Login

Welcome to Providence College Blogs

Women Writers Online: still free for one more week

Posted by: on March 24, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern women’s writing, is still free to access for the rest of the month! WWO’s contents include short and long poetry, plays, novels, essays and religious content, midwifery books, and more. Writers at all levels of fame are represented, from Elizabeth I and Aphra Behn to anonymous and pseudonymous writers. Here are just a few of the texts:


Cavendish, Margaret (Lucas), Duchess of Newcastle: The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing-World, 1667. An early work of sci-fi!

Neither was it a wonder that the men did freeze to death; for they were not onely driven to the very end or point of the Pole of that World, but even to another Pole of another World, which joined close to it…

By this Poetical Description, you may perceive, that my ambition is not onely to be Empress, but Authoress of a whole World; and that the Worlds I have made, both the Blazing- and the other Philosophical World, mentioned in the first part of this Description, are framed and composed of the most pure, that is, the Rational parts of Matter, which are the parts of my Mind…And in the formation of those Worlds, I take more delight and glory, then ever Alexander or Cesar did in conquering this terrestrial world.


Sowernam, Ester: Esther Hath Hang’d Haman, 1617. One of several responses to Joseph Swetnam’s misogynistic pamphlet “The Arraignment of Lewd, Idle, Froward, and Unconstant Women”, this text methodically points out holes in Swetnam’s logic and refutes his points in like manner.

He runneth on, and saith, They were made of a Rib, and that their froward and crooked nature doth declare, for a Rib is a crooked thing, &c. Woman was made of a crooked rib, so she is crooked of conditions. Joseph Swetnam was made as from Adam of clay and dust, so he is of a durty and muddy disposition.


Barbauld, Anna Laetitia (Aikin): Poems, 1773. Poetry about nature, politics and current events, the poet’s friends, and other subjects.

From glittering scenes which strike the dazzled sight
With mimic grandeur and illusive light,
From idle hurry, and tumultous noise,
From hollow friendships, and from sickly joys,
Will Delia, at the muse’s call retire
To the pure pleasures rural scenes inspire?
Will she from crowds and busy cities fly,
Where wreaths of curling smoke involve the sky,
To taste the grateful shade of spreading trees,
And drink the spirit of the mountain breeze?


And from her Sins of Government, Sins of the Nation, 1793:

If an oppressive law, or a destructive war, were of the nature of a volcano or a hurricane, proceeding from causes totally independent of our operations, all we should have to do, would be to bow our heads in silent submission, and to bear their ravages with a manly patience. We do not repent of a dangerous disorder or a sickly constitution, because these are things which do not depend upon our own efforts…But we are called upon to repent of national sins, because we can help them, and because we ought to help them.

There are some, whose nerves, rather than whose principles, cannot bear cruelty — like other nuisances, they would not chuse it in sight, but they can be well content to know it exists, and that they are indebted for it to the increase of their income, and the luxuries of their table.


Davies, Lady Eleanor: The Benediction, 1651. Davies published a number of works in which she interpreted Biblical prophecies in Daniel and Revelation through anagrams, numerology, and other tools to apply to current events. She anagrammed her own maiden name, Eleanor Audelie, as “Reveale O Daniel.” This document asserts God’s blessing on Oliver Cromwell.

By whom Decypher’d that Generals Thundring Donative his the Crown and Bended Bowe (Rev. 6.) That Seal or Box of Nard opened; as much to say, O: Cromwel, Renowned be Victorious so long as Sun Moon continues or livever.

Anagram, Howl Rome: And thus with one voice, come and see, O: C: Conquering and to Conquer went forth.


Take a look at the WWO database while it’s still Women’s History Month!

We’re nearing the tail end of Women’s History Month, and Women Writers Online, a database of transcriptions of early modern... MORE

A Look at the NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition

Posted by: on March 20, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

Kevin Jarrett’s photo Boardwalk Binoculars (cropped). Flickr. CC BY.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education. The Horizon Report > Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report identifies key trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology and provides a discussion of how these areas are likely to impact the core missions of universities and colleges.

This year’s Horizon Report looks specifically at key trends accelerating higher education technology adoption including blended learning design, collaborative learning, growing focus on measuring learning, and advancing cultures of innovation.  The report moves on to examine challenges impeding higher ed technology adoption including improving digital literacy, integrating formal and informal learning, and advancing digital equity.  Finally, a key section of the report includes a technology-planning guide that highlights important developments in technology for higher education.  Report authors identified adaptive learning technologies, mobile learning, the Internet of Things, and next-generation learning management systems as the technologies most likely to impact the higher education landscape in the next two to three years, with artificial intelligence and natural user interfaces farther in the horizon.

