciting tools and initiatives that they’ve integrated into the collections to encourage discovery, interaction, sharing, research, and reuse. In particular, I’ve been musing on the fantastic visual browsing tool. Data visualization is still often thought of simply as a graphic, sometimes interactive, representation of statistics and other data, but it also clearly has so much potential as a tool for discovery, by helping users to better understand the scope of the information that they’re searching or exploring.

A thousand skaters, Central Park

Strohmeyer & Wyman, “A thousand skaters, Central Park” (1889), stereoscopic image (via NYPL)

Beyond content visualization, NYPL is championing active user/content engagement with the Digital Collections API, a Remix Residency program and other tools from the creative folks at NYPL Labs, like The Green Book trip planner, which uses “locations extracted from mid-20th century motor guides that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, and other destinations where Black travelers would be welcome.”

For those of us who spend most of our days in the weeds of content management, NYPL’s Digital Collections initiatives are a great reminder to think innovatively about how we can better connect and engage users with digital collections.

For some Friday fun, check out their Stereogranimator and create some 3D images!

As I’ve begun settling into Providence after my move from New York, I’m finally having some time to catch up on my library news. I had heard about NYPL’s recent release of more than 180,000 public domain items from their digital collections, including the first known photography by a woman and more than 40,000 stereoscopic […]MORE

Digging Deeper into University Opposition to Open Educational Resources (OER)

Posted by: on February 4, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Recently Elliot Harmon from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) contributed a post to EFF’s blog. Harmon explores the university opposition to open educational resources paradox: “… universities’ opposition to open licensing has nothing to do with students’ access to educational resources. What’s really playing out is a longstanding fight over how universities use patents—more specifically, software patents. Open education just happens to be caught in the crossfire.”

For Harmon’s complete analysis, read “Why Are Universities Fighting Open Education?

social-oer

Recently Elliot Harmon from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) contributed a post to EFF’s blog. Harmon explores the university opposition to open educational resources paradox: “… universities’ opposition to open licensing has nothing to do with students’ access to educational resources. What’s really playing out is a longstanding fight over how universities use patents—more specifically, software […]MORE

2016 MediaHub Updates

Posted by: on January 27, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

MHBWIf you have not yet heard or made use of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer. The MediaHub is a multimedia center located on the first floor of the library, which aims to assist and inspire Providence College’s students, faculty, staff in their digital media-inclusive work. Stationary equipment is located within the space and loanable equipment is available upon request from the Circulation Desk, located next to the library’s front entrance. Specialized assistance is available from the Digital Publishing Services Lab.

Static equipment includes five high-end iMac computers, equipped with a variety of media hardware and software, including iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, Audacity, Lynda.com, and GarageBand; three lockboxes for equipment with plexiglass windows and multiple cable knockouts; specialized audio recording equipment; and Epson scanners. Loanable equipment includes video cameras, digital cameras, drawing tablets, green screen lighting kits, portable digital audio recorders, MIDI keyboards, and microphones, and peripherals to aid in use and storage including tripods, external hard drives, memory cards, headphones, and cables. Loanable equipment has a loan time of 7 days. For more information, please visit Digital Publishing Services’ MediaHub webpage, where you can view a comprehensive online catalog of equipment, listing of item availability, image gallery, and tutorials.

If you have not yet heard or made use of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons’ MediaHub, we would like to take this opportunity to introduce you to the space and what it has to offer. The MediaHub is a multimedia center located on the first floor of the library, which aims to assist and inspire Providence […]MORE

Pillars of the Dominican Order: St. Dominic de Guzman & St. Thomas Aquinas – Library Exhibit

Posted by: on January 22, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources
preview

St. Thomas Aquinas (Reproduction), Artist: Sandro Botticelli, ca. 1481-82

DPS is proud to share that a digital version of the library’s current exhibit – Pillars of the Dominican Order: St. Dominic de Guzman & St. Thomas Aquinas- is now available through Digital Commons here.

Almost eight hundred years ago, in December of 1216, the birth of a new religious order also took place. Father Dominic de Guzman, a Spanish priest, petitioned Pope Honorius II successfully for a new religious order, which would come to be called the Order of Preachers. Founded to preach the Gospel and to combat heresy, the teaching activity of the order and its scholastic organization placed the Preachers in the forefront of the intellectual life of the Middle Ages. The catapult for this success was the very same Dominic de Guzman who had petitioned the Pope. In honor of this divine historical event and to celebrate the beginning of a new chapter in the life of the Catholic Church, this year’s Christmas Exhibit focuses on two pillars of the Dominican Order, St. Dominic de Guzman and St. Thomas Aquinas.

The exhibit consists of reproduction paintings by early renaissance artists, such as Diego Velazquez, Fra Angelico, Sandro Botticelli, and others depicting various scenes of the two Saints. In addition, the exhibit features the College’s 1632 printed edition of Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologica, of which only a handful of copies are still in existence today. There is also one case in the exhibit highlighting the life of St. Martin De Porres, patron saint of mixed-race people, barbers, innkeepers, public health workers, and all those seeking racial harmony.

This exhibit celebrates the birth of our Savior, the coming eight hundredth year anniversary of the Dominican brotherhood, and the blessings these Saints have brought into the world as seen through the eyes of Renaissance artists.

You can also visit our previous library exhibits through Digital Commons here.

 

 

 

DPS is proud to share that a digital version of the library’s current exhibit – Pillars of the Dominican Order: St. Dominic de Guzman & St. Thomas Aquinas- is now available through Digital Commons here. Almost eight hundred years ago, in December of 1216, the birth of a new religious order also took place. Father […]MORE

DPS Welcomes Elizabeth Schneider

Posted by: on January 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a User Relations Manager and Technical Services Lead.  Elizabeth brings a wealth of knowledge about digital asset management systems and metadata to the department.  In her new role as Digital Publishing Services Specialist Elizabeth will work on digitization projects, assist in the management of our Digital Commons and Islandora repositories, collaborate with faculty in the creation of SelectedWorks pages, and contribute to a variety of cross-library initiatives.  Welcome Elizabeth!

We are glad to welcome the newest member of the Digital Publishing Services Team- Elizabeth Schneider.  Elizabeth earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History at the University of Michigan and her Master’s of Library and Information Studies degree from McGill University.  For the past several years Elizabeth has worked at Artstor- most recently as a […]MORE

Open Library of Humanities

Posted by: on December 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

From About OLH page:

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.

The OLH publishing platform supports academic journals from across the humanities disciplines, as well as hosting its own multidisciplinary journal. Launched as an international network of scholars, librarians, programmers and publishers in January 2013, the OLH has received two substantial grants from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to date, and has built a sustainable business model with its partner libraries.

All of our academic articles are subject to rigorous peer review and the scholarship we publish showcases some of the most dynamic research taking place in the humanities disciplines today – from classics, modern languages and cultures, philosophy, theology and history, to political theory, sociology, anthropology, film and new media studies, and digital humanities. Our articles benefit from the latest advances in online journal publishing – with high-quality presentation, annotative functionality, robust digital preservation, strong discoverability and easy-to-share social media buttons.

Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

olh-homepage-resized

From About OLH page: The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the […]MORE

Library of Congress Passes New Exemption to Copyright Law

Posted by: on November 25, 2015   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against the theft of intellectual property, and it renews and expands protections for fair use. Request for the exemption comes in reaction to a law that forbids users from breaking Digital Rights Management (DRM), as users often have to circumvent DRM to make full use of their devices. DRM is, “a term referring to various access control technologies that are used to restrict the usage of proprietary software, hardware, or content. DRM includes technologies that control the use, modification, and distribution of copyrighted works, as well as systems within devices that enforce these policies.” (source)

Proponents of DRM argue that it is necessary to prevent intellectual property from being duplicated, helps copyright holders maintain artistic control, and ensures continued revenue streams. Conversely, opponents to DRM argue that there is no evidence that it helps prevent copyright infringement, serves only to inconvenience customers, and helps big business stifle innovation and competition. The exemptions will go into effect in 2016 and are up for review and approval again in 3 years. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

On October 28th, the Library of Congress passed a new exemption to copyright law, which allows consumers to jailbreak their tablets, computers, automobile software, and Blu-ray devices without fear of having legal action brought against them. This exemption is an upgrade to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Section 1201), which is designed to protect against […]MORE

SelectedWorks is Getting an Upgrade

Posted by: on November 20, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

 SelectedWorks, the faculty webpage builder from Bepress, is receiving an upgrade very soon! Digital Publishing ServicesScreen Shot 2015-11-20 at 11.29.16 AM will be trained and updated on the exciting new features.  In the meantime, have a look at Providence College’s present SelectedWorks site.

Stay tuned!

 SelectedWorks, the faculty webpage builder from Bepress, is receiving an upgrade very soon! Digital Publishing Services will be trained and updated on the exciting new features.  In the meantime, have a look at Providence College’s present SelectedWorks site. Stay tuned!MORE

#ReCollectingRI: The Dorr Letters

Posted by: on November 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

What does the past mean to you?  What comes to your mind when you think of Rhode Island history?  These questions are at the heart of the #ReCollectingRI project, an effort of the Rhode Island Historical Society to engage all Rhode Islanders with our past.

Here at the Phillips Memorial Library one of our digital collections presents a very interesting glimpse into Rhode Island history.  For that reason, we share our Dorr Letters to #ReCollectingRI.

2015-11-09_1013The Dorr Letters web site currently presents 60 letters written to and from Thomas Wilson Dorr around the time of the Dorr Rebellion in 1842.  The letters present an important glimpse into how this critical event unfolded.  You can view the original manuscripts on the site, or read their transcriptions.  The site also provides contextual information about many of the important peoples and places that show up in the letters.

For more on #ReCollectingRI visit: http://www.rihs.org/recollectingri/ or check out the the hashtag on Facebook and TwitterWhat will you add?

 

What does the past mean to you?  What comes to your mind when you think of Rhode Island history?  These questions are at the heart of the #ReCollectingRI project, an effort of the Rhode Island Historical Society to engage all Rhode Islanders with our past. Here at the Phillips Memorial Library one of our digital […]MORE

Guest Post: Russell Franks on Infrared Photography

Posted by: on November 4, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College. 

PC_infrared_0502Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us with vital subtle clues and information about the world around us.

But there is another part of the light spectrum – infrared light – that we cannot see. We know it exists; scientists quantified it over one hundred years ago, but we can’t perceive it naturally without the aid of specialized recording equipment, such as a camera.

Infrared light lies between the visible and microwave portions (think microwave oven) of the electromagnetic spectrum. It also has a range of wavelengths, just like visible light has wavelengths that reflect the colors red to violet. The “near” infrared light spectrum, which is closest to the color red, is just beyond what we naturally see and “far” infrared is closest to the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

PC_infrared_0183My curiosity in infrared photography began during my analog camera days. In the pre-digital world infrared imaging required infrared sensitive film, an infrared filter for the camera lens, and a complicated focusing method since light in the infrared range focuses differently than the visible light we normally see.

However, my fascination with infrared imagery deepened upon realizing infrared photography extended the perception of my reality and my understanding in that there is more to see than what we actually see. The sense of other worldliness that infrared imagery suggests stretches the logic of my imagination in how I see mankind and nature interact with each other. This “through the lens” altered perception has even invaded my daily life. Every day I am confronted with various scenes that beg to be photographed in infrared to magically reveal the unseen play of light. This is just one part of nature I seek to explore through the medium of the lens.

As an artist, the infrared journey has been filled with surprise, frustration, and immense satisfaction, but more importantly this unveiling of the unseen natural world to the naked eye has permanently changed how I visually perceive my surroundings.

In the days of analog photography, infrared imagery was usually thought of as a specialized art form reserved for professionals. However, with the advent of digital photography, infrared imaging has become much easier and less expensive in the long run – not to mention a lot more FUN! True, having your digital camera converted for a few hundred dollars to “see” the infrared spectrum might be considered extravagant, but well worth it if you want to view the world – literally – in a different light.

This is a guest post by Russell Franks, Librarian for Special and Archival Collections at Providence College.  Our eyes are truly a wonderful part of our being. As a window on the world, our eyes are capable of distinguishing as much as 10 million different hues and shades of color, all of which provide us […]MORE

Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist (Open Position)

Posted by: on November 3, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

PML_fron_Fall_2015

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development of digital information content and presentation tools and services.

You can review the complete position description, essential duties, position requirement and apply here.

The Phillips Memorial Library, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island is seeking applicants for a Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist. Reporting to the Digital Publishing Services Coordinator, the Commons Digital Publishing Services Specialist provides technical and logistical support for College faculty, students, and staff in all aspects of digital publishing services, including systems support, digitization, and development […]MORE

Rolling Stone Magazine Archive Available Now via Google Play

Posted by: on October 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free. In collaboration with Google Play, the archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and cultural reporting Rolling Stone has generated through time. The archive can be accessed via the Google Play Newsstand app on both iOS and Android devices. Articles by notable writers, including David Fricke, Hunter S. Thompson, and Cameron Crowe, and imagery by Annie Leibovitz and David LaChapelle, are among the content featured. Rolling Stone’s daily news and coverage is available via the app, as well. Alongside the archive, Rolling Stone has introduced a feature on their website called CoverWall, which offers an immersive experience of the publication’s content, including every iconic cover from their 48-year tenure and extensive archival content. They follow in the footsteps of publications like WIRED and the New York Times with this immersive feature, which is noteworthy, as Rolling Stone was slow to enter into digital format. Gus Wenner, Head of Digital of Wenner Media notes that, “This collaboration is as much about our history as it is our future.” Brian Irving, global head of marketing for Google Play adds, “Rolling Stone produced some of the most iconic music and political coverage in America for the past five decades. We’re proud to offer this rich history to people for free, where they can explore and interact with every issue… It’s like a highway of information, revisited.” (Sources: 1, 2)

In January of this year, Rolling Stone Magazine released a vast digital archive of their content to the public for free. In collaboration with Google Play, the archive begins with their 1967 launch and spans five decades. Every issue ever published is available, providing viewers with open access to the wealth of musical, political, and […]MORE

DPS goes to Islandora Camp!

