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Don’t Let the Rain Stop You From Finding Your Future

The Career Expo is finally here. You’ve seen the countdown on Twitter and on our sandwich boards so you know it’s here too. This event is big, it’s actually four fairs in one, because we listened when students said they were too busy to attend multiple career events in September and October. As a result the Career Expo features the Major/Minor Fair, the Internship Showcase, the Graduate School Fair and of course, the Career Fair. The staff in the Center for Career Education has spent months asking employers and graduate schools to sign up, promising them that they will meet the most prepared and impressive students they’ve ever seen. (That would be you.) They’ve asked faculty and students to work at the events that showcase majors and minors at PC and the internships they’ve completed. The staff has worked with vendors on the Expo’s set up in Peterson so that all organizations and representatives will be happy with their table placement because everyone wants a prime spot for optimum student traffic. They’ve solicited sponsors to help pay for the event and convinced students to volunteer to work at the event. They’ve worked with Safety & Security to figure out where 140 additional cars can be parked, which is no easy feat during construction. They’ve done all they can do to ensure a successful event for students to explore majors and minors, internships, graduate schools, and full time jobs. They even convinced recruiters to come to campus a day early to host “Resumania” so students can have their resumes reviewed all day today (9/29) in ’64 Hall. We are so ready for this campus wide event. Not even a little rain will keep our students away! You can feel the energy when you walk into Slavin 108.

Until yesterday. I swear I heard a collective groan reverberate throughout Slavin. That was the moment that the staff learned about the severity of Tropical Storm Joaquin. I can only compare it to the feeling a bride must get when she learns it’s going to rain on her wedding day.  Because while you know you can’t control the weather, deep down you also know it’s going to put a damper (pun intended) on your event. So now we’ve hired shuttles to drive around campus and give students rides to and from the Expo in Peterson.  We hope this will help students stay a bit drier as they make their way to the Expo.

You will have a decision to make tomorrow. Risk the rain and wind, and potentially find your future, or stay in your room, dry and warm, but just as confused and stressed out as you are today about what you’re going to major in, whether or not you want to go to graduate school, where you want to intern, and what you are going to do after graduation.

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” – Wayne Gretzky

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Welcome or Welcome Back!

It’s an exciting time to be back on campus, or to be on campus for the first time. Undoubtedly you will be getting advice from many people in your life about what you should be doing with this time.  I’m going to join the fray and share an article listing 11 things seniors should do to have a job by graduation. It’s great advice, but the title directs this advice to Seniors, which I think is a mistake. This is sage advice for students of all years and all majors. The good news is that if you start doing these things before senior year, you can do them at your own pace instead of trying to squeeze them all into your senior year around everything you’re doing.

And to help you get started, here’s three things I strongly encourage all students to do this September!

1. Activate your eFriars account

2. Follow us on Twitter or Facebook

3. Attend the Career Expo

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If you don’t know where to start, call us at 401-865-1290 and make an appointment with a Career Coach.

Don’t Wait…Slavin 108!

What Can I Do With A Liberal Arts Degree?

If you have even been asked (or asked yourself) “What can you do with a liberal arts degree?” take the time to read this article. It does a wonderful job of opening up the career possibilities that exist for you in today’s world of technology using the numerous skills and qualifications you’ve gained from your Liberal Arts degree!

I encourage all students regardless of their major, to  make an appointment this year with a Career Coach in Slavin 108 by calling 401-865-1290. Make the time to have a conversation about what you’re going to do with your degree. We can help you figure it out, or, if you’ve already figured it out, we can help you get there!

#Don’t Wait!


Are you communicating professionally this summer?

Being able to listen and speak to your supervisors and colleagues is an important part of being successful in your career. It will allow you to meet the expectations of your position, while helping you to build relationships and a professional reputation. Ultimately, having strong communication skills can lead to other opportunities in the future. So regardless of whether you are working as a camp counselor, caddy, office assistant or intern, be sure to communicate professionally.

Catch Up On Your Career Exploration This Summer

One of the most common reasons that students give us for not actively exploring careers is that they don’t have time during the school year. Now that the school year is over, use the upcoming summer months to examine potential careers. In addition to jobs and internships, informational interviewing is an extremely valuable tool to help you learn more about a career field or organization. If you follow the steps below, you’ll be able to conduct one informational interview a month and have three completed by the time you return to PC in the fall.

