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Vatican Affliate Digitizes 1,600-Year-Old Illuminated Manuscript of the Aeneid

Posted by: on July 25, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the Vergilius Vaticanus, one of the world’s oldest illuminated versions of Virgil’s Aeneid.  Vergilius Vaticanus has recently been digitized by Digita Vaticana, a nonprofit organization affiliated with the Vatican Library converting the library’s manuscripts into digital format.

DVL

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Library holds some 80,000 manuscripts and texts. Amongst these texts are surviving fragments of the... MORE

New Open Access Social Sciences Repository

Posted by: on July 17, 2016   |Comments (0)|Scholarly Communication

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science to create an open access digital repository for social science research. This repository will include pre-print copies of recent research articles which can be read without having to register as a user of the site and will be findable in Google Scholar. Researchers will be able to upload their works for free and choose the Creative Commons license that best fits their needs.

Katherine Newman, Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said of the project, “SocArXiv is an exciting opportunity to democratize access to the best of social science research. This resource will make it possible for students, faculty, researchers, policy makers, and the public at large to benefit from the wealth of information, analysis, debate and generative ideas for which the social sciences are so well known. This will assist the nation’s academics in making clear to the public why their work matters beyond the ivy walls.”

SocArxiv

For more information, check out the SocOpen blog and the OSF Preprints website.

 

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] SocArXiv announced this week that they will be working with Center for Open Science... MORE

Theology Collections Portal

Posted by: on July 14, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

Posey_Image2If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology books.  The kiosk presents the Theology Collections Portal, a tool designed to connect users browsing the theology collection with the library’s extensive electronic resources in theology.  Using the touch interface, users can interact with the kiosk according to their research goals.  Options include:

  • Find Scholarly Sources for a Paper (articles, ebooks, specific journal titles)
  • Explore Theology Topics (major religions, Thomas Aquinas, Catholicism and Catholic social thought)
  • Find Bibles and Biblical Commentary
  • Get Research Help
  • Provide Feedback

Kiosk content is presented via a content management system (CMS) called Scalar.  Scalar provides a platform for the creation of rich, digital publications that integrate text and media using a variety of flexible templates.  A signature design element in Scalar is the ability to create multiple narrative paths through a work.  This path functionality made Scalar an ideal CMS for the creation of the theology kiosk content.  Additionally, Scalar presents built-in visualization tools, which allow creators to explore and adjust the relationships between content in different ways.   Scalar is supported by the Alliance for Networked Visual Culture.

You are welcome to explore the Theology Collections Portal online as well as at the iPad kiosk in the library.  Please do contact us with questions or suggestions-  our primary goal is to make the kiosk as helpful as possible for our researchers and your feedback is greatly valued!

 

If you visit the second floor of the Phillips Memorial Library you’ll see an iPad kiosk across from the theology... MORE

Report Finds 65% of Digital Media Consumed via Mobile

Posted by: on June 30, 2016   |Comments (0)|Spotlights

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According to a review of the report by Wireless Week, total usage of digital media has tripled since 2010 and is up more than 30% since 2013, with smartphones accounting for more than 90% of the increase.

When smartphone and tablet usage are combined, time spent mobile-viewing climbs to 65%, up 12 points since 2013. In contrast, browsing via desktop has decreased, dropping from 47% in 2013 to 35% in 2015. Millennials ages 18-34 have the highest volume of mobile usage, with 97% stating they use mobile platforms to access digital content; 20% report as mobile-only users, while 3% report as desktop-only. Millennials say that 20% of their time is spent on social networks, 61% of which is done via smartphone apps.

As mobile usage has increased, so have screen sizes: Since September 2014, devices with 4.5-inch screens (or larger) have seen the greatest increase in usage, while tablets and smartphones with screens smaller than 4.5″ have plateaued and decreased. To learn more and access the report, click here. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

A report from comScore reveals that 65% of digital media in the U.S. is now consumed via mobile devices. According... MORE

“Hamilton” and Digital Humanities

Posted by: on June 24, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

The musical Hamilton, winner of a slew of awards including (most recently) 11 Tonys, has gained notice as a vehicle for educating children and teens about the early history of the United States. Public interest in the Founding Fathers’ lives and views is high — at the moment, Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography of Alexander Hamilton is at the top of the NYT’s paperback nonfiction bestseller list, where it has resided for 35 weeks, and also appears on the e-book nonfiction bestseller list, while Nathaniel Philbrick’s new book on George Washington has a place on the hardcover list. Some die-hard musical fans have moved beyond the Chernow biography into primary sources like Aaron Burr’s journals and John Laurens’s letters.