Posted by: on October 14, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Digital Publishing Services will be traveling to Hartford, CT next week to attend Islandora Camp!

Islandora is a digital asset management system that combines a Fedora back end and a Drupal front end.  DPS is thrilled to begin using Islandora to manage and present our assets.  Our attendance at Islandora Camp will help us develop the technical and metadata skills needed to begin our implementation. 

Some of the highlights of the camp include: Solr for Admin,  Building Digital Archive Collections with Islandora, and Shaping your Workflow: Creating Custom Ingest Workflows Using Islandora Webform.  The camp will be held from October 20 – 22 in Hartford, CT, at the UCONN Graduate Business Learning Center.

We are looking forward to telling you all about it!Screen Shot 2015-10-14 at 11.20.01 AM

Digital Publishing Services will be traveling to Hartford, CT next week to attend Islandora Camp! Islandora is a digital asset management system that combines a Fedora back end and a Drupal front end.  DPS is thrilled to begin using Islandora to manage and present our assets.  Our attendance at Islandora Camp will help us develop the technical […]MORE

U.S. Department of Education to Hire Open Education Adviser

Posted by: on October 8, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources
OER image

adapted from an image by Kevin Mearso posted on the Open Knowledge Flickr stream

Open educational resources (OERs) are teaching, learning, and research resources that are freely available for re-use (and often remixing).  OERs come in a variety of formats including course materials or modules, textbooks, videos, assessment tools, or digital exhibits.  There are several growing repositories of OERs including: OER Commons and MERLOT.

As OERs become more widely available they are gaining currency as worthwhile teaching tools that present cost savings to schools and students.  The U.S. Department of Education recently announced that they will hire and open education adviser.  The adviser will work to connect educators from both K-12 schools and higher ed with OERs that can be integrated into their curricula.

Read the Department of Ed press release here

Open educational resources (OERs) are teaching, learning, and research resources that are freely available for re-use (and often remixing).  OERs come in a variety of formats including course materials or modules, textbooks, videos, assessment tools, or digital exhibits.  There are several growing repositories of OERs including: OER Commons and MERLOT. As OERs become more widely […]MORE

Cultural Institutions Embrace Crowdsourcing

Posted by: on October 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

A recent post on the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Blog, The Signal by Mike Ashenfelder takes a look at crowdsourcing’s value to library and cultural heritage digital projects. Citizen volunteers can participate in activities such as analyzing images, creating tags and metadata, subtitling videos, transcribing documents, correcting OCR’d (optical character recognition) text and more. Ashenfelder provides several international examples of digital projects that leverage the power of citizen volunteer participation.

For the complete post click here.

A recent post on the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Blog, The Signal by Mike Ashenfelder takes a look at crowdsourcing’s value to library and cultural heritage digital projects. Citizen volunteers can participate in activities such as analyzing images, creating tags and metadata, subtitling videos, transcribing documents, correcting OCR’d (optical character recognition) text and more. […]MORE

The Happy Birthday song is now, finally, public domain

Posted by: on September 26, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A legal battle spanning two world wars, 8 track to mp3 players is finally over. Warner/Chappel’s lucrative ($2 million a year!) copyright ownership claim is struck down in court.

Happy Birthday

Warner/Chappel will no longer be able to charge royalties to filmmakers, artists, and many other for profit ventures for using the classic Happy Birthday song. Judge King ruled that the original copyright of the song covered only the piano arrangement and not the entirety of the song. This ends a decades long legal battle between Warner/Chappel and independent filmmakers and artists.

Until now, Warner has asked for royalties from anyone who wanted to sing or play “Happy Birthday to You” — with the lyrics — as part of a profit-making enterprise. Royalties were most often collected from stage productions, television shows, movies or greeting cards. But even those who wanted to sing the song publicly as part of a business, say a restaurant owner giving out free birthday cake to patrons, technically had to pay to use the song, prompting creative renditions at chain eateries trying to avoid paying royalties.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-happy-birthday-song-lawsuit-decision-20150922-story.html

 

A legal battle spanning two world wars, 8 track to mp3 players is finally over. Warner/Chappel’s lucrative ($2 million a year!) copyright ownership claim is struck down in court. Warner/Chappel will no longer be able to charge royalties to filmmakers, artists, and many other for profit ventures for using the classic Happy Birthday song. Judge […]MORE

Jerry Lewis Archive to be Preserved by Library of Congress

Posted by: on September 17, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Photo by Don Ornitz
Globe Photos, Inc.

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; home movies of Lewis at work and play; fully scripted motion pictures produced by Lewis at home; and rare footage of Martin and Lewis doing their nightclub act, among other material. Lewis himself will be present to perform at the opening event, “An Evening with Jerry Lewis”, on October 9th at Culpeper’s State Theatre. The Packard Campus houses collections for other comedians as well, including Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx, Johnny Carson, Bob Hope, and Sid Caesar. For more about the Library of Congress’s collections, please visit loc.gov. (Sources: 1, 2)

The Library of Congress announced Monday that it is set to house a large Jerry Lewis archive at the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia. The collection is slated to include: Prints and pre-prints of Lewis’ most popular films; test footage of costumes, makeup, camera, and actor screen tests from leading films; […]MORE

Freshmen: Then and Now Exhibit

Posted by: on September 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Welcome, Class of 2019! The library’s Special and Archival Collections department has thoughtfully curated an exhibit dedicated entirely to PC freshmen over the years.  The exhibit is called: Freshmen: Then and Now.  You can visit the physical exhibit, located in the glass cases next to ‘The Pit.” But you can also conveniently browse the online exhibit as well.  The exhibit is included as part of our Digital Commons Exhibits and Events page.

Enjoy browsing what the freshmen experience has been like over the years!

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Welcome, Class of 2019! The library’s Special and Archival Collections department has thoughtfully curated an exhibit dedicated entirely to PC freshmen over the years.  The exhibit is called: Freshmen: Then and Now.  You can visit the physical exhibit, located in the glass cases next to ‘The Pit.” But you can also conveniently browse the online exhibit […]MORE

Welcome Fall 2015!

Posted by: on September 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Greetings, and welcome (or welcome back) to campus.  We are very glad to see you!  Below you’ll find a couple of quick pointers to help you start the semester off smoothly.

original photo from flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dLJU1F

original photo from flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dLJU1F

Get Help Fast

Need a book?  Have a research question?  Need access to an article?  You can reach a librarian quickly via:

text: 401-484-7004

email: askalibrarian@lists.providence.edu

phone: 401-865-1993

DPS Can Help

DPS stands for Digital Publishing Services.  We are a department within the library that can assist you with the following:

  • scanning and digitization
  • multimedia creation (including software tutorials and/or access to hardware such as video cameras, microphones, etc.)
  • information about Digital Commons, PC’s institutional repository
  • consultation around how to integrate digital humanities methodologies into your research

For help with any of the above leave a comment below or contact us at dps@providence.edu.  Wishing you a great semester!

Greetings, and welcome (or welcome back) to campus.  We are very glad to see you!  Below you’ll find a couple of quick pointers to help you start the semester off smoothly. Get Help Fast Need a book?  Have a research question?  Need access to an article?  You can reach a librarian quickly via: text: 401-484-7004 […]MORE

NYPL Now Loaning WiFi Hotspots

Posted by: on August 6, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Tony Marx, director of the New York Public Library, has recently secured funding for a project that will allow the NYPL to offer it’s patrons free Wi-Fi hotstpot devices. Marx has been known for his vision of a more accessible library.

We’re human beings. We’re social animals. Even if you don’t need to come to the library to read a book, people come to the library to be together and to be in inspiring spaces

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/arianna-huffington-tony-marx-nypl_559aca67e4b0759e2b50e20b

Learn more about the Library HotSpot here: http://hotspot.nypl.org/

If you’d like to learn more about Tony Marx, and the NYPL, check out his talk with Arianna Huffington at the Aspen Ideas Festival.

Tony Marx, director of the New York Public Library, has recently secured funding for a project that will allow the NYPL to offer it’s patrons free Wi-Fi hotstpot devices. Marx has been known for his vision of a more accessible library. We’re human beings. We’re social animals. Even if you don’t need to come to […]MORE

Andy Warhol Became First Modern Digital Artist 30 Years Ago this July

Posted by: on July 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

warhol-debbie-harryAccording to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a portrait of Debbie Harry, of the band Blondie, and essentially created a new form of modern art. According to Burmon, Warhol’s interest in computer graphics could be traced back to an introduction to them (alongside Keith Haring) by Steve Jobs at Sean Lennon’s ninth birthday party, which happened less than a year before the Amiga 1000 presentation. To learn more about Warhol’s pursuit of digital art, please visit the article here.

According to a new article written by Andrew Burmon for Inverse.com, Andy Warhol became the first modern digital artist 30 years ago this month. On July 23, 1985, Commodore Business Machines revealed at Lincoln Center the Amiga 1000, a personal computer designed for graphics. Andy Warhol used the computer and ProPaint V27 to create a […]MORE

Fales Library at New York University acquires Triple Canopy archive

Posted by: on July 22, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

The well known New York art journal Triple Canopy has agreed to host it’s archive at the Fales Library at New York University. The journal has been published (mostly online, though some print versions do exist) since 2007. Triple Canopy is a part of Common Practice New York and publishes physical art as well has performances and artist talks.

Browsers update, links rot and standards evolve – often at a rapid pace,” said Ms. Resnick, who initiated talks with the library about the unusual agreement. In an interview, she added: “For digital preservation you really have to be doing it and thinking about it all the time. And we just felt that it was completely beyond our capabilities.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/07/20/n-y-u-library-acquires-archive-of-the-digital-art-journal-triple-canopy/

 

The well known New York art journal Triple Canopy has agreed to host it’s archive at the Fales Library at New York University. The journal has been published (mostly online, though some print versions do exist) since 2007. Triple Canopy is a part of Common Practice New York and publishes physical art as well has performances […]MORE

New Epson Scanner for DPS Lab

Posted by: on July 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

The DPS Lab has a new addition: an Epson Expression 11000xl Flatbed Scanner!  With a scanning area of 12.2″ x 17.2″ it can handle most of our project requests in the lab.  It also comes with a transparency head for scanning photo negatives of various sizes.  This multi-faceted scanner will handle the bulk of the DPS Lab’s projects, along with our two Microtek flatbed scanners, and the Atiz cradle scanner.

Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 9.42.55 AM

The DPS Lab has a new addition: an Epson Expression 11000xl Flatbed Scanner!  With a scanning area of 12.2″ x 17.2″ it can handle most of our project requests in the lab.  It also comes with a transparency head for scanning photo negatives of various sizes.  This multi-faceted scanner will handle the bulk of the […]MORE

‘Oligarchy’ of publishers

Posted by: on July 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Recently CBC News provided a report on a study published in PLoS One about the academic publishing industry.

Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein and Philippe Mongeon, co-authors of the study found that research publishing houses have typical profit margins of nearly 40%, whereas traditional book and magazine publishers are struggling to stay afloat. Additionally, the study authors found that the five largest, for-profit academic publishers now publish 53% of scientific papers in the natural and medical sciences; and in the social sciences, the top five publishers publish 70% of papers.

Recently CBC News provided a report on a study published in PLoS One about the academic publishing industry. Vincent Larivière, Stefanie Haustein and Philippe Mongeon, co-authors of the study found that research publishing houses have typical profit margins of nearly 40%, whereas traditional book and magazine publishers are struggling to stay afloat. Additionally, the study authors found that […]MORE

DC comics coming to Hoopla

Posted by: on July 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured fashion, waiting to gauge how well they sell in more traditional markets before hosting them in the library.

Hoopla users will be able to borrow 25 of DC Entertainment’s top titles including Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Watchmen, Superman: Earth One, V for Vendetta, Final Crisis and Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Blood. Whether you’re a hardcore comic fan or just want to catch up on some of the best stories DC has ever published, it’s a pretty nice list of graphic novels.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/25/hoopla-dc-comics/

 

Learn more about Hoopla

For the first time, DC has partnered with the digital public library, Hoopla.  Their partnership will bring 25 of their top titles to the library. Comics will be added periodically, and a spokesperson from Hoopla claims there will eventually be over 200 available. DC will initially release titles on Hoopla in a bit of a measured […]MORE

Apple & Google Play Announce New Digital Music Streaming Services

Posted by: on June 24, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

1

This week, both Apple and Google Play launch their new music streaming services. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch for June 30th.

Apple’s service made news this week when the company came under fire, most notably in an open letter penned by Taylor Swift, who accused the company of intending to stiff artists on royalties owed to them during the service’s 3-month free streaming trial period. They have since reconsidered the decision and announced that they will be compensating artists via (Apple Senior Vice President) Eddy Cue’s twitter account.

Unlike Spotify, neither service allows you to select the songs playing. Google Play Product Manager, Elias Roman, says that he believes many people will not mind, as consumers are after an effortless experience. The company is relying on the behind-the-scenes work of actual people, who hand select and curate available playlists; algorithms only come into play after a radio station (based on an artist or song) has been chosen. Apple’s philosophy is similar: Their service claims to offer an “old-fashioned human-curated music playlist for the digital age,” and Apple’s music chief Jimmy Iovine says that algorithms alone “can’t do that emotional task.”

Subscribing to Google Play allows you to take playlists offline – as well as manipulate, edit, and rename – and listen without interruption. Apple will be offering their service for free for the first 3 months and will offer individual and family premium plans after that time. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

This week, both Apple and Google Play launch their new music streaming services. In a possible effort to lure paid subscribers, Google has launched their service ahead of Apple, with Apple’s service set to launch for June 30th. Apple’s service made news this week when the company came under fire, most notably in an open […]MORE

UK Launches First Fully OA University Press

Posted by: on June 21, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

University College London (UCL) announced the launch of UCL Press on June 4, 2015. UCL Press is described as the first fully Open Access university press in the UK. The Press will focus on scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals. Inaugural titles include:  Temptation in the Archives by Lisa Jardine, Treasures from UCL by Gillian Furlong and The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections by Alice Stevenson.