  1. Create a LinkedIn profile
  2. Use LinkedIn Alumni Pages to find alumni in a desired career field
  3. Connect via LinkedIn and ask to conduct an informational interview
  4. Set time/date for a phone or in-person informational interview (in person is always better!)
  5. Refer to the Networking and Informational Interviews guide in eFriars for help conducting the informational interview
  6. Show up on time, dressed nicely for interview, conduct interview, and thank them for their time
  7. Send follow up thank you note or email

The outcomes of an informational interview include learning about the preparation and education needed for a particular career field, gaining an understanding of the daily work that is done, and making a networking contact in that career field that may be very useful later on. If the interview results in turning a you away from that career path, that is still a very valuable learning experience. Don’t let disappointment overshadow the value in learning that a desired career field isn’t a fit for you after all.

The Center for Career Education is open all summer and students can call and speak to a Career Advisor for help with any of the above by calling 401-865-1290 and setting up a phone or in-person appointment.

Don’t Wait! Don’t let the summer go by without conducting at least one informational interview. You’ll be glad you did!


Don’t Wait! There’s still time to get help!

My niece is a junior at Salve Regina and she recently asked me for some resume advice, so I had her email me her resume so I could take a look.  I’m so glad she did.  She was still using the template she’d used back in high school and it didn’t do her any favors. It didn’t highlight the clinical rotations she’d done as a nursing student, nor the various jobs she’d held during and since high school. Sure it listed them, but it didn’t highlight the skills she’d gained from them. There is a big difference. If she had sent this version out to potential employers, I wonder what kind of response she would have gotten from them, if any. I re-formatted it, edited the statements, asked her questions and sent an improved version back to her, which she is currently working on.


But it made me stop and think.

How many seniors do I have out there in Friartown that are still using resume templates from high school, and like my niece, may not realize these templates aren’t doing them any favors? It pains me to think that they won’t have Jen’s instinct to reach out to someone for help. There’s no shame in not knowing how to do a resume. The shame is not asking for help and sending out a terrible resume that you don’t even know is terrible, and then wondering why you aren’t being considered for jobs. No one is born knowing how to write a great resume. Almost every professional you ask, will tell you they received some type of resume advice they incorporated along the way in order to improve their resume. And while you may not have an Aunt who reviews resumes for a living like Jen does, you do have 8 Career Advisors in Slavin 108 wanting, willing and able to help you. All you need to do is ask.

Come in during daily Quick Question hours with a resume or call 401-865-1290 to make an appointment with a Career Advisor today!

P.S. There is a resume guide in the Resource Library found on the home page of eFriars. And there is still plenty of time to get help before graduation!

Use the Resources Available to Take Control of Your Career Development

griffinGuest Blogger: Griffin Young ’15. Griffin is a senior management major with a minor in Labor-Management Relations. He is also a Career Assistant in the Center for Career Education and Professional Development, Chair of the 2015 Commencement Core, former Coordinator for New Student Orientation and member of the executive board for Special Olympics on campus. He is from Sandwich, MA on Cape Cod and is currently in his job search for an entry level role in the Human Resources Field.




Just before Providence got walloped with all this snow, the Center for Career Education put on three student-alumni Networking Nights in the hubs of Boston, New York, and one right here in Providence. Over 150 alumni participated, and 325 students used their networking skills to build connections with valuable alumni. In January there was an article in The Cowl titled “Expand the Network at Networking Nights: Provide More Connections for English Majors.” The article called attention to the lack of alumni that were in attendance at the Providence event that had careers for Liberal Arts majors. While it is imperative for the student body to let Institutional Advancement, the Center for Career Education and SAA know what it is they are looking for in these networking nights, we also have to recognize that it is ultimately the alumni’s decision to attend these events or not, and it is ultimately the students’ responsibility to take control of our own career development. If we don’t find what we want at one event, we need to seek out other resources and services that will help us. For example, we can use the services that the Career Education Center offers such as quick question hours, individual counseling appointments, the “how to” videos online, and so on. There are probably a lot more resources out there that the school has than you may think.

Networking is a much underutilized, yet extremely powerful tool that students can use at any stage in their college career. Now that the formalized Networking Nights have passed, there is still a plethora of ways that you can continue (or start networking). Here are five ways I’ve built my network, in addition to the networking nights:

  1. LinkedIn

LinkedIn is arguably one of the best tools out there that can help you network your way into a job. The “Find Alumni” function can sort alumni based on geographic region, company, job type, and even their undergraduate major. This list of people can be used for informational interviewing or for potential job shadows. If you are thinking to yourself: “That’s so awkward! Why would I message someone I don’t know about a job that they have?” Take my word for it, it’s not like that at all. As much as you and your friends love PC, chances are that the alum loved PC just as much and most of them love to hear from current PC students. Putting yourself out there and asking the alum for career advice or asking to shadow them to see if you would like their job or not, shows your commitment to taking control of your career. Who knows, it may lead to an internship or a full-time offer down the road!