It’s not only the musical’s content that’s gained a spot in the public eye, though — its critical acclaim and widespread popularity have meant that DH-esque projects relating to its lyrics have attracted mainstream attention of a kind that similar projects on other subjects rarely get. Raplyzer, Eric Malmi’s 2015 program analyzing assonance and other rhymes in rap lyrics, was covered in a handful of sources as a light “computers, whatever will they do next” story — the non-specialist sources largely focused on the aspect of the project where the computer generated raps of its own, rather than on its analysis. (It goes without saying that rhyme analysis tools developed by literature scholars for poetry, like this one by Elise Thorsen and David J. Birnbaum, don’t even get that media attention.) Meanwhile, in 2016, Hamilton’s reputation led the Wall Street Journal itself to develop an algorithm similar to Malmi’s to use on the show’s lyrics; due to the show’s broad appeal, this was widely shared online.

Although the website Genius, a database of rap lyrics and other content with crowdsourced annotations, had been widely covered before its association with Hamilton, observers took particular note of the speed and thoroughness with which the site’s users marked up the show’s libretto. Genius’s strength, as it related to Hamilton specifically, lay in the breadth of knowledge of its crowdsourcing crowd: hip-hop aficionados picked up the references to Grandmaster Flash, Notorious B.I.G. and Jay-Z, fans coming from a musical theatre background noticed the shout-outs to South Pacific and The Last Five Years, and history buffs provided more context for details that are elided or come up only in passing, like the Battle of Fort Necessity, the Whiskey Rebellion, Hercules Mulligan’s slave Cato, or New York’s prominence in the 1770s. These annotations help a reader understand the musical both as a 21st-century document and as a narrative of the 18th-19th century.

Crowdsourced digital humanities projects frequently deal with much larger corpora than this, which need to be put into indexable form before they can be used by researchers. Such projects are therefore less subjective and less demanding of subject area knowledge. A selection of crowdsourced DH projects:

Hamilton fans who would like to read the title character’s writings can find them at Founders Online. A few that may be of interest:

  • “The Farmer Refuted”, actually far more eloquently insulting than its paraphrase in the musical
  • First preserved letter from Hamilton to Eliza Schuyler, his future wife, apologizing for having offered to drive her and a friend to a party before remembering that he was not a good enough driver to do so
  • Draft of an Opinion on the Constitutionality of an Act to Establish a Bank, one of Hamilton’s most noted political successes. This draft, with cross-outs and additions, is an interesting look at Hamilton’s thought process!
  • Letters between Hamilton and Aaron Burr (1, 2, 3, 4) leading up to their duel, signed — indeed — “I have the honor to be your obedient servant, A. Hamilton/A. Burr”
  • And many more!

The musical Hamilton, winner of a slew of awards including (most recently) 11 Tonys, has gained notice as a vehicle... MORE

Hypothes.is

Posted by: on June 16, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac]

Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online tool that allows you to annotate online texts. The goal is to create “free, open, non-profit, neutral” (Hypothes.is, About us, 2016) tools to support the Annotator project, which is working to make the web and online resources easy for everyone to annotate. Annotations can be used to leave comments on specific lines of text (rather than in a comments section), provide citations, view what other researchers have commented, or take notes for personal use.

Hypothes.is is available as a bookmarklet, a Google Chrome extension, and as an addition to a website. For more information or to get started annotating, visit the Hypothes.is website.

Hypothes.is_logo

[Invited guest post by Rebecca Pac] Funded by the Knight, Mellon, Shuttleworth, Sloan and Helmsley Foundations, Hypothes.is is an online... MORE

1,300-Year-Old Writings Inside Later Bookbindings

Posted by: on June 10, 2016   |Comments (0)|Facilities and Tools

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for centuries. Bindings made between the 15th and 18th centuries often (it is estimated 1 out of 5) contain hidden manuscript fragments that can be from much older texts. It was commons practice for bookbinders of the time to cut up and recycle handwritten books from the middle ages following the invention of printing. Thanks to macro x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (MA-XRF), it has become possible to read these older texts used to create 15th through 18th century manuscripts without removing the bookbindings.

Read the full post “X-rays reveal 1,300-year-old writings inside later bookbindings” by Dalya Alberge at The Guardian, US Edition.

bookbinding-16th

New technology has made it possible to read recycled fragments of Medieval manuscripts that have been hidden from view for... MORE

Open Access Science Research in Europe

Posted by: on June 7, 2016   |Comments (0)|Open Access

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island. The Digital Publishing Services and Research & Education Departments at the Phillips Memorial Library are thrilled to have Rebecca interning with us this summer. Rebecca’s professional focus is academic libraries, research and research education, and digital publishing. Rebecca will be providing more posts during her internship, so stay tuned!]

Recently, the Netherlands EU Presidency announced that all publicly-funded scientific research in Europe will be published as open access by 2020. They also released The “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science,” a document which lists the goals, steps, and benefits of open access in the sciences.

