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Campus Ministry

Take 5 – March 22nd

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|#take5

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Rome

Trip to the Basilica of St. Dominic in Bologna

Posted by: on November 14, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

This month’s PC-in-Rome blog will have a very special guest editor!

Shortly before I arrived in Rome, I received an email from a former student and current PC-alumnus, Justin Gough. I had come to know Justin over the course of a few of my philosophy courses at PC, and remember how he distinguished himself with his characteristically reflective responses. Justin wrote to me this time not as a student, but as a colleague who is completing his studies at the Pontifical North American College here in Rome. As part of his duties, Justin serves on a team that helps the Apostolic mission of both the PNAC and PC, serving as an ambassador for our students by guiding their individual spiritual journeys as they study abroad in Rome. He and his colleagues at the PNAC have done our students invaluable service over the past weeks, from organizing volunteer activities like distributing sandwiches to the needy around St. Peter’s square, to weekly Bible study, to hosting an ‘American hamburger night’ for students wanting a taste of home. But so far the most special experience, to my mind, was our recent trip to the city of Bologna for the purpose of venerating the holy remains of the founder of the Order of Preachers, Saint Dominic.

**** I’ll let Justin tell the story in his own words from here on out! ****

In 2015, I graduated from Providence College with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and completed the priestly formation program at the Seminary of Our Lady of Providence as a seminarian for the Archdiocese of Baltimore. At that time, Archbishop William Lori assigned me to complete my formation in Rome at the Pontifical North American College and to study sacred theology at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas “Angelicum”. I am happy to serve the seminary community as one of the house organists, and I enjoy the opportunities to play the instruments in some of Rome’s most significant churches. It is likewise a pleasure to minister to the study abroad students of Providence College as one of the seminarian chaplains. If it be God’s will, I hope to be ordained a deacon in May 2019 and a priest in June 2020.

On 1 November 2017, the students of the Pontifical North American College who serve as chaplains to the Providence College Rome program organized and accompanied some of our abroad Friars to the city of Bologna, in northern Italy. Bologna is home to the worlds’ oldest university in continuous operation and, more importantly for our purposes, to the mortal remains of St. Dominic. Thus, we marked the Solemnity of All Saints (Tutti i Santi––a national holiday in Italy) appropriately with a proper pilgrimage to venerate the tomb of the saintly founder of the Order of Preachers. To Dominic’s heritage, we are indebted; and to his intercession before Almighty God, we continue to rely.

The Pontifical North American College has served as the United States’ seminary in Rome since 1859. There, men from across the country, as well as some from Canada and Australia, are formed to be priests after the heart of Jesus Christ, with the added benefit of firsthand experiences of the universality of the Church and the ministry of the successor of St. Peter, the Pope.

As part of our formation, we seminarians are entrusted with various apostolic assignments across the city, and four––two deacons and two third year seminarians––are assigned this year to minister to the students of Providence College as their chaplains abroad. We also function as chaplains to their classmates at the CEA Rome Center. On a weekly basis, we are happy to offer the students Bible studies to strengthen their faith, as well as various social events to foster friendships and build up Christian fraternity. Above all formal events, the seminarians are pleased to be available to the students in whatever way we can be to their aid, to make their time here in Rome enjoyable and fruitful.

In Bologna, our pilgrimage began with a visit to a few of the city’s most notable churches, known especially for their architectural and artistic innovations. The Cathedral of St. Peter features a painted side-chapel that gives the illusion of being a three-dimensional marble baroque altar and a stunning terracotta sculpture of the “Lament over the Dead Christ,” which emphasizes the wailing agony of Mary and the disciples after the crucifixion.

Time in the marvelous Basilica of San Petronio rounded out our morning. By volume, it is the tenth-largest church in the world and, during the Renaissance, there were plans to expand the church to be larger than St. Peter’s in Rome––plans only to be halted by the Bishop of Rome himself. Today, the Chapel of the Magi, which depicts, among other things, Dante’s envisioning of heaven and hell, remains a ‘must-see’!