UCLPress

University College London (UCL) announced the launch of UCL Press on June 4, 2015. UCL Press is described as the first fully Open Access university press in the UK. The Press will focus on scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals. Inaugural titles include:  Temptation in the Archives by Lisa Jardine, Treasures from UCL by Gillian Furlong and The Petrie […]MORE

The Cowl Digitization Project Has Entered the 1980s

Posted by: on June 9, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital Publishing Services’ ongoing digitization of back issues of the Cowl has enter a new phase, the 1980s!

Providence College’s student newspaper, The Cowl, began publication on November 16th, 1935. It has been published continuously each academic year since then, with the exception of two years in the 1940’s during World War II

We will continue to digitize the Cowl up to the point that it became a ‘born digital’ newspaper. At that point,001 we hope to collect all of the born digital copies and archive them in Digital Commons as well.

Digital Publishing Services’ ongoing digitization of back issues of the Cowl has enter a new phase, the 1980s! Providence College’s student newspaper, The Cowl, began publication on November 16th, 1935. It has been published continuously each academic year since then, with the exception of two years in the 1940’s during World War II We will […]MORE

White House Digital Initiative

Posted by: on June 1, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

A number of major U.S. publishers have agreed to work with the White House, and president Obama, on an initiative to expand access to e-books and digital content to low income students. The goal is to provide at least 250$ million in free e-books and to provide library cards for all low income students.

Several major U.S. publishers have agreed to participate, including Simon & Schuster, Bloomsbury, Macmillan, Random House-Penguin and HarperCollins. Also, nonprofits and libraries will be teaming up to produce an app that will be able deliver the digital books. The New York Public library is working with book donation nonprofit Firstbook to develop the e-reader app for these books – many of which are already in the public domain.  (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to-announce-ebook-initiative-for-low-income-students/)

Read more about the initiative here: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to-announce-ebook-initiative-for-low-income-students/

Read the White House fact sheet here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/04/30/fact-sheet-spreading-joy-reading-more-children-and-young-adults

A number of major U.S. publishers have agreed to work with the White House, and president Obama, on an initiative to expand access to e-books and digital content to low income students. The goal is to provide at least 250$ million in free e-books and to provide library cards for all low income students. Several major […]MORE

Freegal Service Allows Free Digital Access to Music

Posted by: on May 18, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Untitled-4Announced this week by the Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries is access to a service both now offer called Freegal. Freegal is a music service offered through a subscribing library’s website, which provides access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. It is provided through Library Ideas, LLC, a company based in Vienna, VA that stocks libraries with digital content (offering Freading eBook Service and Rocket Languages in addition to Freegal).

All that is required to access Freegal is a valid library card with a subscribing library. Free Freegal mobile apps for Apple and Android devices are available through the Apple app store and GooglePlay for cardholders of subscribing libraries. There are limits on number of downloads allowed weekly and on stream time daily. While MP3 downloads are restricted by amount weekly, they never expire and can be saved to mobile devices indefinitely. Freegal offers a similarly designed movie service, as well, that allows patrons of subscribing libraries access to thousands of movies and shows. For more on each library’s use of Freegal, please see these articles: Lubbock Freegal, Peoria Freegal.

Announced this week by the Lubbock and Peoria Public Libraries is access to a service both now offer called Freegal. Freegal is a music service offered through a subscribing library’s website, which provides access to over 7 million songs and more than 15,000 music videos. Over 5,000 libraries around the world subscribe to the service. […]MORE

ACRL Conference 2015: Spacing Out with the Library

Posted by: on May 7, 2015   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

ACRL_Logo1

Tomorrow (Friday, May 8th, 2015) is the annual Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) New England Chapter conference, held at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. This year’s theme is “Spacing Out with the Library: An Exploration of Collaboration Across the Physical, Virtual and those Places in Between”. At the heart of this theme will be the questions, “What does it take to expand ‘the library’ beyond its traditional physical space?” and “With whom are we working to expand our services?” Addressing these questions will be keynote speakers Marie S.A. Sorensen (Architects + Planners, Inc.) and David Weinberger (Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society) as well as numerous regional librarians and library workers.

We at Digital Publishing Services are excited about what conversations the conference might explore, as much of our work relates to creating connections between the physical and the virtual, and exploring the nature of those connections as they proliferate and evolve. Some sessions of interest to DPS, as they relate to our own digital initiatives, include: “Books in e-Space – How Far Do Students Go?”; “New Object Models and APIs: Foregrounding Re-Use in a Digital Repository”, which posed structural questions regarding institutional repositories, and how to best reflect complex objects and relationships digitally; “Federated Open Access: Balancing the Needs of the Many and the Needs of the Few”; and “Strengthening Service through Collaboration: Digital Scholarship at the University of Connecticut Libraries”.

For more information on the 2015 ACRL NEC Conference, visit http://conference2015.acrlnec.org/.

Hope to see some of our readers there!

Tomorrow (Friday, May 8th, 2015) is the annual Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) New England Chapter conference, held at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. This year’s theme is “Spacing Out with the Library: An Exploration of Collaboration Across the Physical, Virtual and those Places in Between”. At the heart of […]MORE

Historical Pamphlets Added to the Dorr Rebellion Site

Posted by: on April 28, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Digital Publishing Services recently added 16 pamphletsScreen Shot 2015-04-28 at 10.03.11 AM to the Dorr Rebellion website titled: Pamphlets: Contemporary Assessments of the Dorr Rebellion.  From the site:

Learn more about what contemporaries of the Dorr Rebellion thought about the conflict by exploring these 16 pamphlets written during or shortly after the rebellion took place.

 

One great example is “An Address on the Right of Free Suffrage'” written by Seth Luther, an antebellum workers’ and suffrage organizer from Providence, RI.  In this pamphlet, Luther speaks at length about the discrepancies surrounding the rights of free men in this still young government and it’s constitution.

This material adds an important additional layer of complexity to the Dorr site.  It allows readers to explore what those for and against the Dorr Rebellion were writing before, during and shortly after it took place.

Digital Publishing Services recently added 16 pamphlets to the Dorr Rebellion website titled: Pamphlets: Contemporary Assessments of the Dorr Rebellion.  From the site: Learn more about what contemporaries of the Dorr Rebellion thought about the conflict by exploring these 16 pamphlets written during or shortly after the rebellion took place.   One great example is […]MORE

UT Libraries release Derris collection

Posted by: on April 23, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to music composed by local folk musicians, as well as slide shows of iconic Smoky Mountain locales.

Read more about the project here  |  View the collection here!

Approximately 4,400 slides and eight reels of 8mm film shot by Derris were donated to UT Libraries. The film footage was first digitized, and then the most interesting Smokies content was excerpted to create shorter clips.

The University of Tennessee Knoxville has recently made public a digital collection of images and movie clips from William Derris. William Derris was an avid videographer and photographer who spent much of his time collecting imagery of the Great Smoky Mountains in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The collection features some short films set to […]MORE

Providence College Army Specialized Training Program Site Now Live

Posted by: on April 15, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/.

astp

PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) for leadership roles within the Army during World War II.  During the program’s short tenure over 500 soldiers from around the country lived and took classes at Providence College. The ASTP Program was important to Providence College as it kept enrollments up during the war. The program concluded nationally when soldiers were needed on the battlefields of Europe as war efforts increased.

PC’s ASTP collection includes video, photographs, correspondence, newspaper coverage, archival materials, and more.  While the site remains a work in progress in terms of organization and curation, it is complete in terms of presenting digitized content.  Please explore the collection and let us know if you have thoughts or feedback using the commenting feature on each item’s page, or be emailing us at dps@providence.edu.  We are especially interested in identifying individuals pictured in the collection photographs.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share a new, open access, collection presenting the full archive of Providence College’s Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP): http://library.providence.edu/astp/. PC’s ASTP took place from 1943-1944.  The program, which took place at over 100 institutions of higher education around the country,  aimed to educate young, academically talented, soldiers (ages 18-21) […]MORE

Spotlight: Dorr Rebellion Site Constitutions

Posted by: on April 2, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

2Featured on the Dorr Rebellion website is a Constitutions module. This section features links to PDFs of The People’s Constitution, Law & Order Constitution, and a side by side comparison of the two. The PDFs are readable online (or available for download) as searchable documents or available for examination in a page viewer that has the option of automatic or manual page turning. Each constitution’s page has on it a detailed summary of information relevant to it, written by Dr. Patrick T. Conley, constitutional historian and co-author of The Rhode Island State Constitution: A Reference Guide (2010). An article-by-article comparison is also available on the main Constitutions page. You can view this section of the site here.

Featured on the Dorr Rebellion website is a Constitutions module. This section features links to PDFs of The People’s Constitution, Law & Order Constitution, and a side by side comparison of the two. The PDFs are readable online (or available for download) as searchable documents or available for examination in a page viewer that has the […]MORE

ACRL DigiCamp 2015

Posted by: on March 27, 2015   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

digicamp

On Friday, March 13th, ACRL’s Information Technology Interest Group hosted its annual DigiCamp unconference at Simmons College. For those new to the concept, an unconference is an event similar in structure to a conference (i.e. track-based schedule), but it differs in that each session is intended to be an open dialog about a given subject amongst its participants. Aside from a facilitator or two providing guidance to the discussion, it can flow in any number of relevant directions. ITIG first organized DigiCamp back in 2010 as a means to gather people in academic libraries to discuss how they were using technology and what technology might be of interest in the future. Following that path, the 2015 DigiCamp had twelve tracks, each dedicated to a specific aspect of using technology in libraries.

Each session was approximately an hour long and participants were free to move between the different tracks if the subject wasn’t of interest to them. The first block offered conversations on open access and institutional repositories, marketing in libraries, discovery services, and assessment. The second offered sessions on LibGuides, mobile technologies, altmetrics, and open education resources. And finally, the third closed out the day with discussions on eBooks, digital preservation, makerspaces, and responsive web design.

There are often many takeaways from DigiCamp, as you get to here the details of how people are approaching these issues. All facilitators were requested to take notes on the session and then capture images of them for later reference. The session I co-facilitated on makerspaces generated over 9 pages of notes, which indicates that it was a pretty lively discussion.

To find out more about DigiCamp 2015, and to access the session notes, please check out the Google site located below. And hope to see you at DigiCamp next year!

https://sites.google.com/site/digicamp2015/home

On Friday, March 13th, ACRL’s Information Technology Interest Group hosted its annual DigiCamp unconference at Simmons College. For those new to the concept, an unconference is an event similar in structure to a conference (i.e. track-based schedule), but it differs in that each session is intended to be an open dialog about a given subject […]MORE

The Peeps are Back!!

Posted by: on March 19, 2015   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Spring is almost upon us, which can mean only one thing, the Peeps are back at Phillips Memorial Library!  They have been causing quite a stir, getting into lots of trouble! Geese and peepsTake a gander at what they have been up to on the PeepsinTheLibrary Twitter page!

Spring is almost upon us, which can mean only one thing, the Peeps are back at Phillips Memorial Library!  They have been causing quite a stir, getting into lots of trouble! Take a gander at what they have been up to on the PeepsinTheLibrary Twitter page!MORE

Faculty Authors Series: Jessica Mulligan

Posted by: on March 12, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

A brand new interview is now available for your consumption at our Faculty Authors Series site. Jessica Mulligan, an assistant professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College is currently featured. Her book, Unmanageable Care, explores the privatized health care system in Puerto Rico through a number of interviews and participant observations.

Check out Jessica Mulligans page

A brand new interview is now available for your consumption at our Faculty Authors Series site. Jessica Mulligan, an assistant professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College is currently featured. Her book, Unmanageable Care, explores the privatized health care system in Puerto Rico through a number of interviews and participant observations. Check out […]MORE

New Journal: Sociology Between the Gaps

Posted by: on March 5, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share that our newest journal collaboration has launched.  Sociology Between the Gaps is a new, innovative, peer-reviewed, open-access, cross-disciplinary, independent online journal being published using the Digital Commons platform.  The journal also aims to reflect the intersections of social class, race, gender, age, and cross-disciplinary views by encouraging sociologists and professionals in related fields to submit work on topics that cross disciplinary boundaries and/or areas of specialization but effectively link disciplines to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective on the topics addressed.  The first issue, Adoption and Families: National and International Perspectives, is currently open for submissions.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to share that our newest journal collaboration has launched.  Sociology Between the Gaps is a new, innovative, peer-reviewed, open-access, cross-disciplinary, independent online journal being published using the Digital Commons platform.  The journal also aims to reflect the intersections of social class, race, gender, age, and cross-disciplinary views by encouraging sociologists […]MORE

Providence College’s Digital Commons Celebrates 1 Million Downloads

Posted by: on February 26, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Recently, Providence College’s Digital Commons, an online platform for publishing College scholarship and creative work, reached a milestone. Since its launch in 2007, Digital Commons content has been collectively downloaded more than one million times. To celebrate and highlight meaningful faculty, student and library collaborations, the Digital Publishing Services (DPS) team has created the following video.

 

Recently, Providence College’s Digital Commons, an online platform for publishing College scholarship and creative work, reached a milestone. Since its launch in 2007, Digital Commons content has been collectively downloaded more than one million times. To celebrate and highlight meaningful faculty, student and library collaborations, the Digital Publishing Services (DPS) team has created the following video. […]MORE

Historic Catholic & Dominican Documents in Digital Commons

Posted by: on February 20, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

thumbnailRecently added to Providence College’s Digital Commons, courtesy of Phillips Memorial Library’s Special Collections, is a specialty section of historic Catholic and Dominican documents, including selections by Pope Benedict XV, Reverend John Proctor, and the Catholic Church. Visit the site to take a look!