Horizon Report ImageWhile the Horizon Report is awaited with interest each year, it is not without critics.  Audrey Watters of Hack Education, for example, argues that the report fails to provide sufficient information about technologies it has identified as important in the past that no longer figure into the analysis.  Watters’ writes, “gone from the horizon, these technologies from last year’s report: learning analytics, augmented reality and VR, makerspaces, affective computing, and robotics. Were they adopted? Were they rejected? The report does little to help us understand this.”  For more see the piece What’s on the Horizon (Still, Again, Always) for Ed-Tech.

View the full 2017 Higher Education Edition here.

Past Horizon Reports on Higher Education are also available: 2016, 2015.

Horizon Reports on the subjects of K-12, Libraries, and Museums are also released annually.  Browse all Horizon Reports here.

Released annually, the Horizon Report aims to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and... MORE

DPS Learns about Drones

Posted by: on March 3, 2017   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones.  Chris brought over the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. Chris has used this and another DJI drone to take some some amazing aerial photos and video footage of campus including the image above.

 

Chris Judge demos the drone controls for DPS team members Stephen, Rebecca, and Elizabeth.

It was fun to see the drone in action and think about drones could be used to enhance academic work done here at PC. We will continue to think about how the library might support further engagement with drones on campus.

Here’s a quick video of the drone flying above the Ruane Center for the Humanities.  Flying a drone on a cold windy day is not for faint of heart!

To learn more about academic applications for drones visit:

Early Days for Drone Use in Higher Education, Educause Review: Author Timothy Chester outlines where he sees drones best fitting into the curriculum around the study of agriculture , human health, emergency response, and art.

JMU Drones Project: Great example of an interdisciplinary research team at James Madison University using drones to tackle problems links.

Safe Use of Drones on Campus: Information on drone safety and legal implications of having drones on campus

 

DPS is grateful to Chris Judge, Providence College’s talented and knowledgeable videographer, for meeting with us to talk about drones. ... MORE

Metropolitan Museum of Art Makes 375,000 Images Open Access

Posted by: on February 23, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Access

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative Commons Zero license. The development comes as part of the Met’s Open Access initiative, in partnership with Wikimedia Commons, and means that users can access photos of a portion of the Met’s inventory for web viewing and for use with no copyright restriction.

Richard Knipel, president of Wikimedia’s NYC chapter, wrote a blog post detailing the museum’s ongoing open access project, and Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the museum, said in a recent statement that, “Increasing access to the Museum’s collection and scholarship serves the interests and needs of our 21st-century audiences by offering new resources for creativity, knowledge, and ideas. We thank Creative Commons, an international leader in open access and copyright, for being a partner in this effort.”

The museum has partnered with Creative Commons, Wikimedia, Artstor, Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Art Resource, and Pinterest to publicize the initiative. The collection can be viewed on the Met’s site here, on Wikimedia, or via Creative Commons. (Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4)

This month, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art made 375,000 public domain images available for free use under a Creative... MORE

A New Look for PC’s Digital Commons

Posted by: on February 17, 2017   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

DC Site RedesignProvidence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a gallery of some of the collections that we are digitizing and journals we are publishing, including the archive of PC’s student newspaper, The Cowl and The Providence College Art Journal, which publishes the Art History and Studio Art senior theses along with original student artworks in a variety of media. Check it out at: http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/.

Providence College’s Digital Commons, an open-access repository of faculty and student scholarship, has been redesigned! The new homepage features a... MORE

The Zeutschel overhead scanner is here!

Posted by: on February 10, 2017   |Comments (0)|Uncategorized

Digital Publishing Services is proud to announce a new addition to the DPS Lab! The Zeutschel OS12002 overhead cradle book scanner. This mighty piece of equipment will allow the DPS Lab to work with a variety of print materials, including delicate/ fragile bound books and documents, to larger books, maps and newspapers.  The overhead scanner houses two highly sensitive and intuitive cameras that scan the documents, one of which is a 3D camera, which through the software PerfectBook, can correct the curvature of a book, document, etc.  This scanner was designed specifically to deal with all of the complicated issues many archivists of print material have had to deal with over the years. Digital Publishing Services is excited have this scanner in our possession so we can move forward with many ambitious projects in the future.

Digital Publishing Services is proud to announce a new addition to the DPS Lab! The Zeutschel OS12002 overhead cradle book... MORE

Rosarium is Live

Posted by: on February 3, 2017   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

Rosarium has been up and running for a few months, but I don’t think it’s been officially announced anywhere, so: Rosarium is live!