As no pilgrimage in Italy is complete without a due sampling of the regions’ culinary delights, our lunch in the city center afforded us the chance to taste some of the many wonderful flavors of Bologna, specifically a proper ‘pasta al ragù alla Bolognese’ and a veal cutlet ‘alla Bologense’!

We followed lunch with a steep climb up the great Asinelli tower––nearly 500 stairs!–to a beautiful vista of the sprawling city below.

Back on the ground, we walked through the painted halls of the University of Bologna, in the footsteps of some of its most notable alumni and faculty: St. Thomas Becket, Dante, Copernicus, Michelangelo, St. Charles Borromeo, and many others.

In the evening, we held Mass at the tomb of St. Dominic at the Basilica of San Domenico, a Mass offered particularly for Providence College and its Friars.

The sarcophagus that holds St. Dominic’s remains is itself brilliant and worthy of great study. Around the backside of the altar, his skull is visible behind glass in a reliquary. As one who dedicated his life to the preaching of the Truth and entrusted his Order to the very same, there is perhaps no part of Dominic’s mortal remains more moving to come in contact with than this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Following a quick pizza dinner, we made the journey back to Rome on a late train.

And so ended an All Saints’ Day pilgrimage surely to be remembered!

This month’s PC-in-Rome blog will have a very special guest editor! Shortly before I arrived in Rome, I received an email from a former student and current PC-alumnus, Justin Gough. I had come to know Justin over the course of a few of my philosophy courses at PC, and remember how he distinguished himself with […]MORE

PC Smarty Pants

Spring Break is Over

Posted by: on April 12, 2017   |Comments (0)|Staff

GUEST BLOGGER: MANUELA BARCELOS
Manuela is the ESL/Academic Skills Specialist in the OAS.  When she is not working, she enjoys spending time with family, leisurely dinners with friends, and keeping up with all the NBC Chicago episodes.

You looked forward to the much-awaited week of spring break. The anticipation mounted as the days drew nearer and then…it was over before you could say “tequila!” Now, the transition to the routine you eagerly left behind before break seems like a form of human torture.  How do you get back on that proverbial hamster wheel?

REFLECT:  Take the time to realize that spring break was just what the doctor ordered. You may be coming off of spring break feeling like you should’ve accomplished some school work or that you slept more than you should have. Lose the guilt. You needed the time to recoup and if you slept more than usual, that was your body telling you that it was time to recharge. Be grateful for the R&R you got over break. Don’t get caught up in useless regrets over not having gotten any work done. That time is gone and you can’t get it back. It’s more fruitful to think about how to get on track again.

TAKE BABY STEPS:   You may not feel immediately motivated to hit the books, so take small steps toward getting in gear. You can start by unpacking. Leaving your unpacked bags lying around will only remind you of your long lost spring break. Get some laundry done. Put all your toiletries away, etc. Maybe even run an errand or two.

PLAN AHEAD:  As you think about what lies ahead for the remainder of the semester, it all seems like work work work work work!  Before the nostalgia of your spring break creeps in, get out your calendar. Plan for the week ahead. Make some room in your calendar for small rewards to look forward to soon. For example, pencil in some study breaks throughout the week in which you can indulge in some of Ray’s delights like FroYo, chicken nugget day, or make your own s’mores. Once you get through your first week back, plan an outing on the weekend with friends – maybe a trip to the movies or your favorite burger spot. These may pale in comparison to the week you just had in Cancun or vegging back home, but they will get you through until your next break.

Speaking of your next break…while you are updating your calendar, plug in your 5-day Easter Recess. And when that’s over there are only 26 days left before the official end of the semester. But who’s counting, right?

 

Adapted from:  Jimenez, R. (2015, March 17). Post spring break: getting back into the groove. KTB.