Because I’ve had an internship in human resources, some of my friends have asked me if recruiters even look at LinkedIn profiles, or if that’s just a myth.” Well, it isn’t a myth. At my internship, the company’s entire recruiting strategy revolved around LinkedIn. Very rarely do they post jobs and have people apply to them online. Having a robust and comprehensive profile on LinkedIn will put you at the top of the list when recruiters are searching for candidates. This past week alone, I have had two different recruiters reach out to me about potential opportunities for full-time positions after graduation. If you need any pointers on using LinkedIn, stop in for Quick Question hours or check out this link on building a LinkedIn profile. If you need a professional picture for your profile, the Spring Career Expo on March 4th from 2-5 in Peterson Center is offering free headshots by a professional photographer to the first 200 students who want one!

  1. Winter Break Shadowing Program

I had the opportunity to shadow two PC alums over this past winter break. This program is a great opportunity that gives you the chance to not only build connections with alumni, but also figure out if the career that you thought you wanted was all you hoped and dreamed for, or on the other side, if it was not what you thought it was going to be. Regardless of the outcome, both results are OK! I have had both results this past break, which has ultimately helped be narrow my job search down to a career path that I now know I want.

  1. Volunteer at PC

Have you ever been asked by your professors to help outside of class with a special project or research? Or asked you to be a part of a panel during an Accepted Students Day? Or maybe even asked to volunteer at an event off-campus? Whatever it may be, always say yes! You may meet someone there that you get talking to that may have a lead for a job or internship. This past weekend I was selected to speak on a panel of seniors for the Career Education Center. At the end, one of the parents came up to me, who coincidentally was an alum, and told me about an opportunity that he had at his company. Had I not been at that panel, I would not have had the chance to be approached. Showing that you want to be as involved as you can and availing yourself to opportunities like these just may lead you to your next job or internship.

  1. Get involved

Every year seniors graduate, right? Right. They are also involved in various clubs and organizations throughout campus, right? Right. Of those seniors, some of them may be in a career field that interests you immediately after they graduate, right? Right. The more you are involved on campus, the more chances that you get to meet people outside your class year and major, with which you might share a similar interest. As a result of my own involvement in various clubs, I have gained connections at different companies, including EMC, Liberty Mutual, and at a large hospital in Boston. The people that I have met in those organizations have given me the opportunity to network and get my foot in the door at each of those companies.

  1. Don’t forget the people you know at home

Over Christmas Break, I was lucky to see most of my extended family for a few days. One of my uncles, who I do not see that often, is a Vice President at a large, multi-national company. He asked me what my plans were after graduation and to forward my resume so he could send it to some people he knew. Although I did not pursue the opportunities that he was able to get me into, it was good for me to remind myself to utilize my family and friends from home as I look for opportunities after graduation.

For those of you who attended the Providence Networking Night, the keynote speaker, Mary Fox ’84, told a story about how she got one of her jobs while hosting a pizza party at her house. One of her son’s friend’s parents started talking to her and it was brought up that she was in transition between jobs. Low and behold, she landed the job. You never know what type of interaction may lead to a job. Whether it be online, by shadowing an alum, volunteering at an event, in a student club, or from a pizza party, be prepared to give your “elevator speech” because who knows, you may be talking to your future employer!

Two Words. Two Syllables. Two Minutes.

Stacey Moulton, Associate Director, Career Education Center at Providence College. Received B.A. in Philosophy & Criminal   Justice from Stonehill College and Masters in Information Age Marketing from Bentley College. Previously worked in Marketing and Securities Lending at State Street Corporation.




T.H.A.N.K  Y.O.U.

Two words. Two Syllables. Two minutes. That is all it takes to thank someone properly. So why do so many people forget to do it? It is easy to remember to thank someone when you receive a tangible gift. However, when someone gives you time, a piece of advice, a professional contact, a verbal thank you simply isn’t enough. It is much more powerful to also send a thank you note. Here’s why.

As you prepare for your future career you want to build your network. To do that, you need to make connections and develop relationships. Speaking with someone, saying thank you, then moving on doesn’t achieve that. Your connection is over. By speaking with someone, then following up with a thank you note (or email) you are showing that you value their time. You are making a positive impression while demonstrating your professionalism. You are “meeting” them a second time and creating an opportunity to build the relationship. The person you met with, may have been thinking about your interests and may now have a suggestion, or possibly a contact to give you, and your note just made it easier (and important) for them to pass this information along to you.