The Rosarium Project is an online collection of nonfiction writing about roses compiled and TEI-encoded by Julia R. Tryon, Assistant Professor and Commons Librarian for Research & Education at PC. It is expected to be of use to garden historians, to gardeners who may be interested in learning about older techniques and cultivars, and to scholars of leisure activity and lifestyles.

Currently the collection contains magazine articles dating from 1894 to 1922, with an eventual goal of expanding its chronological scope backwards to the sixteenth century. It is fully searchable. Results are sortable by date, reverse date, journal, title, or author, and can additionally be filtered by rose variety or other subject, by rose color, and by journal type (literary, women’s, arts, gardening, etc.). The user can add records to a bookbag which can then be emailed, generate citations, and learn more about people and terms mentioned in the articles by reading pop-ups which appear when names are clicked.

  • View Rosarium here.
  • More about Rosarium here.

Here are a few screenshots:

Rosarium has been up and running for a few months, but I don’t think it’s been officially announced anywhere, so:... MORE

SPARC’s Director of Open Education Visits PC

Posted by: on January 30, 2017   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and Solving the Textbook Cost Crisis on Monday, January 23rd.  View the slides from the talk here.

Allen described the current state of the textbook market, described how this is hurting students both financially and academically, and outlines some concrete examples of how open textbooks and OER can mitigate the problem.  The talk concluded with some helpful, concrete steps for librarians and faculty interested in setting the default to “open.”  Suggested steps include: when you can share, do share; change the default- consider using OER first for teaching or presentations, and then explore other options; support faculty as they work to adopt, adapt, and create OER; and, make “open” your mission.  Allen’s talk was attended by a mix of librarians, administrator, and faculty.  The event was recorded and a can be viewed here.

In addition to presenting this talk, Allen also attended a meeting of recipients of the OER mini-grants awarded by the Provost’s office.  Faculty grantees come from Education; Chemistry and Biochemistry; Psychology; and Finance.  The library and the Center for Teaching Excellence will work closely with these faculty as they adapt their syllabi to include OER.  More information on the progress of this initiative will be shared as it develops.

Providence College was pleased to host SPARC’s Director of Open Education, Nicole Allen, who gave a talk entitled OER and... MORE

Google’s New PhotoScan App Turns Prints into High-Quality Digital Images

Posted by: on December 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a quick-and-dirty solution that usually sacrifices image quality. The Google Photos team has responded with their new PhotoScan app, which harnesses the ease of using a phone camera, while also cleaning up the quality issue. A simple interface allows you to quickly scan multiple photos, while also guiding you through scanning different parts of each photo to produce a much higher-quality image that reduces glare and shadow. The app also offers automatic rotation, cropping, and color-correction. Naturally, PhotoScan seamlessly integrates with Google Photos, but you can also save your scans to your camera roll or share them in other apps.

Ever digitized an old print photo by taking a picture of it with your phone? In a pinch, it’s a... MORE

Providence College Joins Open Textbook Initiative

Posted by: on November 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Educational Resources

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative is to reduce college costs by saving students $5 million over five years using openly licensed textbooks and open educational resources (OERs).  In addition to PC, current participating institutions include: Rhode Island College, the University of Rhode Island, the Community College of Rhode Island, Brown University, Bryant University, Roger Williams University, and the New England Institute of Technology.

PC textbooks Here at PC work has begun raise awareness of OERs and open textbooks on campus.  Representatives from the Library teamed up with Assistant Professor of Economics, James Campbell, to provide an introduction to open textbooks at the Center for Teaching Excellence on November 1st.  The presentation covered the basics of OER, information on locating open materials, and open licensing with Creative Commons.  Campbell is using an OpenStax textbook to teach several sections of Microeconomics this semester.  His insights on the experience were extremely valuable.  You can view the slides from the talk here.

Through generous support from the Provost’s Office the Center for Teaching Excellence and the Library are collaborating to administer a series of small mini-grants to support course design and revision projects that prioritize open educational resources (OERs).  Awardees will be selected this month.  Over the spring semester mini-grant recipients will work closely with the Library to incorporate open content into their syllabi for adoption in Fall 2017.

A Steering Committee made up of library representatives from participating institutions will be responsible for implementation of RI Open Textbook Initiative.  Members of the Steering Committee will communicate with the Open Textbook Network (URI, RIC, and CCRI are now member organizations), provide training opportunities around OERs for librarians around the state, and develop instruments for documenting and reporting student savings resulting from the initiative.

The Library’s Digital Publishing Services has been engaged with work around OERs for some time.  We are thrilled about these new opportunities to collaborate with PC faculty around OERs.  For further reading on this subject check out some of our previous here, here and here.

Providence College has joined the Rhode Island Statewide Open Textbook Initiative.  Launched in September 2016 the goal of the initiative... MORE