Retrieved from http://killingthebreeze.com/post-spring-break-getting-back-groove/

GUEST BLOGGER: MANUELA BARCELOS Manuela is the ESL/Academic Skills Specialist in the OAS.  When she is not working, she enjoys spending time with family, leisurely dinners with friends, and keeping up with all the NBC Chicago episodes. You looked forward to the much-awaited week of spring break. The anticipation mounted as the days drew nearer […]MORE

Student Research

Summer in the chemistry lab: A satisfying science experience

Posted by: on August 15, 2017   |Comment (1)|Student Engagement

It’s been a week since I finished summer research and life is different. It feels weird not being in the lab every day. I miss all the fun moments I had in the lab with the research team. I miss listening to hip-hop and R&B while working up a reaction. I miss getting lunch with my lab mates almost every day. Bianca, Matt, Gersham, Kyle, Yazan & I became so close that we all developed a special bond. We became so comfortable with each other that we would talk about anything. I would look forward to our lunch dates every day. We went to a lot of great restaurants Providence has to offer like The Abbey, Anthony’s, and many others on Thayer St., like East Side Pockets.

In the last few weeks of research, our biggest adventure was the 10th Annual Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Conference at the University of Rhode Island. The SURF program funds most of the research conducted over the summer throughout Rhode Island. In turn, researchers funded by SURF attend the conference and present their work. Our group presented our work by assembling a poster containing all the projects we worked on this summer. The conference was great because the team and I got to present all our hard work and got to see many other chemists, biologists, and biochemists. We were also hands-down the best dressed group at the conference! See the picture for yourself. We kept on receiving compliments from multiple people on how well dressed we were. It was nice to get dressed up and not wear sweatpants all day for once.

I am close to finishing my project which is a-carboline synthesis. I completed the final step of my project the day before the conference, and I produced high yields! Although summer research is over, that doesn’t mean my research is over. I plan on continuing my research in the fall. I’m looking forward to completing my project and all the chemistry that awaits me in the year to come!  I’d like to thank Dr. Mulcahy and the Providence College Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry for granting me the opportunity do research this summer. I have learned a lot, and I can’t wait to continue learning in the upcoming semester. I’d also like thank all of you for reading my blog and keeping up with all the exciting events that happened this summer.

Vincent Ndahayo

It’s been a week since I finished summer research and life is different. It feels weird not being in the lab every day. I miss all the fun moments I had in the lab with the research team. I miss listening to hip-hop and R&B while working up a reaction. I miss getting lunch with my lab mates almost every […]MORE

Digital Publishing

Prince and Copyright

Posted by: on June 29, 2017   |Comments (0)|Copyright and Fair Use

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news since his untimely passing and two stories of note have emerged in recent months.

The first centers around a fair use debate, similar in nature to a case covered in a previous post about Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a photo as inspiration: The estate of Andy Warhol has filed suit against New York City photographer Lynn Goldsmith as a preemptive strike to protect Warhol’s legacy. According to the NY Daily News, Goldsmith had been expected to file a copyright infringement lawsuit against the estate. Goldsmith alleges that Warhol used a photo she took of Prince in 1981 as inspiration for his Prince Series (created in 1984) without asking permission or crediting her.

The estate argues that Warhol’s appropriation of the photo was transformative enough to be considered new work (therefore, meeting the terms of fair use under U.S. copyright law) and allege Goldsmith’s objective is extortion. Estate lawyer Luke Nikas stated in court documents that, “Although Warhol often used photographs taken by others as inspiration for his portraits, Warhol’s works were entirely new creations. As would be plain to any reasonable observer, each portrait in Warhol’s Prince Series fundamentally transformed the visual aesthetic and meaning of the Prince Publicity Photograph.” When asked why she did not pursue legal measures at any point over the past 30 years, Goldsmith said that she was only made aware of the pieces in 2016, when Condé Nast published a special issue called The Genius of Prince. The estate counters that she knew of the pieces as far back as 1984, when she granted permission to Vanity Fair to publish one of them.

Prince’s image isn’t the only thing sparking debate – his catalog of work is, as well. While his Warner Bros. music catalog was released earlier this year to digital streaming platforms, his videography remains largely inaccessible to the public due to copyright disputes. Will his full videography eventually be made available? And further, will the public ever gain access to the material in his Paisley Park estate’s storied vault? It’s been speculated that nearly all contents of the vault lack thorough rights contracts.