Recently added to Providence College’s Digital Commons, courtesy of Phillips Memorial Library’s Special Collections, is a specialty section of historic Catholic and Dominican documents, including selections by Pope Benedict XV, Reverend John Proctor, and the Catholic Church. Visit the site to take a look!MORE

Querying the Library Conference Proceedings

Posted by: on February 13, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

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As readers of the Digital Publishing Services blog might recall, several of the DPS staff were involved in the Querying the Library: Digitization and Its Impact conference at Rhode Island College two years ago. Their presentation, entitled “Publishing INTI: A Suite of Services Case Study,” detailed the department’s multifaceted digitization and publication support for INTI, a Spanish-language literature journal edited by Providence College faculty member Roger Carmosino.

Following the event, the Adams Library at Rhode Island College requested proceedings from the presenters to document the conference. Most recently, ePub and iBook versions of the proceedings have been developed and published. For those unfamiliar with these formats, ePub and iBook are electronic publication formats that are optimized for mobile use. One benefit of working with these formats is that they can be media-enhanced. As a demonstration of this functionality, video recordings of the presentation have been made available either directly within the proceedings or through them via hyperlink.

We in Digital Publishing Services are grateful for the support Rhode Island College has offered to document this event and excited to see the developing usage of electronic publications within our library consortium.

The Querying the Library: Digitization and Its Impact conference proceedings are freely available for download via Rhode Island College’s Digital Commons at the following URL:

http://digitalcommons.ric.edu/ebook_gallery/29/

As readers of the Digital Publishing Services blog might recall, several of the DPS staff were involved in the Querying the Library: Digitization and Its Impact conference at Rhode Island College two years ago. Their presentation, entitled “Publishing INTI: A Suite of Services Case Study,” detailed the department’s multifaceted digitization and publication support for INTI, […]MORE

Coming soon! Digital Commons Promotional Video!

Posted by: on February 5, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Screen Shot 2015-02-04 at 8.58.39 AMThe DPS has been tirelessly working on a promotional video for the Digital Commons.  The catalyst for this video was Providence College reaching a milestone of 1 million full-text downloads from the Digital Commons site! The video is forthcoming. Stay tuned!!

The DPS has been tirelessly working on a promotional video for the Digital Commons.  The catalyst for this video was Providence College reaching a milestone of 1 million full-text downloads from the Digital Commons site! The video is forthcoming. Stay tuned!!MORE

Sneak Peak: Army Specialized Training Program Site

Posted by: on January 29, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

astp-homepage

We’ve been working on a new site designed to allow for the exploration of media related to the Providence College ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program). Users will have access to historical photos, articles, and correspondence relating to PC’s ASTP, dating back to World War II. The collection can be experienced through pre-made exhibits (sorted by media type), or by searching across the entire collection. The site is being built on top of a customized instance of Omeka, and should be live on the library.providence.edu web space “soon”.

Stay tuned for more updates and an announcement when we go live with the site!

 

We’ve been working on a new site designed to allow for the exploration of media related to the Providence College ASTP (Army Specialized Training Program). Users will have access to historical photos, articles, and correspondence relating to PC’s ASTP, dating back to World War II. The collection can be experienced through pre-made exhibits (sorted by […]MORE

New Digitization Project: John Farrell Sports Scrapbooks

Posted by: on January 14, 2015   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

11Digital Publishing Services has recently taken on a new and exciting digitization project: John Farrell, a Providence College alum and former athlete of the college, created and kept 40 years of newspaper articles related PC sports (spanning from the 1920s to the 1960s), which he kept in scrapbook form in bound volumes. Over the next few months, our department, with the help of the department of Special and Archival Collections (who house the volumes), will be photographing and digitizing all of the volumes and displaying them online. Check our Digital Commons site to see the progress as it is being made.

Digital Publishing Services has recently taken on a new and exciting digitization project: John Farrell, a Providence College alum and former athlete of the college, created and kept 40 years of newspaper articles related PC sports (spanning from the 1920s to the 1960s), which he kept in scrapbook form in bound volumes. Over the next […]MORE

PC’s Digital Commons Reaches 1 Million Downloads!

Posted by: on January 8, 2015   |Comments (0)|Open Access
photo by flickr user ludovik

photo by flickr user ludovik available here

It’s official, Providence College’s Digital Commons has reached 1 Million Downloads!

Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository, a place for faculty and students to publish their scholarly and creative work on the web. Managed by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons, the repository was launched in 2007. Digital Commons now hosts over 4,000 items, which have been downloaded over one million times!

To learn more about Digital Commons at PC, check out this post.  Now, for the party hats and confetti!

 

 

 

It’s official, Providence College’s Digital Commons has reached 1 Million Downloads! Digital Commons is Providence College’s institutional repository, a place for faculty and students to publish their scholarly and creative work on the web. Managed by the Phillips Memorial Library + Commons, the repository was launched in 2007. Digital Commons now hosts over 4,000 items, […]MORE

Digitally Animated Ugly Christmas Sweater

Posted by: on December 18, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party.

Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.

 

Take your ugly Christmas sweater game to the next level. Blow the minds of all your friends at your next holiday party. Made possible by MorphCostumes. This is the next step towards digital apparel. Read more about it at GeekWire.  MORE

Need a diversion during finals? Try the Inspirograph

Posted by: on December 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Feeling a little overwhelmed this week?  We hear you!  Here’s a suggestion for a little diversion: the Inspirograph, a digital version of the classic, analog, Spirograph toy.

inspiro 2

To use the Inspirograph, simply select either a fixed or rotating gauge in any of the sizes available and start making your spirals.  You can select different pen and background colors using the preset selections or choosing your own.  Here’s a look at my creation:

inspiro

Once you’ve completed a design, you can download it or submit it to a gallery full of designs by other users.  Trust me, this is addictive.

I discovered the Inspirograph via the Co.Design blog. Try it our yourself!

 

Feeling a little overwhelmed this week?  We hear you!  Here’s a suggestion for a little diversion: the Inspirograph, a digital version of the classic, analog, Spirograph toy. To use the Inspirograph, simply select either a fixed or rotating gauge in any of the sizes available and start making your spirals.  You can select different pen […]MORE

The Assisi Institute Journal

Posted by: on November 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

45398528c7d715dd1ce4728e426441efNew to Providence College’s Digital Commons this Fall is the Assisi Institute Journal.

“The Assisi Institute Journal provides a forum for interdisciplinary investigation into the presence and working of psyche in matter, and the influence of archetypal patterns and dynamics in the personal and collective domains of culture and life. Accordingly, the Journal seeks to advance analysis of the ‘psychic fields of experience’ present in clinical and therapeutic settings, organizations (government, business, leadership, scientific, and cultural), artistic, spiritual, and religious practices, and the natural and/or built environment. Of particular importance is the contribution toward a more profound understanding of archetypal patterns as they influence both the proliferation of violence in the world and the establishment of justice and peace in human relations in both local and international communities.” (source)

Please click here to view this new and exciting peer-reviewed journal!

New to Providence College’s Digital Commons this Fall is the Assisi Institute Journal. “The Assisi Institute Journal provides a forum for interdisciplinary investigation into the presence and working of psyche in matter, and the influence of archetypal patterns and dynamics in the personal and collective domains of culture and life. Accordingly, the Journal seeks to […]MORE

4DSound & the Future of Library Media Spaces

Posted by: on November 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

4dsys_full_front

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than just stereo; its sixteen vertical speaker columns and complex control system can reproduce sounds in a way unlike anything heard before. Listeners can move through the space, experiencing sounds move around them over time – even sometimes giving the illusion that one is passing between the present and the past.

What does this futuristic system have to do with libraries? Well, if the technology behind it becomes more accessible, we could see a huge shift in experiencing media, especially within libraries of the future. If libraries continue aligning themselves with user media expectations, and even become instructional centers for new media, they may soon host experimental spaces similar to 4DSound – spaces for their community to realize applications yet to be conceived. What’s more, imagine how this might impact music librarianship: the release of new 4d-enchanced audio providing patrons a greater sense of how spatial sound is.

Now, of course, not all advances in media forever change the landscape (quadrophonic sound anyone?), but more generally we in libraries should keep our ear to the ground (excuse the bad wordplay…) to know what may becoming, and what we might be able to bring to our patrons if they haven’t brought it to us first.

While you’re waiting for the future to arrive, please enjoy this video of a recent hack session at 4DSound as inspiration: http://vimeo.com/111579911.

 

As libraries become more media inclusive, one might wonder how library services and resources could benefit from, or potentially contribute to, future media applications. One of the most impressive new media developments in the world is the 4DSound system in Amsterdam. 4DSound is an immersive space that allows sound to be actualized in more than […]MORE

At the Museum: Library of Congress Blog

Posted by: on November 13, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The Library of Congress, Digital Preservation website has a blog called At the Museum, which highlights various museum’s digital collections and the people who work with these collections.  The most recent blog has an interview with Ellice Engdahl, Digital Collections & Content Manager, and Brian Wilson, Digital Access and Preservation Archivist of the Henry Ford Museum.  Previous posts include an interview with Marla Misunas, Collections Information Manager for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Please check it out! Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.17.02 AMScreen Shot 2014-11-12 at 10.16.54 AM

 

The Library of Congress, Digital Preservation website has a blog called At the Museum, which highlights various museum’s digital collections and the people who work with these collections.  The most recent blog has an interview with Ellice Engdahl, Digital Collections & Content Manager, and Brian Wilson, Digital Access and Preservation Archivist of the Henry Ford Museum.  Previous posts include […]MORE

Data Viz Exploration: the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards

Posted by: on October 31, 2014   |Comment (1)|Spotlights

Here in DPS we are just starting to get our feet wet in the world of data visualization.  Is this a new topic for you too?  Well, to help you gain an understanding of the power of data visualization, we suggest checking out the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards.  Voting is taking place now for the 2014 Awards, but you can view the list of finalists here.

Here are a couple of my personal favorites from the short list:

 Data Visualizationaftermarket eduction copy:

Aftermarket Education by Beutler Ink

For its annual Education Issue, Popular Science magazine explored the huge uptick in massive open online courses (MOOCs) and tapped us for our data visualization expertise to bring the numbers to life. Using a series of clusters to represent available MOOCs, we showed the number of courses available through 2014 at nine of the largest MOOC providers. Through light-hearted callouts, we suggest possible courses of study a casual student might pursue. The infographic appeared in the September 2013 issue of the print edition.

Infographicceative routines copy:

Creative Routines by RJ Andrews

How do creatives – composers, painters, writers, scientists, philosophers – find the time to produce their opus? Mason Currey investigated the rigid Daily Rituals that hundreds of creatives practiced in order to carve out time, every day, to work their craft. Some kept to the same disciplined regimen for decades while others locked in patterns only while working on specific works. “Creative Routines” visualizes a selection of the routines Currey researched.

 

 

 

Interactivewomen in science copy:

Women in Science by FF Function

An interactive tool built for the Unesco Institute for Statistics as part of the International Women’s Day and centered on the theme “Equality for women is progress for all” helps visualize the gender gaps in the pipeline leading to a career in research.

There is much more to explore at the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards site.  Enjoy!

Here in DPS we are just starting to get our feet wet in the world of data visualization.  Is this a new topic for you too?  Well, to help you gain an understanding of the power of data visualization, we suggest checking out the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards.  Voting is taking place now for […]MORE

Five Key Moments in the Open Access Movement in the Last Ten Years

Posted by: on October 22, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Oxford University Press Logo

This week, the library and information community along with others in academia are celebrating International Open Access Week. In a post on the Oxford University Press (OUP) blog, OUP publisher Rhodri Jackson lists five key open access to research events since OUP’s beginning participation in the Open Access (OA) Movement: 1) Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) converts to OA in 2004/05; 2) the National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandate OA in 2008 to NIH-funded research; 3) Springer buys BioMed Central (BMC) in 2008; 4) Public Library of Science (PLOS) ONE‘s growth in 2007; and 5) The ‘Finch’ Report in 2012, positively impacting OA.

For details on each of the five listed events, see Jackson’s full post here.

This week, the library and information community along with others in academia are celebrating International Open Access Week. In a post on the Oxford University Press (OUP) blog, OUP publisher Rhodri Jackson lists five key open access to research events since OUP’s beginning participation in the Open Access (OA) Movement: 1) Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) […]MORE

Open Access Week Events at Providence College

Posted by: on October 16, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

pc_oaw_logo_web

In celebration of Open Access Week, a SPARC-organized international series of events recognizing open access initiatives and issues, Digital Publishing Services will be offering several open access-related events to the Providence College community. Open access is an umbrella term referring to any online resources, scholarship, or projects that are shared publicly without requiring a paid subscription or institutional affiliation. The importance of open access initiatives is that they are developed and operated in the interest of free knowledge. Here are the Open Access Week 2014 events that will be held in the Phillips Memorial Library:

World Bank and SPARC Announce Open Access Week
Monday, October 20; 3:00 pm – ­ 4:00 pm
Library eClassroom

SPARC and the World Bank will co-host the official kickoff event for International Open Access Week 2014. The program will focus on this year’s theme of “Generation Open.” Speakers will discuss the importance of students and early career researchers in the transition to Open Access and explore how changes in scholarly publishing affect scholars and researchers at different stages of their careers.

Open Access Drop-In
Wednesday, October 22; 11:00 am ­- 1:00 pm
Library Entryway

Drop in anytime between 11am-1pm to to learn more about:

  • Digital Commons
  • SelectedWorks
  • Open Access (OA)
  • How you can get involved

Light (open access-themed!) refreshments will be served!

