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Prince and Copyright

Posted by: on June 29, 2017   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news, and two stories of note have emerged in recent months.

The first centers around a fair use debate (similar to the fair use case covered in an earlier post, regarding Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a reference photo as inspiration for the piece). The estate of Andy Warhol has filed suit against New York City photographer, Lynn Goldsmith, as a preemptive strike against her to protect Warhol’s legacy; according to the NY Daily News, Goldsmith had been expected to file a copyright infringement lawsuit against the estate. Goldsmith alleges that Warhol used a photo she took of Prince in 1981 as inspiration for his Prince Series (created in 1984) without asking or crediting her.

The estate argues that Warhol’s appropriation of the photo was transformative enough to be considered new work (therefore, fair use under U.S. copyright law) and Goldsmith is ignoring this aspect in an extortion attempt. Estate lawyer, Luke Nikas, stated in court documents that, “Although Warhol often used photographs taken by others as inspiration for his portraits, Warhol’s works were entirely new creations. As would be plain to any reasonable observer, each portrait in Warhol’s Prince Series fundamentally transformed the visual aesthetic and meaning of the Prince Publicity Photograph.” When asked why she did not pursue legal measures at any point over the past 30 years, Goldsmith said that she was only made aware of the pieces in 2016, when Condé Nast published a special issue called, The Genius of Prince. The estate counters that she knew of the pieces as far back as 1984, when she granted permission to Vanity Fair to publish one of them.

Prince’s image isn’t the only thing sparking debate – his catalog of work is, as well. While his Warner Bros. music catalog was released earlier this year to digital streaming platforms, his videography remains largely inaccessible to the public due to copyright dispute. Will his full videography be made available at some point? And further, will the public ever gain access to the material in his Paisley Park estate’s storied vault? It’s been speculated that nearly all of the contents of the vault lack thorough rights contracts. Prince’s estate has been in flux for some time, as it battles to resolve contractual disputes with Universal and Warner over rights. Since his passing in April 2016, various issues involving rights have arisen – the hope is for speedy resolution to all issues of copyright, so the public may freely access his work. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news, and two stories of note have emerged in recent months. The first centers around a fair use debate (similar to the fair use case covered in an earlier post, regarding Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a reference photo as inspiration […]MORE

30,000 Getty Museum Images Published in Sleek New Viewer

Posted by: on June 23, 2017   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The IIIF Mirador viewer showing the Getty Museum’s Van Tromp Going about to Please His Masters (left) and the Yale Center for British Art’s Dort or Dordrecht: The Dort Packet-Boat from Rotterdam Becalmed (right), both by J.M.W. Turner

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images are from the Open Content Program, a collection of images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the pubic domain. All images added to the program in the future will be immediately available in the new viewer.

To browse the images and play with the Mirador viewer, you can go to getty.edu and search the collection – any image with a blue and read IIIF icon underneath it can be viewed in the new viewer (check out Van Gogh’s Irises).

To do a side-by-side comparison:

  1. Select an artwork from the Getty Museum online collection that has a IIIF icon (just below the image and to the right).
  2. Click the IIIF icon to open the Mirador viewer.
  3. Select “Change Layout” at the top right to add one or more slots where you’d like additional artwork images to display.
  4. Select another artwork (with an IIIF icon) that you’d like to compare. Go to the webpage for this object and drag the IIIF icon from that browser tab or window into the new slot you’ve just created. The two images will now appear side by side.

Enjoy!

Earlier this month, the Getty published more than 30,000 images from the Getty Museum’s collection using the sleek IIIF media viewer, Mirador. The Mirador viewer allows you to smoothly zoom and pan around an image, as well as compare multiple works from the collection, and eventually you’ll also be able to annotate works. The newly available images […]MORE

The MediaHub Gets A Welcome Upgrade

Posted by: on June 15, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard for the last few months revamping the MediaHub with the intent of making it a more active workspace for students, faculty, and staff.  The intention is to make this more like a “Makerspace,” as many other libraries have done across the country.  This is still a work in progress, but we have acquired a few items to get closer to reaching our goal of a creating a fully functioning Makerspace-type lab. The lab includes four iMacs that include a host of audio and video editing software, such as Adobe Premiere, Final Cut Pro, and Adobe Audition. The lab also includes microphones and audio interface devices that can be used for podcasting, etc. And we recently added a green screen kit that includes lights and a tripod to hold various cameras, so that students can create compelling video and still camera projects.  Additionally, we purchased a button maker and a few smartphone VR headsets to add to the creative process.  Please come by the MediaHub and get creative!