Prince’s estate has been in flux for some time, as it’s battled to resolve contractual disputes over copyright issues with Warner and Universal. Since his passing in April 2016, various issues involving copyright have arisen. The public’s collective hope is for speedy resolution to copyright matters so all may freely access his work. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Copyright disputes over Prince’s material and image have been making news since his untimely passing and two stories of note have emerged in recent months. The first centers around a fair use debate, similar in nature to a case covered in a previous post about Shepard Fairey’s Obama HOPE poster and his use of a […]MORE

Elementary Special Education Abroad

Caitlin in Florence

Posted by: on December 9, 2016   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Caitlin Whitaker

ESE Study Abroad Blog

Week of December 4

 

I can’t believe we are in the single digit countdown to coming home! This has been such an incredible experience it’s hard to believe that we have less than 10 days left. One of the best parts of this experiences has been practicum. Teaching in an italian classroom has been incredible and nothing like what I expected. For starters, I NEVER expected to teach with my hands this much!! And I never expected to teach in a room with no technology. 2 chalboards. That was all I had.  

I don’t know what I was expecting going into this experience. It never really hit me until I got into the classroom that I was teaching English to Italian students. When I walked into the room for the first day the students were so excited and all yelled “good morning” at me. That is why it did not hit me until after I sat down to observe and they all started yelling in Italian. I was attempting to make out the few Italian words I knew, like how to say pizza, pasta and thank you….but none of the students were using those. It was very overwhelming…but I was also excited.

My favorite lesson of this semester was by far the last lesson I taught, my Christmas lesson. Anyone who knows me knows how much I love Christmas, so it is obvious that this is by far my favorite subject to teach. Throughout the semester I always made it a point to integrate US cultures and traditions into my lessons whenever possible. I liked to show the students how things are different at home and give them as accurate of a picture of America as possible. When I taught the Christmas lesson we compared Christmas in Italy to Christmas in America and found many similarities and a few differences. For example, in Italy there are no stockings hung by the fireplace. When I was explaining it to the students they thought it was the coolest thing ever but did not understand how Santa could fit anything in a pair of tights!! During the lesson the students were decorating paper ornaments and hanging them up on the paper tree I placed at the front of the room. It was an indescribable feeling to be looking around the room at my little Italian 6th graders as they colored ornaments, writing English phrases on them and randomly bursting into song, with those songs being various American Christmas Carols. I saw the students writing things on their ornaments that I taught them weeks ago. It was such an incredible feeling to see that the students were actually learning and understanding what I was teaching them.

So now as practicum has come to a close, all the weekend trips have ended, and we are in the final single digit countdown, I am realizing more and more how grateful I am for this experience. It has changed me in ways I cannot describe, but I am so thankful for. Florence is a beautiful place to be able to call home for 4 months, but I think I am ready to be back in Friartown!!

 

Caitlin Whitaker ESE Study Abroad Blog Week of December 4   I can’t believe we are in the single digit countdown to coming home! This has been such an incredible experience it’s hard to believe that we have less than 10 days left. One of the best parts of this experiences has been practicum. Teaching […]MORE

Phil Buzz

Who WAS Saint Martin?

Posted by: on January 27, 2016   |Comments (3)|Philbuzz

Almost eight hundred years ago, in December of 1216, the birth of a new religious order also took place. Father Dominic de Guzman, a Spanish priest, petitioned Pope Honorius II successfully for a new religious order, which would come to be called the Order of Preachers. To celebrate this anniversary and Black History Month, there is an exhibit in the library honoring a black Peruvian Dominican who became a saint: Saint Martin de Porres. Who was Saint Martin?

stm1

Martin de Porres Velázquez, O.P. (December 9, 1579 – November 3, 1639), was a lay brother of the Dominican Order who was beatified in 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI and canonized in 1962 by Pope John XXIII. He is the patron saint of mixed-race people, barbers, innkeepers, public health workers, and all those seeking racial harmony.