ACRL Presents – Celebrating Open Access Week: Scholarly Communication Initiatives at Academic Libraries
Thursday, October 23; 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Location TBD

There are many ways that academic librarians are engaging with their communities around issues of open access and scholarly communication – collaborations with faculty, students and administration are key to understanding user perspectives and to building advocacy.  This webcast will present examples of scholarly communication and open access initiatives at a variety of academic libraries across the country.  Join us to learn how your colleagues are engaging with their communities around issues of author rights, open access, open educational resources, and more.

Film Screening and Discussion: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
Friday, October 24; 2:30 pm –  4:00 pm
Library eClassroom

Join us for a screening and discussion of The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz.. The film follows the story of programming prodigy and information activist Aaron Swartz. From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a two-year legal nightmare. It was a battle that ended with the taking of his own life at the age of 26. Aaron’s story touched a nerve with people far beyond the online communities in which he was a celebrity. This film is a personal story about what we lose when we are tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties.

To view the full schedule, visit http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/oaw/2014/.

Hope to see you in the Library for these interesting events!

 

 

In celebration of Open Access Week, a SPARC-organized international series of events recognizing open access initiatives and issues, Digital Publishing Services will be offering several open access-related events to the Providence College community. Open access is an umbrella term referring to any online resources, scholarship, or projects that are shared publicly without requiring a paid […]MORE

Inti Celebrates 40 Years

Posted by: on October 16, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

17This Fall, the Inti journal celebrates 40 years of publication. Inti was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time, for 40 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish literature, creative writing by Latin and Spanish authors, and works of art by visual artists. Phillips Memorial Library will host an exhibit highlighting Inti’s tenure during the month of October – stop by to view and check out the virtual exhibit here!

This Fall, the Inti journal celebrates 40 years of publication. Inti was founded by Roger Carmosino, Professor of Foreign Language Studies at Providence College, in November of 1974 at the University of Connecticut-Storrs. Since that time, for 40 years, Inti has been in publication without interruption. Inti features research and scholarship on Latin and Spanish […]MORE

Free Audio Resources without Copyright Restrictions

Posted by: on September 30, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions that a student’s video project would be more effective with the use of music.  Teachers might find these sites useful to explain copyright issues to students in regards to stealing music, etc. from the web, by showing them what music is actually in the public domain and has a Creative Commons License. Of course, these sites might also Screen Shot 2014-09-30 at 11.29.51 AMbenefit teachers for their own projects, as well.

A few great sites for finding free music include:

  • Free Music Archive: This is a great site that hosts a wide range of music genres in a high quality format, free of charge.
  • Sound Bible: This site is an excellent source for various sound effects, such as: dog barks, city sounds, wind sounds, etc.
  • SoundGator: This is also a great site for various sound effects, sound bites and sound clips that are in the public domain with a Creative Commons License.

 

Did you know that there are many ways to find free music and sounds effects licensed for re-use online?  This recent blog post from Free Technology for Teachers shares some such sites.  These tools are helpful in many ways, including using sound files for various multimedia projects, such as videos that include music.  The article specifically mentions […]MORE

TAPAS public launch

Posted by: on September 26, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

 

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An exciting project from Northeastern, TAPAS (TEI Archiving Publishing and Access Service), is set to launch publicly October 1st! TAPAS is an open source, low cost, and collaborative repository service for TEI data. Users will have the capability to transform their TEI in a number ways, as well as share their data openly across the service. Digital Publishing Services here at PC was an early adopter, and even participated in beta testing for the system. We are currently working on sharing our Dorr Letters Collection on TAPAS. Stay tuned!

Learn more about the project (and get involved!) here: http://www.tapasproject.org/

    An exciting project from Northeastern, TAPAS (TEI Archiving Publishing and Access Service), is set to launch publicly October 1st! TAPAS is an open source, low cost, and collaborative repository service for TEI data. Users will have the capability to transform their TEI in a number ways, as well as share their data openly across the service. Digital […]MORE

LC Shares Free, Interactive eBooks

Posted by: on September 17, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources
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table of contents for the Harlem Renaissance book

The Library of Congress recently made available six interactive ebooks for use by educators, students, and the public.  The books, referred to as the Student Discovery Set, cover a range of topics including: the Constitution, the Dust Bowl,the Harlem Renaissance, Immigration, Symbols of the United States, and Understanding the Cosmos.  The books are available for the iPad and can be downloaded for free on iBooks.

Each book includes 15-20 primary sources.  Interactive tools let students zoom in for close examination, draw to highlight interesting details and make notes about what they discover.  The end of each book provides a detailed list of citation information for each source, as well as link to it within the Library of Congress collections.

This set is of interest to us in DPS for a couple of reasons.  It serves as an interesting model of publishing content using the iBook format, something we are also currently investigating.  It also demonstrates the power of curating digital collections as open educational resources for use in classrooms.

Visit the LC site to download the books! http://www.loc.gov/teachers/student-discovery-sets/

The Library of Congress recently made available six interactive ebooks for use by educators, students, and the public.  The books, referred to as the Student Discovery Set, cover a range of topics including: the Constitution, the Dust Bowl,the Harlem Renaissance, Immigration, Symbols of the United States, and Understanding the Cosmos.  The books are available for […]MORE

Shepard Fairey: A Case of Fair Use

Posted by: on September 8, 2014   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

In mid-August, my colleagues and I completed a MOOC on Copyright for Librarians & Educators.  The course was presented by Duke University. A topic widely discussed and debated in both the lectures and forums was the issue of fair use. Fair use (in US copyright law) is, “the doctrine that brief excerpts of copyright material may, under certain circumstances, be quoted verbatim for purposes such as criticism, news reporting, teaching, and research, without the need for permission from or payment to the copyright holder.” (source)

One of the most intriguing cases of fair use for me is the one of street artist, Shepard Fairey, who battled in court from 2009 to 2012 with the Associated Press and photographer Mannie Garcia, over his transformation of the photograph that was used to create the Obama Hope print. Ultimately, he won on the issue of fair use, but lost on the issue of perjury (he initially lied about which photo he had used as inspiration for his work). Many know Fairey as the artist behind the OBEY GIANT imagery.

Fairey’s thoughts on the issue were eloquently detailed in the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology’sReflections on the Hope Poster Case“. In it, he states that his argument for his work falling under fair use is that he used pieces of the photo as raw material to create a heroic and inspirational political portrait, the aesthetic of which was fundamentally different from the original photo. Of his use of appropriation, he said, “The cultures that inspire me creatively — punk rock, skateboarding, and streetwear (graphics-heavy casual fashion) — all rely heavily on appropriation art, both because they are irreverent cultures, questioning the status quo, and because they are cultures with a rapid metabolism and throw-away mentality.”

As to why he did not obtain a license, Fairey said: “I intended no disrespect to photographer Mannie Garcia, but I did not think I needed permission to make an art piece using a reference photo. From the beginning, I openly acknowledged that my illustration of Obama was based on a reference photograph.  But the photograph is just a starting point. The illustration transforms it aesthetically in its stylization and idealization, and the poster has an altogether different purpose than the photograph does.” (source) So what do you think? Does Fairey’s work fall under fair use, or does he owe royalty money to the Associated Press and Mannie Garcia?  For more of Fairey’s thoughts on appropriation, take a look at the Reflections article here.

In mid-August, my colleagues and I completed a MOOC on Copyright for Librarians & Educators.  The course was presented by Duke University. A topic widely discussed and debated in both the lectures and forums was the issue of fair use. Fair use (in US copyright law) is, “the doctrine that brief excerpts of copyright material […]MORE

Welcome Back, From DPS!

Posted by: on August 29, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

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Image courtesy of Tulane University’s Public Relations Department. Creative Commons License Attribution 2.0 Generic.

Students and faculty are starting to arrive at campus for the upcoming academic year and we at DPS thought it would be nice to provide a re-introduction of what we do and a summary of what we’ve been up to the past few months.

Digital Publishing Services offers services and consultations for members of the Providence College community in a wide range of subjects: digitization; publishing and copyright; multimedia; and emerging library/publishing technologies. Come by our DPS Lab located in L111 of the Phillips Memorial Library and we would be happy to discuss our services and facilities with you further!

Over the summer, we’ve been involved in several projects. Earlier in June, we released 30 more text-encoded letters for the Dorr Letters Project. This new collection focuses on correspondence to and from John Brown Francis, the former governor and state senator of Rhode Island during Dorr’s time. We’ve also added more entries in the “ography” pop-ups – so now summaries appear for more important people, places and organizations when you hover your mouse over them!

We’ve also been involved in planning a statewide digital repository initiative. One potential facet of this has been digitizing our Special Collections’ material on the Army Service Training Program (ASTP) which was held at Providence College in World War II. In addition to scanning, OCR-ing, and transcribing the material, we’ve also begun research on Omeka as a platform for publishing exhibits on the ASTP collection. Stay tuned for more updates throughout the year!

And as a final reminder, we now loan multimedia equipment (camcorders, portable audio recorders, and more) through the MediaHub! So, if you have a project you’d like to enhance with media, feel free to stop by DPS to inquire about our equipment or visit http://www.providence.edu/library/Pages/media-hub.aspx.

From DPS – we hope you all have a wonderful academic year!

 

Image courtesy of Tulane University’s Public Relations Department. Creative Commons License Attribution 2.0 Generic. Students and faculty are starting to arrive at campus for the upcoming academic year and we at DPS thought it would be nice to provide a re-introduction of what we do and a summary of what we’ve been up to the […]MORE

New Media Hub Tutorials!

Posted by: on August 20, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard this summer creating new Media Hub video tutorials.  These tutorials emphasize equipment that is available for use in the library, or can be loaned out via the circulation desk.  Three tutorials have been added in the last 2 weeks. They include tips on using GarageBand, Audacity and options for backing up Video Media. Check them out!Screen Shot 2014-08-20 at 9.07.36 AM

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard this summer creating new Media Hub video tutorials.  These tutorials emphasize equipment that is available for use in the library, or can be loaned out via the circulation desk.  Three tutorials have been added in the last 2 weeks. They include tips on using GarageBand, Audacity and options for […]MORE

Dorr Rebellion Lesson Plans

Posted by: on August 6, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Did you know that in addition to the documentary, the gallery, and the letters, the Dorr Rebellion Project web site also contains five lesson plans for use in the high school or post-secondary classroom?

The plans can be used independently or combined to form a unit on the Dorr Rebellion.  The lessons cover the following topics:

dorr lesson plans

Each lesson plan is aligned with specific Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (GSEs) for Civics and Social Studies.  All of the lessons require that students to engage with primary source material hosted on the Dorr Rebellion web site.

In May the lesson plans were shared with local K-12 teachers at the RI Social Studies Institute.  Both the lesson plans and the web site generated a lot of enthusiasm from middle and high school teachers.

If you use the lesson plans and have feedback we’d love to hear from you.  You can comment here or email dps@providence.edu.  Happy teaching!

Did you know that in addition to the documentary, the gallery, and the letters, the Dorr Rebellion Project web site also contains five lesson plans for use in the high school or post-secondary classroom? The plans can be used independently or combined to form a unit on the Dorr Rebellion.  The lessons cover the following […]MORE

Digital Commons at Providence College Nearing One Million Downloads

Posted by: on July 31, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College is part of a consortium of higher education and special libraries (i.e., Higher Education Library and Information Network / HELIN Consortium). In 2005, the HELIN Central Office, supported by the HELIN Board of Library Directors, was awarded a grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to support implementation of a consortium-wide institutional repository (IR). Grant funds provided that a distinct repository would be created for each HELIN institutional library. Each library’s IR would implement unique institutional domain names and branding.

Digital Commons at Providence College was officially launched on February 14th, 2007. Initially, the repository contained a small set of pre-prints, journals and special collection imaged artifacts. Through ongoing fruitful cross-departmental collaborations, the College can now boast four thousand digital objects in Digital Commons at Providence College representing a wide range of document types–College scholarly output and archival materials.

Digital Commons at Providence College is nearing the one million download mark; that is, collectively the four thousand resources now available will reach one million downloads. The Phillips Memorial Library Digital Publishing Services team will announce when Digital Commons at Providence College reaches one million downloads. Cause for celebration, methinks!

DCHome

The Phillips Memorial Library at Providence College is part of a consortium of higher education and special libraries (i.e., Higher Education Library and Information Network / HELIN Consortium). In 2005, the HELIN Central Office, supported by the HELIN Board of Library Directors, was awarded a grant by the Davis Educational Foundation to support implementation of […]MORE

Copyright for Educators & Librarians

Posted by: on July 24, 2014   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

2Beginning this week, three colleagues and myself will be participating in an online workshop run through Duke University by Kevin Smith (M.L.S., J.D.), Lisa A. Macklin (J.D., M.L.S.), and Anne Gilliland (J.D., M.L.S.).

All three instructors began as librarians and went to law school in order to assist colleagues in schools, colleges, and libraries better understand copyright. Their principal role in their current positions is to help sort out copyright issues that arise in education and libraries. From their introductory bio on the class website:

“In all of these situations, our goal is to help teachers and librarians accomplish their legitimate educational goals in ways that respect copyright and reduce the fear and uncertainty that sometimes hampers creative teaching. As lawyers, we strive to find responsible ways to say ‘yes’ when asked if a new teaching idea or library services can be considered within the confines of the copyright law.”

Throughout the next four weeks, we will be learning about how the history, purpose, and structure of the United States copyright law is relevant to educators and librarians. For more more information about this course, please visit the course website.

Beginning this week, three colleagues and myself will be participating in an online workshop run through Duke University by Kevin Smith (M.L.S., J.D.), Lisa A. Macklin (J.D., M.L.S.), and Anne Gilliland (J.D., M.L.S.). All three instructors began as librarians and went to law school in order to assist colleagues in schools, colleges, and libraries better […]MORE

Club Phil Megamix Video

Posted by: on July 23, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

During this spring and summer break, members of DPS have been experimenting with the MediaHub loanable equipment to get a fuller sense of what possibilities it offers to our patrons. We’re happy to say that they are pretty endless. To demonstrate this and promote the MediaHub, we’ve created a short music video & song featuring the library’s ambient sounds, some of which you might recognize if you’ve spent time in “Club Phil,” as the students call it. So, here for you’re viewing pleasure is “Club Phil Megamix” – a video created exclusively using MediaHub equipment, software and some staff know-how.