Digital Publishing Services has been working hard for the last few months revamping the MediaHub with the intent of making it a more active workspace for students, faculty, and staff.  The intention is to make this more like a “Makerspace,” as many other libraries have done across the country.  This is still a work in progress, […]MORE

DPS Collaborates with Faculty and Archives on “Sons of Providence” Digital Exhibit

Posted by: on May 5, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the library’s Special Collections and Archives.

Building off the work done on the Theology Collections Portal, Doctors Illuzzi and Urbano worked to create a digital exhibit, Sons of Providence, through which they could share the archival materials and photographs that had informed their research along with multimedia elements including a documentary made in collaboration with Film Studies Minor Joseph Aiello ’17, an interactive map, and a wealth of photographs and primary documents. The Digital Publishing Services Coordinator supported the faculty as they created the exhibit using the Scalar platform. Two library-owned iPad kiosks configured to present the digital exhibit were installed as part of a physical exhibit in Harkins Hall during the spring of 2017. DPS staff photographed the exhibit and the images are available at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/exhibits_sons_providence/ . Another installation of the exhibit and kiosks will take place in the library in the coming year.

Dr. Jennifer Illuzzi, assistant professor of history, and Dr. Arthur Urbano, associate professor of theology, conducted research related to the admission and experiences of Jewish students at Providence College prior to the Second Vatican Council, when the Catholic Church officially entered into interreligious dialogue. Their research was conducted in large part using materials from the […]MORE

Cornell’s Hip Hop Collection Releases Hundreds of Digitized Images

Posted by: on April 21, 2017   |Comment (1)|Digital Asset Management

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill Adler‘s personal archive. Adler served as director of publicity for Def Jam Records and Rush Artist Management from 1984-1990, where he worked alongside producers Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons, during an era when the label released notable albums by Public Enemy, LL Cool J, Beastie Boys, Slick Rick, Run-DMC, EPMD, and De La Soul. Cornell’s curator of rare books and manuscripts, Katherine Reagan, comments that, “Bill’s files are a rich and deep resource for the study of hip-hop’s emergence in the popular press and as a force within the music industry, and they enrich our understanding of hip-hop’s 40-year history.”

The Hip Hop Collection is part of the Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. They received Adler’s archive in 2013, but the newly added pieces represent only 5 percent of the full archive – the rest can be seen in person at the library, for now. The library plans to digitize the rest of Adler’s archive over the next few years, and this recent batch includes over 1700 images. Adler started collecting in the 70s, when there were few resources about hip-hop and the internet did not exist. “But there was a tremendous explosion of writing about hip-hop in real time,” he said. “I’m thrilled to know that the collection is going to be made available to anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection, anywhere in the world.” (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

According to an article from last week’s Cornell Chronicle, the Cornell University Library has recently added hundreds of digitized images to their Hip Hop Collection. The images help tell the story of hip hop’s inception and history. The new pieces include news articles, photos, and press packets, and are sourced from American music journalist Bill […]MORE

DPS Goes to DigiCamp

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comment (1)|Facilities and Tools

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology.

This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by Carolyn Goldstein and Andrew Elder on the Mass Memories Road Show, a state-wide digital history project that documents people, places, and events in Massachusetts history. The photographs and stories are preserved and publicly accessible in UMass Boston’s Open Archives.

The breakout session topics, collaboratively chosen by participants in advance of the event, included Technology for Users; Accessibility; Social Media/Marketing/Outreach; Digital Humanities, Preservation, and Pedagogy; VR/Video Games; Web/Course Guide Design and UX; Instructional Design/Teaching with Technology; OER, Open Access, and Altmetrics; Makerspaces; Interfaces & Collections; Cool Tools; and Assessment & Data. I attended the Technology for Users, VR/Video Games, and Makerspaces sessions, and got some great ideas for our MediaHub in Phillips Memorial Library.
The highlight of the day was a tour of and workshop in the UMass Boston MakerSpace lab, where we saw some 3D printing in action and learned the basics of 3D design, including a tutorial in Tinkercad, a free, web-based 3D design tool.

Looking forward to next year!

For another year in a row, DPS and a couple of other librarians from Phillips Memorial Library participated in DigiCamp, an annual unConference sponsored by the ACRL NEC Information Technology Interest Group (ITIG) that focuses on how libraries are using technology. This year’s event was hosted at UMass Boston and the day began with a great presentation by […]MORE

New Library Exhibits Now Available

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services has been busy capturing the library’s most recent exhibitions and adding them to our Digital Commons image galleries. Exhibits include: Sister Saints of the Dominican Order, featuring seven female saints rotated throughout the Spring semester 2017, Albertus Magnus: St. Albert the Great, in honor of a lecture in Providence College’s Aquinas Hall on November 10, 2016, Opening Ceremonies of Providence College, September 18, 1919, featuring photographs from Providence College’s opening, and Providence College Charter Day, created in honor of Providence College celebrating its centennial of the signing of its charter on February 14, 2017.