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Born in the city of Lima, he was the illegitimate son of a Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Porres, and Ana Velázquez, a freed slave from Panama. He had a sister named Juana, born two years later in 1581 and after the birth of his sister, the father abandoned the family. Ana Velázquez supported her children by taking in laundry. He grew up in poverty and, when his mother could not support him, Martin was confided to a primary school for two years, and then placed with a barber/surgeon to learn the medical arts. He spent hours of the night in prayer, a practice which increased as he grew older.

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By law in Peru, descendants of Africans and Indians were barred from becoming full members of religious orders. The only route open to Martin was to ask the Dominicans of Holy Rosary Priory in Lima to accept him as a “donado”, a volunteer who performed menial tasks in the monastery in return for the privilege of wearing the habit and living with the religious community. At the age of 15 he asked for admission to the Dominican Convent of the Rosary in Lima and was received first as a servant boy, and as his duties grew he was promoted to almoner.

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Martin continued to practice his old trades of barbering and healing and was said to have performed many miraculous cures. He also took on kitchen work, laundry, and cleaning. After eight years at Holy Rosary, the prior Juan de Lorenzana, decided to turn a blind eye to the law and permit Martin to take his vows as a member of the Third Order of Saint Dominic. Holy Rosary was home to 300 men, not all of whom were as open-minded as De Lorenzana; one of the novices called Martin a “mulatto dog,” while one of the priests mocked him for being illegitimate and descended from slaves. He never became a priest. It is said that when his convent was in debt, he implored them: “I am only a poor mulatto, sell me.”

San_Martin_de_Porres_huaycan

When Martin was 34, after he had been given the religious habit of a lay brother, he was assigned to the infirmary, where he was placed in charge and would remain in service until his death at the age of 59. He was known for his care of the sick. His superiors saw in him the virtues necessary to exercise unfailing patience in this difficult role. It was not long before miracles were attributed to him. Martin also cared for the sick outside his convent, often bringing them healing with only a simple glass of water. He ministered without distinction to Spanish nobles and to slaves recently brought from Africa.

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Martin did not eat meat. He begged for alms to procure necessities the convent could not provide.  In normal times, Martin succeeded with his alms to feed 160 poor persons every day, and distributed a remarkable sum of money every week to the indigent. Side by side with his daily work in the kitchen, laundry and infirmary, Martin’s life is said to have reflected extraordinary gifts: ecstasies that lifted him into the air, light filling the room where he prayed, bilocation, miraculous knowledge, instantaneous cures and a remarkable rapport with animals.  He founded a residence for orphans and abandoned children in the city of Lima.

statue

Martin de Porres is often depicted as a young mulatto friar wearing the old habit of the Dominican lay brother, a black scapular and capuce, along with a broom, since he considered all work to be sacred no matter how menial. He is sometimes shown with a dog, a cat and a mouse eating in peace from the same dish. The statue of him in front of Martin Hall was sculpted by a Dominican Friar, Father Thomas McGlynn, who taught briefly at Providence College.

Almost eight hundred years ago, in December of 1216, the birth of a new religious order also took place. Father Dominic de Guzman, a Spanish priest, petitioned Pope Honorius II successfully for a new religious order, which would come to be called the Order of Preachers. To celebrate this anniversary and Black History Month, there […]MORE

Dining at PC

The Science of Chicken

Posted by: on November 17, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

We have recently been asked about the color of cooked chicken on the grill, and why it sometimes might appear pink. We can assure you, it is not because the chicken is undercooked! Food safety is our highest priority, and there are systems in place to assure both quality and safety of the food we serve everywhere on campus. The goal of this blog post is to answer the specific question regarding how the chicken breast in Raymond Dining Hall is cooked.