The video was recorded using two Panasonic 32GB HC-X900M HD camcorders and two Davis & Sanford Provista 7518FM tripods. All sampled sounds were recorded with a Tascam DR-40 digital handheld recorder and edited in Audacity. The song itself was arranged within GarageBand, using an Akai MPK Mini MIDI controller to program in the melodic elements and additional beats. Finally, the video was edited within Final Cut Pro X. All software and equipment listed is available through the MediaHub. If you are interested to learn more about the MediaHub and the resources we offer through it, please feel free to contact us at dps@providence.edu. We’d be happy to hear from you!

In the meantime, sit back (or dance if you wanna) and enjoy the video!

 

During this spring and summer break, members of DPS have been experimenting with the MediaHub loanable equipment to get a fuller sense of what possibilities it offers to our patrons. We’re happy to say that they are pretty endless. To demonstrate this and promote the MediaHub, we’ve created a short music video & song featuring […]MORE

New GA in Special Collections/DPS Lab!

Posted by: on July 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

The DPS Lab and Special Collections would like to take this moment to welcome our new GA (Graduate Assistant), Andrew Lavoie, to the library!lavoiephoto[1]

Andrew graduated in May 2014 from PC with a B.A. in History and a minor in Classics.  He is from Manchester, NH and is attending PC’s Graduate Program to get a Masters in American History with a focus on Early Colonial America.  As a PC undergrad, Andrew traveled to Greece with Dr. Thomas Strasser as a member of his archaeological dig team.  He will be a G.A. in Special Collections and DPS Lab for the next 2 years as he works towards his Masters.  After he graduates, he plans on either continuing his education or teaching at the high school level.

The DPS Lab and Special Collections are excited to have him as part of our team!

The DPS Lab and Special Collections would like to take this moment to welcome our new GA (Graduate Assistant), Andrew Lavoie, to the library! Andrew graduated in May 2014 from PC with a B.A. in History and a minor in Classics.  He is from Manchester, NH and is attending PC’s Graduate Program to get a […]MORE

30 more letters! Working facets! It’s another Dorr Letters site update!

Posted by: on June 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

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Hello everyone!

I’ve got some great news for those who have been following the Dorr Letters site project. We’ve just finalized the encoding for 30 more letters, uploaded them to the Dorr Letters site, and updated some of the code to allow for faceting not only by date, but now by collection and author!

We’ve added more entries for the contextual “ography” popup content, and squashed a bunch of bugs and glitches!

Check out the new updates here: http://library.providence.edu:8080/xtf/index.xml

Per usual, we are not done with the site. Stay tuned for an updated home page that will be more user friendly and will make more sense of the different Dorr Letter collections!

    Hello everyone! I’ve got some great news for those who have been following the Dorr Letters site project. We’ve just finalized the encoding for 30 more letters, uploaded them to the Dorr Letters site, and updated some of the code to allow for faceting not only by date, but now by collection and […]MORE

Ithaka S+R’s “Sustaining the Digital Humanities”

Posted by: on June 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

IthakaSR

On June 18, 2014, Ithaka’s strategic consulting and research service, Ithaka S+R, published “Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase,” which assesses the role that higher education institutions are playing as faculty and staff continue to create digital resources. With an eye toward value and sustainability, the report casts a wide net, looking beyond just institutionally supported online journals, author-archived post-prints and institutional repositories, to digital collections, portals, encyclopedias, mapping tools, crowdsourced transcription projects, visualization tools, and more.

Read about the report here.
Download the full report here.

On June 18, 2014, Ithaka’s strategic consulting and research service, Ithaka S+R, published “Sustaining the Digital Humanities: Host Institution Support beyond the Start-Up Phase,” which assesses the role that higher education institutions are playing as faculty and staff continue to create digital resources. With an eye toward value and sustainability, the report casts a wide […]MORE

Skullphone: Digital Media

Posted by: on June 12, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

SkullphoneTTDBILSkullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas stations. The intent of his early work was to blend in to existing outdoor advertising, signage, and architecture.

In 2010, he debuted a series called Digital Media, an exhibit intended for indoor viewing, a departure from his outdoor work, at a space called Subliminal Projects. The exhibit explored advertising, government, and private enterprise signage, and the spaces on which outdoor media is displayed – making permanent on panels what is reprogrammable and removable in outdoor space. The paintings were done on polished black-painted aluminum panels, used a grid system of red, blue, and green paint (to mimic LED displays) – and were pointillistic, dislocating when approached. They examined the contradictions inherent in outdoor digital signage. (References: Obey, SH, Skullphone, Wikipedia)

SkullphoneHalfMassImages: Theres 30 Digital Billboards in Los Angeles (top) and Half Mass (bottom) from Digital Media ’10.

Skullphone is an American street artist, who gained notoriety due to the “Skullphone” image (a black and white skull on a cell phone) that he started posting around Los Angeles in 1999. He received additional recognition for his serial image of a skeletal version of the Mobil station pegasus, which he attached to condemned gas […]MORE

NERCOMP “Doing Digital Humanities on a Shoestring Budget”

Posted by: on June 9, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

NERCOMP-logo

Yesterday, several members of Digital Publishing Services attended a NERCOMP (NorthEast Regional Computing Program) event on inexpensively creating and managing digital humanities projects. The event featured several speakers from a range of Northeastern higher ed institutions to discuss their projects and the motives, tools, and strategies behind them. Of the subjects covered, some highlights were: introducing gaming elements into a Classics course via collaborative online annotation; digital storytelling with iPads; virtual history narratives; publishing and analysis tools; and data preservation methods. The variety of the projects and methods served as a strong indication that digital humanities can be a feasible pursuit for many institutions, even those with a limited budget.

Information and downloadable materials are available at the NERCOMP event site. For an archive of live commentary on the event, you can search #NERCOMP on Twitter.

Yesterday, several members of Digital Publishing Services attended a NERCOMP (NorthEast Regional Computing Program) event on inexpensively creating and managing digital humanities projects. The event featured several speakers from a range of Northeastern higher ed institutions to discuss their projects and the motives, tools, and strategies behind them. Of the subjects covered, some highlights were: […]MORE

Library Exhibits

Posted by: on May 27, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Digital Publishing Services has been working with the Special Collections on creating online galleries of present and past library exhibits.  There are presently fourlibexhibit_mockup2a gallery exhibits posted to the Digital Commons, our institutional repository.

The exhibits include two from our wooden case: presently, Nineteenth-Century British and American Book Covers, and previously, Select Tomes and Manuscripts from the William P. Bonniwell, OP Collection.  The other two are from our foyer exhibits: presently, The Social Art of John J. Fawcett and Frank B. Lanning, and previously, The Winter Days of Providence College.

We are excited to watch this collection grow with each new exhibit! Check it out!

 

Digital Publishing Services has been working with the Special Collections on creating online galleries of present and past library exhibits.  There are presently four gallery exhibits posted to the Digital Commons, our institutional repository. The exhibits include two from our wooden case: presently, Nineteenth-Century British and American Book Covers, and previously, Select Tomes and Manuscripts from the William […]MORE

Spring Publishing

Posted by: on May 14, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

As the semester comes to a close Digital Publishing Services has been busy publishing scholarship from a variety of Providence College conferences, events, and classes.  Here is a selection of the work being added to the repository:

Annual Undergraduate Conference on Health and Society
In its fifth year, this conference attracts submissions from around the country.  Conference presenters are selected through a peer-review process.  This year’s topics included the Affordable Care Act and insurance marketplaces, challenges in contemporary global health practice, and gendered dimensions of health.

Second Annual Cleary Lecture
The annual lecture honors the memory of Rev. Edward L. Cleary, O.P., a professor of Political Science at Providence College for eighteen years and the director of the Latin American Studies program for twelve years.  This year’s lecture, Prospects for Peace in Colombia, was presented by Virgina Bouvier of the U.S. Institute of Peace.  A video of the lecture is available through Digital Commons.

Annual Celebration of Student Scholarship and Creativity
This year marked the fifth Annual Celebration.  We are currently working with several students to publish their scholarship from the event.

Liberal Arts Honors Program
This Spring we are partnering with English faculty Bill Hogan to publish student scholarship from the Liberal Arts Honors Colloquium, Dostoevsky.

As the semester comes to a close Digital Publishing Services has been busy publishing scholarship from a variety of Providence College conferences, events, and classes.  Here is a selection of the work being added to the repository: Annual Undergraduate Conference on Health and Society In its fifth year, this conference attracts submissions from around the […]MORE

Try DIY, Not Green Or Gold Open Access

Posted by: on May 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Harvey Goldstein and John Bynner, writing in the Opinion section of the UK’s online weekly magazine reporting on higher education news and issues, Times Higher Education, take a very direct approach to the future of scholarly publishing: DIY (Do It Yourself). Goldstein and Bynner find the Green and Gold Open Access approaches unacceptable–both still conceding too large profit margins to commercial scholarly publishers. Goldstein and Bynner believe in time that high-quality publishing tools and academy-controlled journal publishing will “make the gold-green debate increasingly irrelevant.”

For more read their article here.

Harvey Goldstein and John Bynner, writing in the Opinion section of the UK’s online weekly magazine reporting on higher education news and issues, Times Higher Education, take a very direct approach to the future of scholarly publishing: DIY (Do It Yourself). Goldstein and Bynner find the Green and Gold Open Access approaches unacceptable–both still conceding […]MORE

INTI’s Artists: Mario Toral

Posted by: on May 1, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Every issue of the Inti journal that we digitize features artwork by well-known artists. One of best known, featured in several issues, including Numéros 65-66 and 69-70, is Mario Toral.

Mario Toral Muñoz is a Chilean-born painter and photographer, who, at 16, relocated to Argentina, before studying as a fine art student in Uruguay and France. He settled in New York from 1973-92, where he established himself professionally, regularly participating in exhibitions. One of his most famous works, a mural entitled Visual Memory of a Nation, is located in the Santiago Metro station at the Universidad de Chile. The massive piece took him three years to complete, from 1996-99.

Universidad_de_Chile_8Visual Memory of a Nation, by Mario Toral, Santiago Metro station

You can see Mario Toral’s work, as well as work from other artists, in the pages of Inti. Visit DPS’s Inti issue archive, Inti Gallery, and Inti website to view past issues and find out about new publications.

Every issue of the Inti journal that we digitize features artwork by well-known artists. One of best known, featured in several issues, including Numéros 65-66 and 69-70, is Mario Toral. Mario Toral Muñoz is a Chilean-born painter and photographer, who, at 16, relocated to Argentina, before studying as a fine art student in Uruguay and […]MORE

IRENE Audio Preservation

Posted by: on April 25, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

irene

Yesterday, I was fortunate to attend a fascinating lecture on audio preservation given by Thomas Reiger of the Northeast Document Conservation Center. The specific focus of the lecture was on a new preservation system known as IRENE, a digital imaging system that converts captured visual data (2D and 3D, depending on the analog format) and converts that data into listenable audio waveforms.

IRENE (short for “Image, Reconstruct, Erase Noise, Etc.”) first utilizes high-resolution 2D and 3D camera technology to safely document with extreme precision the physical state of analog audio discs and wax cylinders. Following this capturing process, the software creates an image map of the whole physical object and determines, based on the physical state of the grooves, what the raw audio waveform would be. This proves to be an extremely effective system when working with fragile or broken audio materials that otherwise would be destroyed through other transcription processes.

The output of the waveform, according to Reiger, is then presented in a “pure” archival state – meaning that little to no audio engineering treatments are applied by the NEDCC. This is an intentional decision on behalf of the organization, as they want to follow a digitization model that prioritizes cultural and material integrity. The end result, as can be heard on the IRENE Seeing Sound Blog, is remarkable – especially when considering that many of the original objects would be otherwise unplayable. (Of particular note is the Helen Hartness Flanders Archive, hosted by Middlebury College, and the work the NEDCC has done with the Woody Guthrie Archives.)

I asked Reiger if the NEDCC was investigating models of crowd-sourcing the engineering of these files, so that a range of desired interpolations could be offered to various audiences. This, to an extent, is being considered and the NEDCC is already working with engineers seeking to offer curated versions of the material. It will be interesting to see how the IRENE technology develops over time and how models of support might shift with a greater adoption of inter-media transcription technologies.

Yesterday, I was fortunate to attend a fascinating lecture on audio preservation given by Thomas Reiger of the Northeast Document Conservation Center. The specific focus of the lecture was on a new preservation system known as IRENE, a digital imaging system that converts captured visual data (2D and 3D, depending on the analog format) and […]MORE

The National Jukebox at the Library of Congress

Posted by: on April 15, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally.Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 10.36.47 AM

The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.

You can find out more about the project here .

This project often involves a painstaking process of analyzing various copies of the same 78rpm recording  and finding just the right one for digitization.

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Here is a slideshow example of the workflow process from beginning to end.

The Library of Congress has been working on a great project called the National Jukebox, making historic sound recordings from their collection available for the first time digitally. The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary […]MORE

Media Hub site officially launched

Posted by: on April 11, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

http://www.providence.edu/library/PublishingImages/rotator-images/media-hub%20rotator/mediaHub3.jpg

The MediaHub is a campus collaborative space that offers patrons support in creating, editing, and producing a wide range of multimedia, and now it’s website is officially launched!

Check it out here

Get access to Media Hub tutorials, peruse the listing of loanable Media Hub equipment, or take a look at some photos in the image gallery! If you have any feedback or suggestions for the Media Hub site do not hesitate to email them to dps@providence.edu.