Releasing scientific research as open access articles will make new research more relevant and available to researchers, as well as interested citizens. Open science “has the potential to increase the quality and benefits of science by making it faster, more responsive to societal challenges, more inclusive and more accessible to new users” (“The Amsterdam Call for Action” 4, 2016). By making these articles freely available, new research can be read as soon it comes out by anyone who’s interested, rather than requiring access through a university after an embargo period or paid access to a single article. Open access in the sciences will also benefit those outside the science field. The Call for Action notes that by making research available to the public, entrepreneurs can use the findings to come up with new products and services.

A link to the full-text of the “Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science” is provided at European University Association News.

Open Science

[The following invited quest post has been provided by Rebecca Pac. Rebecca is a graduate student in the Graduate School... MORE

Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection

Posted by: on June 2, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Asset Management

Digital Publishing Services recently added the Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection to our dpml.providence.edu site.

Edward P. Doyle, O.P., 1907-1997, was a member of the Providence College faculty from 1941-1954. During a leave of absence for military service Father Doyle served as a World War II U.S. Army Chaplain. As a member of the 104th Infantry Division, Father Doyle was present at the liberation of the concentration camp in Nordhausen, Germany.

The collection includes photographs, text documents, and a single audio file (including a link to the video from that audio file).  The focus of this collection is Father Doyle’s personal photographs from the liberation of the Nordhausen Concentration CampScreen Shot 2016-06-02 at 10.31.08 AM. These images are deeply disturbing, so caution is advised.

Digital Publishing Services recently added the Father Edward Doyle, O.P. Collection to our dpml.providence.edu site. Edward P. Doyle, O.P., 1907-1997, was... MORE

text analysis with Voyant Tools

Posted by: on May 26, 2016   |Comments (0)|Digital Humanities

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis.

Voyant logoVoyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for textual analysis.  Using the tool is easy.  Go to the site and link to or upload your text (the system accepts a wide variety of formats including PDF, XML, TEI, and more).  Once you ingest the text or corpus you are presented with a dashboard of visualizations and tools.  Some of the tools built into Voyant include: Cirrus, a word cloud generator; Summary, a helpful overview of the corpus; Mandala, a visualization that shows the relationship between terms and documents; and many more (explore Voyant’s helpful documentation for the full list of tools).  Another great feature is the ability to generate a URL for the entire corpus dashboard or specific visualizations which can then be linked to or embedded into web-based writing.

Voyant Tools creators Stéfan Sinclar (@sgsinclair) and Geoffrey Rockwell (@GeoffRockwell) have also written a book called Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities (2016, MIT Press).  Rusty on your Greek and wondering what “hermeneutic” means, anyway?  So was I.  Hermeneutic means interpretive or explanatory and comes from the Greek “hermenēus,” interpreter.   The book is accompanied by an extremely rich and helpful web site, Hermeneuti.ca, that uses Voyant to visualize and interpret the book’s content while providing examples of how humanities scholars might integrate textual analysis visualizations into their writing.   One interesting example is found in Now Analyze That! in which speeches on the topic of race by Barack Obama and Jeremiah Wright are analyzed.

Text analysis has been part of the digital humanities toolkit for some time.  Voyant has been in existence since 2013 and several examples of how it has been used in digital pedagogy are available.  These include Brian Croxall’s (@briancroxall) discussion of using Voyant Tools to analyze Hemingway; an explanation of how Voyant Tools was used to analyze a corpus of runaway slave advertisements in the U.S. antebellum south as part of a digital history course at Rice University; and a recent write-up on ProfHacker.

I decided to play with Voyant Tools using the corpus of correspondence presented on our Dorr Letters Project site.  I zipped up all 61 TEI files, uploaded the zip file to Voyant Tools, and got this dashboard:

Voyant Dashboard

How cool!?  There is a lot to unpack in this data but I’ll highlight a couple of the things that most struck me:

  • the most used words in the corpus are: dorr, letter, constitution and state (I didn’t remove the TEI Header, introductory text, or follow-up questions included in our TEI so what shows up in the dashboard is not just representative of the letter content)
  • the second 30 letters in teh collection were written by “Anti-Dorrites.”  isolating that part of the corpus and then comparing it to those letters written by Dorr might be revealing
  • it would be interesting to select only those letters written by Dorr and analyze the frequency of certain terms to see if patterns arise over time in relation to Dorr’s political views (of course, this is a small corpus so broad generalizations are dangerous)

Voyant Tools is simple to use and extremely interesting- give it a try yourself!

tl;dr: Voyant Tools is a free, open, web-based tool for textual analysis. Voyant Tools is an open, web-based tool for... MORE