The color of cooked poultry can vary greatly based on a number of factors. Everything from white, to tan, to pink, are safe to eat under the stipulation that the appropriate temperature, 165°F, has been reached. Here is some information about what influences the end color of a safely cooked piece of poultry…

In young birds, oven gases readily permeate the skin creating a chemical reaction involving hemoglobin while cooking, therefore altering the final color. Older birds have a thicker layer of fat in between the skin and the meat making it less likely to develop a pink color. Naturally occurring (emphasis on naturally!) nitrates and nitrites in feed and water can also determine the color of the meat both before and after cooking, as can a marinade that includes a nitrite or nitrate-rich ingredient. While it is not necessarily possible to identify one single reason why any piece of poultry might appear to have a pink color, we can certainly hypothesize. For example, garlic in a marinade may play a role as it finds itself on the low-end of the medium category for nitrate content of common vegetables. However, with all things science, it is not a hard and fast rule that garlic will have enough nitrates on its own to change the color of poultry 100% of the time. The range is vast, as no two cloves of garlic are the same, just as no two pieces of chicken breast will be exactly the same. See where I am going with this?

You could have a very young piece of chicken breast, and a clove of garlic with a nitrate content at the high end of its determined range, making for a pink colored piece of cooked chicken. Or, the complete opposite – older chicken, low nitrate content in the garlic, and a white piece of cooked chicken.

In Raymond, we marinate the chicken on the grill with oil, salt, pepper, and garlic. It is then cooked in the oven and finished on the grill. The temperature is checked for every single batch we cook to ensure food safety, no exceptions. If you ever have a concern regarding food safety on campus, we are here to help! All dining managers and supervisors are ServSafe certified, the national standard for food safety management certification, and can address your questions. You can also send us an email at pcdining@providence.edu.

 

Sarah Ereio, RD, LDN
Registered Dietitian | Providence College Dining Services
401.865.2663

We have recently been asked about the color of cooked chicken on the grill, and why it sometimes might appear pink. We can assure you, it is not because the chicken is undercooked! Food safety is our highest priority, and there are systems in place to assure both quality and safety of the food we […]MORE

Parents

It Will All Work Out

Posted by: on November 27, 2017   |Comments (0)|Students

I always feel that the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas are some of the busiest times for me. Maybe, many of you can relate to that, as well. I have projects to finish, papers to correct, and, of course, lots to do to get ready for the holidays. It is times like this that I especially appreciate having a friend or family member to help me to put things in perspective – and remind me that it will all work out.

Now that your sons and daughters are back from Thanksgiving break, they are probably finding themselves feeling a bit overwhelmed with all they need to do before heading home for winter break. Time is running out on the fall semester and students are racing to meet deadlines to complete papers, projects, and other class assignments. Parents you can be a real source of support to your sons and daughters at this especially stressful time — and remind them that it will all work out.

Here are a few helpful strategies you might want to consider as your student gets ready for finals:

  • This is an especially important time to encourage use of support services. The Personal Counseling Center and the Office of Academic Services are two resources that can help students feel less overwhelmed and more academically prepared to deal with end-of-semester responsibilities.
  • Help them to reflect on how they coped with stress in the past. What worked for them? Remind them of some of the positive choices they have made to get them through challenging times.
  • Be mindful that right now students may neglect some of their own physical/emotional needs. Staying up late, pulling “all nighters,” consuming large amounts of caffeine, and eating on the run, can contribute to students becoming physically ill at a time when they need to be healthy and in control. Encourage a visit to the Student Health Center at the first sign of trouble.
  • Time management skills are put to the test right now. For a student who is on real “overload,” just helping him/her to break down larger tasks into smaller ones or strategizing a plan of action can make a real difference as the semester comes to a close.

Finally parents, as you well know, this is a great time to send your student a care package. Of course, goodies and snacks are always appreciated. One mom told me that at this especially stressful time she always puts little notes of encouragement in every package she sends her daughter. She calls this her own version of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.”

Remember to take good care of yourselves at this busy time.

God Bless.

Jackie

 

I always feel that the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas are some of the busiest times for me. Maybe, many of you can relate to that, as well. I have projects to finish, papers to correct, and, of course, lots to do to get ready for the holidays. It is times like this that I […]MORE

Momentum - Campus Transformation at Providence College

Huxley Avenue Transformation Update

Posted by: on April 19, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized


Check out the new video on Momentum on the Huxley Avenue transformation.

Check out the new video on Momentum on the Huxley Avenue transformation.MORE