 

The MediaHub is a campus collaborative space that offers patrons support in creating, editing, and producing a wide range of multimedia, and now it’s website is officially launched! Check it out here Get access to Media Hub tutorials, peruse the listing of loanable Media Hub equipment, or take a look at some photos in the […]MORE

Exploring Digital Curation

Posted by: on April 4, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Here in Digital Publishing Services (DPS) we work with digital objects every day.  We scan, process, store, and present a wide variety of digital content in many formats.  We are engaged in aspects of the digital curation process, but we don’t often label it as such.

I set out to locate some introductory resources about digital curation to help me better understand the field.  Here’s a selection of what I found:

DCC Curation Lifecycle Model
DCC Curation LifecycleThe Digital Curation Centre is a UK-based organization that specializes in digital information curation “with a focus on building capacity, capability and skills for research data management across the UK’s higher education research community.”  The Centre presents a wealth of helpful resources on digital curation including How-To guides and case studies.

The DCC presents the Digital Curation Lifecycle Model pictured above.  As someone new to the field, this lifecycle model is a little daunting.  Luckily, I cam across a helpful webinar presented by Lisa Snider and the ALA ACRL Digital Curation Interest Group that broke down the lifecycle model into manageable “pieces of the digital curation pie.”  Lisa outlines the pieces as:

Digital Objects (Data)
Selection and Acquisition
Appraisal
Arrangement and Description
Metadata Creation
Preservation
Migration
Storage
Access

Each of these items deserve more attention, and I’ll expand upon them in further posts.  Lisa’s presentation emphasized that digital curation goes beyond digital preservation.  Preservation is one very important (and often challenging) part of the larger digital curation lifecycle.

I plan to deepen my understanding of this subject through the upcoming MOOC, Introduction to Digital Curation, presented by University College London.  Interested?  Join me!

Here in Digital Publishing Services (DPS) we work with digital objects every day.  We scan, process, store, and present a wide variety of digital content in many formats.  We are engaged in aspects of the digital curation process, but we don’t often label it as such. I set out to locate some introductory resources about […]MORE

Party & Society, Dr. Cedric de Leon

Posted by: on March 26, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Party & Society Book Cover

Providence College’s Dr. Cedric de Leon from the Department of Sociology has published his first book, Party & Society, with Polity Press. Dr. de Leon examines the ways in which social scientists and other observers have imagined the relationship between parties and society, offering a succinct and lively analysis that outlines the key thinking in the field. Several weeks ago Chris Machado, Providence College’s Academic Communications Director, spoke with Dr. de Leon to discuss Party & Society–video interview here.

A book launch celebration [see poster below] sponsored by Sociology, Global Studies, and the Office of Institutional Diversity will be held on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. The afternoon launch and celebration will begin at 3:30pm with an author-meets-critics session in Siena 200 followed by a reception at 5:00pm in the Department of Sociology, Howley Hall. To rsvp please email cdeleon@providence.edu.

Party & Society Book LaunchPoster

Providence College’s Dr. Cedric de Leon from the Department of Sociology has published his first book, Party & Society, with Polity Press. Dr. de Leon examines the ways in which social scientists and other observers have imagined the relationship between parties and society, offering a succinct and lively analysis that outlines the key thinking in the field. […]MORE

Library E-Faire on April 1st!

Posted by: on March 21, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

e-faire poster

On Tuesday April 1st, Phillips Memorial Library will host an e-faire on the main level of the library, which will include food and prizes!  Stop by from 3-5pm to see what is new in the world of online resources, and enter for a chance to win an iPod shuffle and iTunes gift card.  Digital Publishing Services will be there to promote new resources, BrowZine and SelectedWorks.  For more info about this event, please click here.

mrtImages courtesy of PML Access Services.

On Tuesday April 1st, Phillips Memorial Library will host an e-faire on the main level of the library, which will include food and prizes!  Stop by from 3-5pm to see what is new in the world of online resources, and enter for a chance to win an iPod shuffle and iTunes gift card.  Digital Publishing […]MORE

Browse articles from your tablet with BrowZine

Posted by: on March 6, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

BrowZine is a great new service, available from the Phillips Memorial Library, that allows you to browse and read many of the library’s scholarly journals from an iPad or Android tablet.

From the BrowZine website:

BrowZineLogo-FINAL COLOR

BrowZine delivers thousands of academic journals to your iPad or Android tablet.

BrowZine works by organizing the articles found in Open Access and subscription databases, uniting them into complete journals, then arranging these journals on a common newsstand.  The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines.

Get started using Browzine in three easy steps:

  • From your iPad or Android tablet, go to your app store (Apple App Store, Google Play or Amazon), search for “BrowZine” and download it for free
  • Open BrowZine and select our library from the list
  • Enter your username and library bar code (14 digit code on the back of your PC ID)

Then start browsing and reading your scholarly journals!

Browse your Discipline or favorite Journal title from here:

photo2 copy

 

Select an Article and Add to your own personal “Bookshelf”:

photo cropphoto_a

It is recommended that you download a free PDF reader App (such as Adobe Reader), so you can save your PDFs and search within the article and edit as needed.

 

Happy browsing!

 

BrowZine is a great new service, available from the Phillips Memorial Library, that allows you to browse and read many of the library’s scholarly journals from an iPad or Android tablet. From the BrowZine website: BrowZine delivers thousands of academic journals to your iPad or Android tablet. BrowZine works by organizing the articles found in […]MORE

Hoopla and borrowing digital media

Posted by: on February 27, 2014   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

hoopla

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per individual use but allows for unlimited simultaneous access.

The Kansas City library will limit patrons to 12 Hoopla checkouts a month. Each episode of a TV show is one checkout.

But patrons have access to videos for 72 hours, to music CDs for seven days and to audiobooks for three weeks. After the time is up, the material is automatically deleted, eliminating the possibility of late-return fees.

The Kansas City Public library has recently introduced a purely digital multimedia service for it’s patrons with the help of Hoopla. Patrons can “borrow” multimedia from Hoopla’s catalog of over 100,000 items including audio, video, and audiobooks right from their mobile device. Rather than charge libraries a subscription fee, Hoopla charges between $.99 – $2.99 per […]MORE

Digital Humantites Awards

Posted by: on February 19, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

humanities matter infographicIt’s award season time of year, and we are always interested in the DH Awards!  These annual awards allow the public to nominate and vote on exemplary projects in the digital humanities community.  Here are 2013’s winners:

Best DH visualization or infographic: Infographic – the Humanities Matter

Best use of DH for fun: Serendip-o-matic
“Serendip-o-matic connects your sources to digital materials located in libraries, museums, and archives around the world. By first examining your research interests, and then identifying related content in locations such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Europeana, and Flickr Commons, our serendipity engine helps you discover photographs, documents, maps and other primary sources.”

Best DH tool or suite of tools: Commons In A Box
“Commons In A Box (CBOX) is a free software project aimed at turning the infrastructure that successfully powers the CUNY Academic Commons into a free, distributable, easy-to-install package.” “CBOX takes the complexity out of creating a Commons site, helping organizations create a space where their members can discuss issues, collaborate on projects, and share their work.”

Best DH blog post, article, or short publication: “‘Psychopower’ of Cultural Diplomacy in the Information Age” by Natalia Grincheva

Best DH project for public audiences: Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive
See our post on Our Marathon from November.

Best DH contribution not in the English language: Eä – Revista de Humanidades Médicas & Estudios Sociales de la Ciencia y la Tecnología

Explore more and learn about the runners up at: http://dhawards.org/dhawards2013/results/ or on Twitter @dhawards

It’s award season time of year, and we are always interested in the DH Awards!  These annual awards allow the public to nominate and vote on exemplary projects in the digital humanities community.  Here are 2013’s winners: Best DH visualization or infographic: Infographic – the Humanities Matter Best use of DH for fun: Serendip-o-matic “Serendip-o-matic […]MORE

Cultural Anthropology Goes Open Access

Posted by: on February 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This week, a prominent journal in anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, has gone open access. Cultural Anthropology is a peer-reviewed academic journal, which covers issues related to theory, research, public dissemination, and ethnography (across a variety of perspectives) in the field of anthropology. The journal going open access means that it has become freely available to the public without any cost associated. This status will allow for new opportunities in scholarship, communication, and dialogue to occur. The open access movement has arisen, in part, in protest to the privatization of intellectual work. For more about this new development, please click here.

JCA

This week, a prominent journal in anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, has gone open access. Cultural Anthropology is a peer-reviewed academic journal, which covers issues related to theory, research, public dissemination, and ethnography (across a variety of perspectives) in the field of anthropology. The journal going open access means that it has become freely available to the […]MORE

MediaHub Loanable Equipment

Posted by: on January 31, 2014   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

mediahub2

We’re excited to announce that an assortment of MediaHub hardware is available for patron loan later in the Spring 2014 semester! In the interest of expanding our multimedia services and facilities, patrons are now able to work on their multimedia projects outside the scope of our physical space and hours. All loanable material is viewable through the HELIN catalog and can be checked out in the Phillips Memorial Library. (Loan periods of items may vary.) Introductory training on the equipment can be offered via appointment (dps@providence.edu).

Here is a brief listing of some items available through the MediaHub:

  • Panasonic HC-X900M HD camcorders
  • Canon PowerShot G15 digital cameras
  • Tascam DR-40 portable audio recorders
  • Wacom Intuos 5 tablets
  • AKAI USB MIDI keyboards

For a full listing, please visit the HELIN catalog entry or inquire at dps@providence.edu.

 

 

 

We’re excited to announce that an assortment of MediaHub hardware is available for patron loan later in the Spring 2014 semester! In the interest of expanding our multimedia services and facilities, patrons are now able to work on their multimedia projects outside the scope of our physical space and hours. All loanable material is viewable […]MORE

Copyright Myths and Guidelines

Posted by: on January 23, 2014   |Comments (0)|Open Access

 

On January 16th, DPS attended a workshop called, “Copyright Skills as Risk Management Tools: The Librarians Role,” hosted by the Association of Rhode Island Health Science Libraries at CCRI Lincoln.  Most of  the attendees were medical librarians and had important questions regarding the duplication of medical articles requested by doctors and practitioners. Many brought up the Contu Guidelines. Often citing the ambiguity surrounding what is the proper amount of photocopies to make of a certain article, and highlighting the ignorance of copyright knowledge shown by their requester.

Here are a few interesting links presented at the workshop:

downloadCopyright Myths-a publication of the Graphic Arts Guild: This is a great article that helps to debunk some of the myths surrounding the copyright of creative works, such as music, arts, literature, etc.  Often creating scenarios that  people might be confronted with when wanting to use someone else’s piece of music, photograph, etc. for their own purpose and explaining what the actual laws are regarding those scenarios, and not the “assumptions” of what is correct.

download (1)Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in academic and research libraries: The ARL was created in 1932 to address common issues that university and research librarians might be dealt with. The ARL Code of Best Practices is a set of eight situations that are designed to help librarians make informed decisions regarding what materials can be shared and duplicated for educational and research purposes. And it is important because it enables librarians to have a clearer understanding of what items are fair use and what are not. Here are a few FAQs regarding Best Practices.

  On January 16th, DPS attended a workshop called, “Copyright Skills as Risk Management Tools: The Librarians Role,” hosted by the Association of Rhode Island Health Science Libraries at CCRI Lincoln.  Most of  the attendees were medical librarians and had important questions regarding the duplication of medical articles requested by doctors and practitioners. Many brought […]MORE

Dorr Letters site, big update!

Posted by: on January 17, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

twd1_preview

Do you remember awhile back we posted a sneak peek at some of the upcoming features of the Dorr Letters site? If you don’t, no worries, check it out here. Well, we have finally gone live with those changes!

The Dorr Letters project site now includes:

  • Contextual, informative popups for most persons, places, and organizations within the letters
  • Working date facets, you can now filter letters by the date they were written
  • Working formatting templates, the plain text now mirrors some of the formatting of the actual letters.

Go to the Dorr Letters project site, and check out the updates!

Do you remember awhile back we posted a sneak peek at some of the upcoming features of the Dorr Letters site? If you don’t, no worries, check it out here. Well, we have finally gone live with those changes! The Dorr Letters project site now includes: Contextual, informative popups for most persons, places, and organizations […]MORE

Happy New Year

Posted by: on January 10, 2014   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Happy New Year from the Digital Publishing Services Team!  For us, the new year has meant welcoming a new team member – Stephen Mattos.  Stephen has extensive digitization experience and photography skills.  Most recently, Stephen worked at Roger Williams University where he was the Digital Imaging Specialist in the Architecture Library.  He focused on the digitization and archiving of their slide collection.  We welcome Stephen and look forward to working with him.

There are lots of exciting projects on our horizon for Spring 2014, including:

  • an update to the Dorr Letters Project
  • further collaboration with Special Collections and Archives on digitization projects including digitization of the Army Specialized Training Program collection
  • launch of the Art Journal in Digital Commons, a journal created and edited by PC Art History and Studio Art students
  • continued development of the MediaHub
  • and much more!

We will highlight many of these projects here on the Digital Publishing @ PC Blog.  Hope to see you again soon!

 

 

Happy New Year from the Digital Publishing Services Team!  For us, the new year has meant welcoming a new team member – Stephen Mattos.  Stephen has extensive digitization experience and photography skills.  Most recently, Stephen worked at Roger Williams University where he was the Digital Imaging Specialist in the Architecture Library.  He focused on the […]MORE

bioRxiv: Preprint Server for Biology

Posted by: on December 11, 2013   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

biorxiv

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used to introduce the results of new research within a scholarly community for initial review and feedback.

From Science:

BioRxiv, launched yesterday by the nonprofit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), aims to be biologists’ version of arXiv, the popular preprint server where physicists have shared their draft manuscripts for more than 20 years. The goal is to speed the dissemination of research and give scientists a way to get feedback on their papers before they are formally peer-reviewed.”