Albertus Magnus: St. Albert The Great Exhibit Case – Photo 1, Fall 2016

Harkins Hall Dedication Ceremonies, May 25, 1919

Charter Day Exhibit Case – Photo 2, Spring 2017

St. Rosa of Lima – Reproduction, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, ca.1670

Digital Publishing Services has been busy capturing the library’s most recent exhibitions and adding them to our Digital Commons image galleries. Exhibits include: Sister Saints of the Dominican Order, featuring seven female saints rotated throughout the Spring semester 2017, Albertus Magnus: St. Albert the Great, in honor of a lecture in Providence College’s Aquinas Hall on November […]MORE

Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of fame are represented, from Elizabeth I and Aphra Behn to anonymous and pseudonymous writers. Here are just a few of the texts:


Cavendish, Margaret (Lucas), Duchess of Newcastle: The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing-World, 1667. An early work of sci-fi!

Neither was it a wonder that the men did freeze to death; for they were not onely driven to the very end or point of the Pole of that World, but even to another Pole of another World, which joined close to it…

By this Poetical Description, you may perceive, that my ambition is not onely to be Empress, but Authoress of a whole World; and that the Worlds I have made, both the Blazing- and the other Philosophical World, mentioned in the first part of this Description, are framed and composed of the most pure, that is, the Rational parts of Matter, which are the parts of my Mind…And in the formation of those Worlds, I take more delight and glory, then ever Alexander or Cesar did in conquering this terrestrial world.


Sowernam, Ester: Esther Hath Hang’d Haman, 1617. One of several responses to Joseph Swetnam’s misogynistic pamphlet “The Arraignment of Lewd, Idle, Froward, and Unconstant Women”, this text methodically points out holes in Swetnam’s logic and refutes his points in like manner.

He runneth on, and saith, They were made of a Rib, and that their froward and crooked nature doth declare, for a Rib is a crooked thing, &c. Woman was made of a crooked rib, so she is crooked of conditions. Joseph Swetnam was made as from Adam of clay and dust, so he is of a durty and muddy disposition.


Barbauld, Anna Laetitia (Aikin): Poems, 1773. Poetry about nature, politics and current events, the poet’s friends, and other subjects.

From glittering scenes which strike the dazzled sight
With mimic grandeur and illusive light,
From idle hurry, and tumultous noise,
From hollow friendships, and from sickly joys,
Will Delia, at the muse’s call retire
To the pure pleasures rural scenes inspire?
Will she from crowds and busy cities fly,
Where wreaths of curling smoke involve the sky,
To taste the grateful shade of spreading trees,
And drink the spirit of the mountain breeze?


And from her Sins of Government, Sins of the Nation, 1793:

If an oppressive law, or a destructive war, were of the nature of a volcano or a hurricane, proceeding from causes totally independent of our operations, all we should have to do, would be to bow our heads in silent submission, and to bear their ravages with a manly patience. We do not repent of a dangerous disorder or a sickly constitution, because these are things which do not depend upon our own efforts…But we are called upon to repent of national sins, because we can help them, and because we ought to help them.

There are some, whose nerves, rather than whose principles, cannot bear cruelty — like other nuisances, they would not chuse it in sight, but they can be well content to know it exists, and that they are indebted for it to the increase of their income, and the luxuries of their table.


Davies, Lady Eleanor: The Benediction, 1651. Davies published a number of works in which she interpreted Biblical prophecies in Daniel and Revelation through anagrams, numerology, and other tools to apply to current events. She anagrammed her own maiden name, Eleanor Audelie, as “Reveale O Daniel.” This document asserts God’s blessing on Oliver Cromwell.

By whom Decypher’d that Generals Thundring Donative his the Crown and Bended Bowe (Rev. 6.) That Seal or Box of Nard opened; as much to say, O: Cromwel, Renowned be Victorious so long as Sun Moon continues or livever.

Anagram, Howl Rome: And thus with one voice, come and see, O: C: Conquering and to Conquer went forth.


Take a look at the WWO database while it’s still Women’s History Month!

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of […]MORE

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

While the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in […]MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above. It was fun […]MORE