Sending a thank you matters. Take time to master the art of saying thank you.




Tried and True Advice for Career Success

Last week I accompanied 11 PC students to Los Angeles, on our 4th annual PC in Hollywood trip. The program brings students to Hollywood in order to meet with various alumni who are now working in the entertainment industry, and learn how they went from PC student to successful entertainment professional.

The people we met with varied from those just starting out as assistants, to well established agents, producers, writers, and directors. While it was fascinating to meet with each person, and hear how they got to where they are today, it seemed every person had the same secret to their success. And while they were talking about working in Hollywood, their message applies to any student starting out in the professional world.


1. Work hard

2. Go above and beyond

3. Treat people well along the way

4. Network


Work hard: Go in early, stay late, don’t call in sick unless you truly are sick, no matter how trivial a task may seem do it to the best of your ability, do all that is asked of you, take initiative and always follow through.

Go above and beyond:  Give 110% everyday, ask what more can be done when you finish your work, help co-workers with their work when appropriate, be a team player, have a positive attitude.

Treat people well: Be nice to everyone you come in contact with, treat everyone as if they will be future references, don’t burn bridges, be grateful for opportunities, don’t talk about others or cut them down to get ahead.

Network: Use your connections in terms of learning from them, take people to lunch or for coffee to pick their brains, you can learn A LOT from those who are already working in a field you are interested in, think about your personal, school and professional relationships – chances are you already know someone who knows someone you should be connecting with.

The reason these seemingly simple pieces of advice work, is that not everyone will act on them. It isn’t easy to put them into action everyday, but if you do, and do it well, I have no doubt that you will stand out and move up.

Three Resources of the Career Education Center I Wish I Took Advantage Of as an Undergraduate Student

allieGUEST BLOGGER: Allie D’Aprile ’13, Intern, Center for Career Education & Professional Development at Providence College. Allie received her B.A. in Psychology from Providence College and will be completing her M.Ed. from Providence College this May. Additionally, she is a Graduate Assistant in the Office of College Events, and has loved every minute of her time as an undergraduate and graduate student at PC.


As a graduate student and former undergraduate student of PC, one would think that by now I know all of the ins and outs of the College. I can tell you that you can rely on McPhail’s for a really great milkshake, you should avoid Concannon Fitness Center between the hours of 2p.m.-5p.m. if you want to get a treadmill, and that going to a professor’s Office Hours are actually worth it. And now, I can also tell you all about the ins and outs of the Career Education Center!

During my time as an undergraduate, I was by no means a “frequent-flyer” of the Career Education Center. It was not until now, in my 6th year at PC (because of the amazing opportunity I have to work towards completing my internship for my Master’s degree in Counseling in the Career Education Center at PC) that I am able to tell you what a fantastic resource this office truly is! Through this experience and my own, I present to you: Three Resources of the Career Education Center That I Wish I Took Advantage Of as an Undergraduate Student



Though I used this particular resource as an undergraduate, I wish I went back for follow-up appointments regarding my resume. The staff in this office are truly dedicated to helping students develop a strategic and competitive resume that highlights your skills in relation to specific jobs in which you hope to apply.

  • Bring a draft of your resume to your scheduled appointment. I found that going through my resume bullet by bullet with my Career Counselor to be the most beneficial to the development of my final resume.



eFriars in my opinion, is the hub of internship, job and interview searches, postings of Career Workshops, and Events that are hosted by the Career Ed Office!

  • Within the job, internship, & interview tab you can not only look for jobs that have been posted on eFriars, but also jobs on indeed.com, and internships through internships.com.
  • Employers frequently come to campus for info sessions about their companies, and the Career Education Center also hosts educational workshops and career development opportunities. Under the Career Events & Workshops tab students are able to see a listing of these events with time, date and location information.



The Career Education Center offers three main assessments that allow students to take a deeper look into themselves, what strengths they have, and which careers may align with their work interests.

  • MBTI
    • The Myers Briggs Type Indicator is a personality assessment which can help students with career planning at every stage. Knowing one’s personality type is a practical tool for investigating what works for you, then looking for and recognizing work that satisfies your natural preferences.
    • Strengths Quest is an assessment that allows students to gain insights into how to use their talents to achieve academic success, to explore careers, and in leadership development by learning about their top five strengths.
    • Focus combines self-assessment, career and major exploration, decision making and action planning in one comprehensive website. Customized with PC’s majors, students’ assessment results are matched to career options and majors/programs offered at PC. FOCUS guides students through a reliable career and education decision making model to help them select their majors, make informed career decisions and take action.


REMEMBER: Don’t wait, Slavin 108!

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