For more information read.

Recently, the daily news site of the journal Science announced the creation of a preprint server for Biology. Like for other disciplines with a preprint tradition (e.g., Physics: arXiv, Economics: RePEc), bioRxiv will serve as a platform for biologists to present new ideas and research to their community. Preprints serve as a document type used […]MORE

Dynamic Shape Display & Motion Synth (New Forms of Interactivity)

Posted by: on December 6, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

We in Digital Publishing Services try to closely follow new advances in computing and multimedia, particularly if they directly impact scholarly or artistic creation. So, it was quite exciting to find out about two new projects that could significantly influence creative technologies over the next few years. Here, for your interest, are demo videos of the two systems: the inFORM dynamic shape display and the Motion Synth for iPhone and iPod Touch.

inFORM dynamic shape display (MIT)

The first is a “dynamic shape display” developed by MIT’s Tangible Media Group. This interface allows users to “interact with digital information in a tangible way” by physically rendering 3D content through a grid of digitally-controlled columns. It’s a very captivating project, and seems to have potential both in terms of teaching and creative generation, but also as a useful technology for disabilities access.

Motion Synth for iPhone and iPod Touch (AUUG)

AUUG’s Motion Synth offers a simple solution for gestural composition with the iPhone – an specially-designed aluminum frame that is fastened around the user’s hand, ensuring that the device won’t fall and that access to the touch screen isn’t impeded. While this may seem like just a matter of ergonomics at first, AUUG has also create a program that would utilize the device’s internal sensing, relaying the physical information back to a compatible musical software or hardware. In effect, you can modify sounds in new, physically expressive ways through this system. One can envision this offering a very unique and approachable way of creating and engaging with multimedia works.

For more information, see the project pages at MIT and AUUG:

http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/

http://www.auug.com/

We in Digital Publishing Services try to closely follow new advances in computing and multimedia, particularly if they directly impact scholarly or artistic creation. So, it was quite exciting to find out about two new projects that could significantly influence creative technologies over the next few years. Here, for your interest, are demo videos of […]MORE

Open Access Button recently launched

Posted by: on November 25, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser.

“People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it slows innovation, kills curiosity and harms patients. This is an indictment of the current system. Open Access has given us the solution to this problem by allowing everyone to read and re-use research. We created the Open Access Button to track the impact of paywalls and help you get access to the research you need. By using the button you’ll help show the impact of this problem, drive awareness of the issue, and help change the system. Furthermore, the Open Access Button has several ways of helping you get access to the research you need right now.”

Be sure to check out the map to see the breakdown of paywalls across the globe. Hint: zooming in will afford a more granular look at the paywall statistics.

The Open Access Button, a bookmarklet that tracks paywalls to research materials, and offers tools to find free versions of those materials, was just recently released. Check out the official website, and download the button for your browser. “People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it […]MORE

Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive

Posted by: on November 19, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A team from Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Net­works  (a research center for Dig­ital Human­i­ties and Com­pu­ta­tional Social Sci­ence) has devel­op­ed an extensive, crowd-sourced, dig­ital archive fea­turing sto­ries, photos, videos, oral his­to­ries, social media, and other mate­rials related to the Boston Marathon bomb­ings that took place on April 15, 2013.  The archive “will allow the public to explore not only what happened during the event, but also how the event was experienced by Bostonians, visitors to the city, and those many members of the Boston diaspora who were far away but deeply engaged in the unfolding events. The archive will serve as a long-term memorial, preserving these records for students and researchers, providing future historians with invaluable, local windows into an important national event.”

Explore the Our Marathon site or learn more on Twitter @OurMarathon

Screen Shot 2013-11-19 at 12.11.20 PM

A team from Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Net­works  (a research center for Dig­ital Human­i­ties and Com­pu­ta­tional Social Sci­ence) has devel­op­ed an extensive, crowd-sourced, dig­ital archive fea­turing sto­ries, photos, videos, oral his­to­ries, social media, and other mate­rials related to the Boston Marathon bomb­ings that took place on April 15, 2013.  The archive “will […]MORE

Archiving Public Broadcasting

Posted by: on November 14, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The archive will eventually be hosted online and will be freely available to the public.

Read through the Library of Congress’s release here

The Library of Congress will begin an ambitious project funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting wherein some 40,000 hours of public broadcasting dating back to the 1950’s will be digitally archived. Content will come from approximately 120 different public broadcasting stations (including WGBH Boston!) and will include interviews with John F. Kennedy and Ronald […]MORE

Digitizing Frankenstein

Posted by: on November 7, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Phase one of the Shelley-Godwin Archive has recently launched with digitized versions of all the known manuscripts of Frankenstein. The Archive is the result of institutional partnerships: New York Public Library, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, Oxford’s Bodleian Library, with contributions from the Huntington Library, the British Library, and the Houghton Library—totaling over 90% of all known relevant manuscripts.

Subsequent Shelley-Goodwin Archive project phases will include digitization of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft, “bringing together online for the first time ever the widely dispersed handwritten legacy of this uniquely gifted family of writers.”

shelley-frankenstein

Read More.

Phase one of the Shelley-Godwin Archive has recently launched with digitized versions of all the known manuscripts of Frankenstein. The Archive is the result of institutional partnerships: New York Public Library, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, Oxford’s Bodleian Library, with contributions from the Huntington Library, the British Library, and the Houghton Library—totaling over […]MORE

The Library Publishing Directory, 1st Edition

Posted by: on November 1, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

lpc

Last week, the Library Publishing Coalition publicly announced the first edition of the Library Publishing Directory, a “snapshot of the publishing activities of 115 academic and research libraries (primarily in North America).” Detailed in the document are various methods of publication, services offered, staffing and funding data, and prospective projects. Sharing documentation of this nature will not only inform the practices of library publishing departments, but will also offer scholars and authors a useful means of identifying higher-ed publication options. As stated in the LPC’s announcement:

In documenting the breadth and depth of activities in this field, this resource aims to articulate the unique value of library publishing; establish it as a significant and growing community of practice; and to raise its visibility within a number of stakeholder communities…

On first glance, it certainly seems likely to satisfy many of those aims, a development we here at DPS would be pleased to see!

The document is available as a PDF, EPUB, or print copy (by order):

http://www.librarypublishing.org/resources/directory-library-publishing-services

 

Last week, the Library Publishing Coalition publicly announced the first edition of the Library Publishing Directory, a “snapshot of the publishing activities of 115 academic and research libraries (primarily in North America).” Detailed in the document are various methods of publication, services offered, staffing and funding data, and prospective projects. Sharing documentation of this nature […]MORE

The Bookless Library

Posted by: on October 24, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Bexar Library

Just recently, the nations first completely digital, e-reader only library opened its doors. While the physical library is ostensibly unnecessary, (the entire collection can be viewed from a home computer or other capable device) the space remains important to the community as many in the Bexar area do not have access to computers and/or broadband internet.

“Our digital library is stored in the cloud, so you don’t have to come in to get a book. But we’re a traditional library in that the building itself is an important community space.” –  Laura Cole, BiblioTech’s special projects coordinator

The idea originated with Nelson Wolff, a Bexar County Judge, who had felt that libraries were lagging behind current technologies. Read more about Wolff and Bexar County Digital Library.

Check out the Bexar County Digital Library

 

Update:

NBC has done a story about the library, here is the video!

Just recently, the nations first completely digital, e-reader only library opened its doors. While the physical library is ostensibly unnecessary, (the entire collection can be viewed from a home computer or other capable device) the space remains important to the community as many in the Bexar area do not have access to computers and/or broadband […]MORE

Dorr Letters Site: Update In The Works

Posted by: on October 16, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

Dorr Popups

The Dorr Letters site will be looking a bit differently in the coming weeks. We’ve been at work creating and implementing some new content that will be weaved into each letter. The goal is to allow users the ability to click on the name of a person, place, or organization and be served a quick morsel of information about that person/place/organization. We’re currently working on setting up this workflow for all three information types as well as filling out the content behind the curtains so that none of the popups come up empty!

We took a bit of inspiration from the Colonial Despatches website created by the Humanities Computing and Media Centre, University of Victoria:

Check out their work here: http://bcgenesis.uvic.ca/index.htm

The Dorr Letters site will be looking a bit differently in the coming weeks. We’ve been at work creating and implementing some new content that will be weaved into each letter. The goal is to allow users the ability to click on the name of a person, place, or organization and be served a quick […]MORE

Dorr Rebellion Project Site Highlighted in The Junto

Posted by: on October 10, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03, ’05G and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) and Mr. Russell DeSimone (’67, local historian and collector) recently posted about the Dorr Rebellion Project Site on the early Americanists blog, The Junto. Dr. Chaput and Mr. DeSimone provide beautifully written, content-rich historical context leading up to and surrounding “the constitutional crisis that erupted in Rhode Island in 1841-1842.” The Dorr Rebellion Project Site is the resulting collaboration of the Phillips Memorial Library+Commons (Providence College), Dr. Erik Chaput and Mr. Russell DeSimone.

Junto

View Dr. Chaput and Mr. DeSimone’s post here.

Providence College’s Dr. Erik Chaput (’03, ’05G and faculty in the School of Continuing Education) and Mr. Russell DeSimone (’67, local historian and collector) recently posted about the Dorr Rebellion Project Site on the early Americanists blog, The Junto. Dr. Chaput and Mr. DeSimone provide beautifully written, content-rich historical context leading up to and surrounding […]MORE

Letters of 1916: Creating History

Posted by: on October 4, 2013   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Trinity College Dublin has launched what it is calling “the first public humanities project in Ireland.” The Letters of 1916 project is crowd-sourcing digital history through public engagement and community collection building to commemorate the centenary of the Easter Rising (1 November 1915 – 31 October 1916). Community members are being invited to participate in the project by uploading private letters and photographs dating from the period.

LettersProject1916

For more details see Letters of 1916: Creating History.

Trinity College Dublin has launched what it is calling “the first public humanities project in Ireland.” The Letters of 1916 project is crowd-sourcing digital history through public engagement and community collection building to commemorate the centenary of the Easter Rising (1 November 1915 – 31 October 1916). Community members are being invited to participate in […]MORE

HELIN Digital Collections Now on Twitter (#digHELIN)

Posted by: on September 27, 2013   |Comments (0)|Digital Publishing

dighelin_banner

Following a series of discussions about promotion and outreach, the HELIN Digital Collections Affinity Group has now joined Twitter (@digHELIN) and started an associated hashtag (#dighelin). One intended purpose of the #dighelin campaign is to further interconnect and aggregate HELIN’s digital collections, similar in effect to the HELIN Digital Commons site. By using hashtag mobilization though, the platform-open campaign additionally allows for aggregation on multiple platforms (e.g. Twitter, Tumblr, etc.) and allows patrons and other viewers further interaction. It is hoped that the the #dighelin campaign will be a meaningful way of engaging the HELIN community and beyond. So please considering following and keep an eye out for any upcoming posts by the Phillips Memorial Library (@clubphil_pc)!

Following a series of discussions about promotion and outreach, the HELIN Digital Collections Affinity Group has now joined Twitter (@digHELIN) and started an associated hashtag (#dighelin). One intended purpose of the #dighelin campaign is to further interconnect and aggregate HELIN’s digital collections, similar in effect to the HELIN Digital Commons site. By using hashtag mobilization […]MORE

MediaHub Catalog

Posted by: on September 19, 2013   |Comments (3)|Facilities and Tools

2As we continue situating and preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing an inventory catalog, for use by patrons.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase all of the MediaHub’s static/loanable equipment, along with specifications and features for each item.

The catalog’s design riffs off of, and complements, other branding that we have developed for the MediaHub over recent weeks. A printed copy will be available in the MediaHub, Access Services, and on the web.  Provided here is a sample page from the catalog.  More to come soon!

As we continue situating and preparing the MediaHub’s equipment for stationary use and loan, we at DPS have begun developing an inventory catalog, for use by patrons.  The purpose of the catalog will be to showcase all of the MediaHub’s static/loanable equipment, along with specifications and features for each item. The catalog’s design riffs off […]MORE

MediaHub Tutorials

Posted by: on September 13, 2013   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video production; basic audio editing; media backup and archiving; online video services; and more! So, here is the first installment on basic video production. In the video, I’ll demonstrate to you how to record video, transfer it to an iMac, edit the footage in iMovie, and share the final project on YouTube. And certainly, if anyone viewing this has questions following the video, you are more than welcome to contact the DPS department at dps@providence.edu.

Stay tuned for other installments!

http://bit.ly/dpstutorials

Seeing as the MediaHub is up and running for our patrons, and much of the equipment is being prepared for loan, we at DPS thought it would be helpful to offer some video tutorials related to the MediaHub and its tech complement. This will be an ongoing series focusing on subjects such as: basic video […]MORE

Library Spaces

Posted by: on September 5, 2013   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Hello all,

This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the pipeline like tying in space requesting, video tours, and possibly an interactive floor plan. The site is still in very early development, we’re hoping we can get something up and published before the semester is over, maybe even before October hits. Hopefully!

 

If you’re interested in some of the inspiration behind our Library Spaces site, check out some of our favorites below:

http://libraries.mit.edu/study/ – MIT’s setup is super clean and functional, they’ve managed to fit all of the important information about a space into a neat little block of content. I like the use of icons here as well.

http://www.library.ucsf.edu/services/computing – UCSF breaks down their spaces by function, which I think is super handy for students who need to get something done in the library but might not know exactly where to go to do it.

http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/learningspaces – NCSU has a great multimedia component complementing their spaces page(s). Nice pictures and a slick gallery highlight the spaces nicely.

Hello all, This post is a sneak peek of sorts into a new project Library+Commons staff are working on codenamed “spaces”. The idea behind the project is to guide users/patrons to the correct areas of the library based on the task that they need to complete. We’ve got a bunch of interesting ideas in the […]MORE