On Suffering

On Suffering

Posted by: on March 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Service

By guest blogger Claire Kleinshmidt ’17

Riding home from Shaw’s on the RIPTA is usually pretty uneventful. People get on the bus, people get off the bus, and life continues as a series of stops along a never-ending loop. The routine continues as a mechanism for human dispersal, but the ride itself rarely seems to fulfill any purpose.

 Listening to a conversation between the bus driver and an older gentleman the other day proved otherwise. They were discussing the best hospitals, not out of concern for the costs or the training of the doctors, but instead out of worry about how much the patients were treated like family.

 Quietly, the bus driver began telling his life story.

 He was shot once in war and had to have emergency surgery. He was shot again and had another surgery. And when he was better and done fighting, he was diagnosed with stomach cancer. He went through 23 rounds of treatment without any family by his side and recovered fully. He almost teared up when he talked about the nurses and doctors who went out of their way to become his family while he was in the hospital. They gave him a reason to keep getting better and the support to keep fighting, and they taught him what compassion was after years of war and fighting had numbed him to life.

 I think that we are all called to be compassionate caregivers of humanity, especially during Lent. We are called to suffer alongside Christ just as those doctors suffered alongside this man. We are called to show each other light in a world of hurt and darkness. We are called to put ourselves and our wants aside and to put on Christ. We are called to see this world not as an end, but as a beginning. We are called to take up our crosses and grow closer to Christ in suffering, for true sacrifice on this Earth opens up the doors to the love and joy that is the Resurrection.  

By guest blogger Claire Kleinshmidt ’17 Riding home from Shaw’s on the RIPTA is usually pretty uneventful. People get on the bus, people get off the bus, and life continues as a series of stops along a never-ending loop. The routine continues as a mechanism for human dispersal, but the ride itself rarely seems to […]MORE